Rats!


Duane Siegfri
 

We've had the unwelcome visitor as a result of a West Palm Beach Marina.


I'm looking for all points of entry and wondered what others might have done about the exhaust behind the port side Amel logo panel, just even with the helm.  It has three round openings, I assume for the kitchen exhaust.  None of them have screens so a mouse or rat could climb in and exit around the fan blades.


Has anyone found a good way to put a screen around it?  Or maybe feel that it's not needed?


Thanks,

Duane

Wanderer, SM#477


greatketch@...
 

The suggestion we got was to use metal screening on those vents, under the logo plate.  If the boat is closed tight, they offer the only access to the interior for a rat-sized rodent.  A mouse is small enough it probably has a few other options.

If on the other hand you are living on the boat with hatches and such open routinely, it is REALLY hard to be really rat-proof.  Bottles on the lines help and every little bit sure helps, but much of the time boats are close enough to the dock for a motivated rat to jump onto the deck if it is below dock level.

When I lived in the San Francisco area I knew a young German guy who kept a boat on a mooring in Hawaii.  He spent winters there, and summers working on boats in the Bay Area.  He went back to the boat one year and found a rat had gotten onboard, almost certainly climbing the mooring line after a long swim.  It did many thousands of dollars worth of damage to wiring, hoses, and woodwork before it died.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Great Guana Cay, Abacos, Bahamas


Duane Siegfri
 

Bill,

I tried to gently pry the Amel Logo/plastic piece off, but they used a good sealant on it and I think I'll do more harm than good.

It seems like I could take some screening and some silicone and just glue it on.  It would come off easily when it's full of lint or kitchen grease and then I could renew it with new screen and silicone...what do you think?

And..as much as you are on the move, how do you keep in touch?  I'd be interested in hearing how you do that.

Thanks for your reply!

Duane
Wanderer, SM#477


Duane Siegfri
 

By the way, Bill is right about a motivated rats jumping ability.

We have a net slung above the cabinet between the galley and the dining settee.  The rat has been feasting on the fruit and veggies in the net.  To reach, it has to jump a good 30' and then climb the netting.  I have the feeling that's not a tough job for it.

We've taken to calling him Sammy...not sure why but now that it's on the boat it needs a name.  Peg is sure it's a female and about to birth a litter of hundreds!!!!

Duane


Paul Osterberg
 

We have had a rat aboard on one of our previous boats, We notice one morning that it had eaten on all apples and most of the tomato’s. Obviously it had walked maybe 15 m on our stern line ( med mooring) aboard our vessel. We had it aboard for a few days before we got hold of a rat trap then We manage to caugt it with a standard spring rat trap rather easy.
From now one we always carry a rat trap. In the med we have on more than one occasion noticed  rat droppings in the cockpit, fortunately the rat has not been able to penetrate our moskito net. Have not thought of protecting the “entrance” behind the Amel logo.
Paul on SY Kerpa SM 259


Duane Siegfri
 

The thing that really amused me about this is the marina manager made a big point about "We do not have a rat problem", followed by their history of rat problems (building next door demolished, construction at the marina, etc.), so I noted that Wanderer has never had crew, much less a rat problem, but we do now after docking in your marina...

I think we're going to be friends.
Duane


Dean Gillies
 

This is how to catch Sammy.


Sent from my iPhone X


greatketch@...
 

Although rats do love to chew on things, they do not chew on metal. Unraveling a stainless steel pot scrubber, and stuffing in around the edges would make a pretty good barrier, not interfere with air flow, be cheap, and easy to renew if needed.

Here in the Bahamas, keeping connected while moving around is pretty easy.  We have a Batelco sim card for the phone, and have had a useful connection almost everywhere.  Most of the more popular anchorages on the populated islands have coverage by Bahamas Wireless, and, of course, if we are in a Marina, they usually have wifi.  

Other than the Bahamas, we have had good luck with local SIM cards, and wifi.  When we do come across a place without any connectivity... we relax and enjoy the peace!

For greater reach on our wifi signal, we have a Wirie range extender which works well. www.thewirie.com  
 
Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Great Guana Cay, Abacos, Bahamas