[Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Rats!


Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi,

Some years ago we were anchored at a Pacific Island (forget which) and we were approached by an owner from a nearby boat. He had a rat aboard his rather scruffy boat and wanted help with ideas of how to catch/remove said rat. He had tried traps and every thing else he could think of. We suggested the sticky trap popular as a household trap in the pacific and available at food stores. It is a board with adhesive on it. You place the bait in the middle. The rat walks on to it to get the bait and gets stuck. Then you pick up the board and dispose of the rat. I have seen it work in land base Bure accommodation. He had tried that. In the morning he found a sheet of paper over the adhesive and the bait gone. Now that was some rat!!

Regards

Danny

SM 299 Ocean Pearl

On 25 March 2018 at 13:35 "Trifin trifin@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

 

This is how to catch Sammy.

 


 


X


Duane Siegfri
 

Danny,

I certainly hope our rat doesn't have that advanced a degree in Trap Avoidance.  But now, we are going on 10 days since he chewed through a water hose under the galley sink so he may be of the same school.  We currently have three spring traps, 10 glue boards and one electrocution tunnel (I'm not kidding about that one, they had it at Lowes).

I think he's under the freezer (based on the fluffly insulation coming from there) and am thinking about a wild solution like flooding that space and then putting a gazillion volts to the water....or shotgun(s)...or maybe I need a vacation.

I did read this morning that one should not handle the traps without gloves since your skin oil will alert the rat to your plans.  I wish the manufacturers would have mentioned that one.  Mice didn't seem to care back in the midwest.

We're keeping the watertight bulkhead doors closed in hopes we can isolate him to the main cabin.  He could still find the conduit ways, but I've plugged them with copper pot scrubbers.  This is getting to be a protracted war.

By the way, we named him Sammy (remember the Rat Pack?).  That way Peg doesn't have to say the word "Rat".  Just saying the word makes her nauseous.  I might be living alone if Sammy doesn't take us up on one of our "presents".

Duane


Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Duane,

yes he was some rat. We told the unfortunate boat owner he was too valuable to kill. One that smart with training would have been worth a fortune. Seriously though. In Rural New Zealand rats are not uncommon. Mostly we keep them out of the house but occasionally in the winter they try to move in. We use a poison to kill them. It is a block bait and an important feature is that after taking the bait and before they die they get very thirsty so they leave the house to find water. Thus no smelly carcasses. So long as they didn't have access to water to drink on the boat I would expect they would leave the boat to find fresh water. Might be worth a try.

Kind Regards

Danny

SM 299 Ocean Pearl 

On 27 March 2018 at 13:15 "sailor63109@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Danny,


I certainly hope our rat doesn't have that advanced a degree in Trap Avoidance.  But now, we are going on 10 days since he chewed through a water hose under the galley sink so he may be of the same school.  We currently have three spring traps, 10 glue boards and one electrocution tunnel (I'm not kidding about that one, they had it at Lowes).

I think he's under the freezer (based on the fluffly insulation coming from there) and am thinking about a wild solution like flooding that space and then putting a gazillion volts to the water....or shotgun(s)...or maybe I need a vacation.

I did read this morning that one should not handle the traps without gloves since your skin oil will alert the rat to your plans.  I wish the manufacturers would have mentioned that one.  Mice didn't seem to care back in the midwest.

We're keeping the watertight bulkhead doors closed in hopes we can isolate him to the main cabin.  He could still find the conduit ways, but I've plugged them with copper pot scrubbers.  This is getting to be a protracted war.

By the way, we named him Sammy (remember the Rat Pack?).  That way Peg doesn't have to say the word "Rat".  Just saying the word makes her nauseous.  I might be living alone if Sammy doesn't take us up on one of our "presents".

Duane

 


 


Paul Osterberg
 

Duane!
Rats typically move close to the wall and avoid open space. When we had a rat aboard we caught him already the first night when we finally got a real spring rat trap.
We took away all rat goodies we could find. and set the trap with what we know rats likes, actually they like thing like mars bars or cheese. 
We put the trap in the galley bench along  the "wall"  then we put some obstruction along the wall to make some kind of a corridor the rat has to pas along to reach the goodies. We then took hide in the cock pit, after ca 10 minutes we heard the rat running along in the cabin.  Snapp the trap gone but no rat, as the rat came from the wrong direction in the corridor, we amended the corridor to a one way and in the second attempt we got him
Good luck
Paul on SY Kerpa SM#259


Craig Briggs
 

Hi Duane, 
If you Google "cuy recipes" you'll find some very tasty options for when you catch Sammy. We had cuy often in Ecuador and it does, indeed, taste just like "Sammy". The little cheeks are especially tasty,
Cheers, 
Craig SN#68