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[Amel Yacht Owners] How to flush Volvo D3-110i-C


Mohammad Shirloo
 

Hi Paul;
 
In order to get Kokomo ready for the winter, we flush out all of her raw water systems with fresh water for about 15 minutes. We accomplish this by turning off the main thru hull valve, removing the raw water strainer cover and supplying the systems with a fresh water hose. We turn on each system one by one, from the anchor wash, refrigerators, A/C, generator and finally the main engine. We are able to keep up with the water demand on all systems with a single 3/4" hose, except the main engine which we need two hoses for. We leave the raw water main valve closed for the winter.
 
This may not help in your situation if you have existing buildup, but I would assume that since recirculation of an agent like barnacle buster or saltaway may prove challenging, you would have to leave some kind of product within the system for some time to dislodge the buildup and then flush out. Off course some the dislodged items may create issues else where. Have you inspected your heat exchanger on the Volvo for buildup? This may explain some of your temperature rise.
 
Respectfully;
Mohammad Shirloo
323-633-2222 Cell
310-644-0908 Fax
 



From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Monday, June 18, 2018 10:07 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] How to flush Volvo D3-110i-C

 

Hi,

I'm looking for some advice on how to flush the raw water system on my Volvo D3-110i-C. I know it has debris/salt etc. build up because I can feel it crunching in the rubber hose when I squeeze it, and also the engine which normally runs a 78°C at 1250rpm is now running at 83°C or higher.

Any advice would be much appreciated.

Cheers,
Paul
Ya Fohi - Amrl 54 #98



karkauai
 

This is exactly what Barnacle Buster is supposed to help with. I have used it once a year since I bought the boat as directed, and all lines, etc appear to be completely free of scale or buildup.

Kent Robertson
S/V Kristy
SM244

On Jun 18, 2018, at 5:51 PM, 'Mohammad Shirloo' mshirloo@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi Paul;
 
In order to get Kokomo ready for the winter, we flush out all of her raw water systems with fresh water for about 15 minutes. We accomplish this by turning off the main thru hull valve, removing the raw water strainer cover and supplying the systems with a fresh water hose. We turn on each system one by one, from the anchor wash, refrigerators, A/C, generator and finally the main engine. We are able to keep up with the water demand on all systems with a single 3/4" hose, except the main engine which we need two hoses for. We leave the raw water main valve closed for the winter.
 
This may not help in your situation if you have existing buildup, but I would assume that since recirculation of an agent like barnacle buster or saltaway may prove challenging, you would have to leave some kind of product within the system for some time to dislodge the buildup and then flush out. Off course some the dislodged items may create issues else where. Have you inspected your heat exchanger on the Volvo for buildup? This may explain some of your temperature rise.
 
Respectfully;
Mohammad Shirloo
323-633-2222 Cell
310-644-0908 Fax
 


From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Monday, June 18, 2018 10:07 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] How to flush Volvo D3-110i-C

 

Hi,

I'm looking for some advice on how to flush the raw water system on my Volvo D3-110i-C. I know it has debris/salt etc. build up because I can feel it crunching in the rubber hose when I squeeze it, and also the engine which normally runs a 78°C at 1250rpm is now running at 83°C or higher.

Any advice would be much appreciated.

Cheers,
Paul
Ya Fohi - Amrl 54 #98



rossirossix4
 

Regarding fresh water flushes.  We also flush our entire system with fresh water (we do not have a loop for refrigerators but we also flush the pumps and lines to the toilets).  

However, we do this more frequently--when we are at the dock for more than a few days and even at anchor and sometimes we use the recommended mixture of Salt-A-Way.  We have been at the dock here at Cagliari for 8 days and will depart today--everything: Yanmar, Onan, AC, Anchor Wash, toilet pumps, and of course the sea chest and manifold have been in fresh water (measured at 140 ppm) the entire time.  Fresh water helps disolve deposits, prevents or kills marine growth, minimizes galvanic action.

We have a ball valve that isolates water from the manifold to the Dessalator.  When the Dessalator is flushed with fresh water, we let the water push back into the manifold and then shut the ball valve.  This keeps the supply hose to the low pressure pump in fresh water and prevents, say Salt-A-Way from entering the Dessalator system.

When we make water at anchor we usually divert the first few minutes of production into several 5 litre jugs that we keep on the engine room floor.  Usually this initial product has higher ppm and potential odor.  We use this same water to flush the generator/manifold etc. when we are finished.  It does not take much to flush the generator, manifold, engine, anchor wash.  We think it costs about $0.10/liter to make our own water so for a buck or 2 you have more than enough fresh water to do the job.

A couple of other actions regarding fresh water.  When we are at a dock and have been anchoring, we pull the chain out into a large rubber bucket that normally stores cleaning products and brushes.  We fill the bucket with fresh water and let the chain soak, change the water, and then let the chain dry on deck before it goes back into the chain locker.  Our guess is that most chain rust happens in the chain locker when the moist, salt laden chain sits there.  This may be another reason why the overhead of the chain locker deteriorates on some Amels. If we get a chance we also spray out the inside of the chain locker.

None of these actions seem burdensome to us.  If you build it into a routine, it is not complicated.  A side benefit is that they let us monitor how well the impellers and pumps are pulling water.

When underway we keep a large plastic bowl in our head sinks (the kind with a soft urethane bottom on the lower third of the bowl).  Most water is used for hand washing and face washing and that soapy water is just poured into the toilet and flushed....flushing it and keeping it in fresh water for periods of time as well.

Bob and Suzanne, KAIMI SM429
 


karkauai
 

All good ideas, Bob.  It is interesting that on Kristy, and other SMs I assume”, the drain for the chain locker is just below the “false floor” of the locker (not at the bottom of the locker).  I assume that is to prevent debris from clogging the drain.  The result is that water drains through the holes in the floor and sits in the bottom of the Vee of the hull.  It is not possible to drain that space without removing the chain and sucking the water out through one of the holes.  When my chain rusted into a solid ball, that Vee space was 2/3 full of bits of rust.  I cut a hole big enough to get a large shop vacuum hose in.  Then I replaced the cut out with a larger piece screwed to it to keep it from falling through the hole.
Bottom line is that there is always water in that space and always humidity in the locker.

Kent Robertson
S/V Kristy
SM 243

On Jun 19, 2018, at 1:24 AM, rossidesigngroup@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Regarding fresh water flushes.  We also flush our entire system with fresh water (we do not have a loop for refrigerators but we also flush the pumps and lines to the toilets).  


However, we do this more frequently--when we are at the dock for more than a few days and even at anchor and sometimes we use the recommended mixture of Salt-A-Way.  We have been at the dock here at Cagliari for 8 days and will depart today--everything: Yanmar, Onan, AC, Anchor Wash, toilet pumps, and of course the sea chest and manifold have been in fresh water (measured at 140 ppm) the entire time.  Fresh water helps disolve deposits, prevents or kills marine growth, minimizes galvanic action.

We have a ball valve that isolates water from the manifold to the Dessalator.  When the Dessalator is flushed with fresh water, we let the water push back into the manifold and then shut the ball valve.  This keeps the supply hose to the low pressure pump in fresh water and prevents, say Salt-A-Way from entering the Dessalator system.

When we make water at anchor we usually divert the first few minutes of production into several 5 litre jugs that we keep on the engine room floor.  Usually this initial product has higher ppm and potential odor.  We use this same water to flush the generator/manifold etc. when we are finished.  It does not take much to flush the generator, manifold, engine, anchor wash.  We think it costs about $0.10/liter to make our own water so for a buck or 2 you have more than enough fresh water to do the job.

A couple of other actions regarding fresh water.  When we are at a dock and have been anchoring, we pull the chain out into a large rubber bucket that normally stores cleaning products and brushes.  We fill the bucket with fresh water and let the chain soak, change the water, and then let the chain dry on deck before it goes back into the chain locker.  Our guess is that most chain rust happens in the chain locker when the moist, salt laden chain sits there.  This may be another reason why the overhead of the chain locker deteriorates on some Amels. If we get a chance we also spray out the inside of the chain locker.

None of these actions seem burdensome to us.  If you build it into a routine, it is not complicated.  A side benefit is that they let us monitor how well the impellers and pumps are pulling water.

When underway we keep a large plastic bowl in our head sinks (the kind with a soft urethane bottom on the lower third of the bowl).  Most water is used for hand washing and face washing and that soapy water is just poured into the toilet and flushed....flushing it and keeping it in fresh water for periods of time as well.

Bob and Suzanne, KAIMI SM429
 


 

Bob,

This is all good. Thanks. 


Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970


On Tue, Jun 19, 2018, 00:24 rossidesigngroup@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Regarding fresh water flushes.  We also flush our entire system with fresh water (we do not have a loop for refrigerators but we also flush the pumps and lines to the toilets).  


However, we do this more frequently--when we are at the dock for more than a few days and even at anchor and sometimes we use the recommended mixture of Salt-A-Way.  We have been at the dock here at Cagliari for 8 days and will depart today--everything: Yanmar, Onan, AC, Anchor Wash, toilet pumps, and of course the sea chest and manifold have been in fresh water (measured at 140 ppm) the entire time.  Fresh water helps disolve deposits, prevents or kills marine growth, minimizes galvanic action.

We have a ball valve that isolates water from the manifold to the Dessalator.  When the Dessalator is flushed with fresh water, we let the water push back into the manifold and then shut the ball valve.  This keeps the supply hose to the low pressure pump in fresh water and prevents, say Salt-A-Way from entering the Dessalator system.

When we make water at anchor we usually divert the first few minutes of production into several 5 litre jugs that we keep on the engine room floor.  Usually this initial product has higher ppm and potential odor.  We use this same water to flush the generator/manifold etc. when we are finished.  It does not take much to flush the generator, manifold, engine, anchor wash.  We think it costs about $0.10/liter to make our own water so for a buck or 2 you have more than enough fresh water to do the job.

A couple of other actions regarding fresh water.  When we are at a dock and have been anchoring, we pull the chain out into a large rubber bucket that normally stores cleaning products and brushes.  We fill the bucket with fresh water and let the chain soak, change the water, and then let the chain dry on deck before it goes back into the chain locker.  Our guess is that most chain rust happens in the chain locker when the moist, salt laden chain sits there.  This may be another reason why the overhead of the chain locker deteriorates on some Amels. If we get a chance we also spray out the inside of the chain locker.

None of these actions seem burdensome to us.  If you build it into a routine, it is not complicated.  A side benefit is that they let us monitor how well the impellers and pumps are pulling water.

When underway we keep a large plastic bowl in our head sinks (the kind with a soft urethane bottom on the lower third of the bowl).  Most water is used for hand washing and face washing and that soapy water is just poured into the toilet and flushed....flushing it and keeping it in fresh water for periods of time as well.

Bob and Suzanne, KAIMI SM429
 
< /p>


ya_fohi
 

Many thanks to all who replied for all your good avdvice. So on balance it looks like I need to circulate barnacle buster and/or saltaway through the the system from the raw water intake to the exhause elbow. So now the question is, do I do this by running the engine and therefore letting the impellor do the work, or do I use, say, a bulge pump sitting in a big bucket? If the latter then presumably I would need to first remove the impellor to allow the water through?

Cheers,
Paul
Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98


karkauai
 

I have just run the engine long enough to run BB through the raw water side, then shut down the engine and let it sit overnight.  Then run the engine with raw water to flush the B.B. out of the engine.  I haven’t done the circulation.  If I thought it still needed more treatment, I would treat again, or do the circulation treatment.

Kent Robertson
S/V Kristy
SM 243


Mark Erdos
 

Paul,

 

I do not think flushing the system as is or letting BB sit in the system is going to be adequate to clean the inside of the heat exchanger. If this is partially clogged it will need to be removed and visually inspected.

 

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, June 20, 2018 10:49 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] How to flush Volvo D3-110i-C

 

 

Many thanks to all who replied for all your good avdvice. So on balance it looks like I need to circulate barnacle buster and/or saltaway through the the system from the raw water intake to the exhause elbow. So now the question is, do I do this by running the engine and therefore letting the impellor do the work, or do I use, say, a bulge pump sitting in a big bucket? If the latter then presumably I would need to first remove the impellor to allow the water through?

 

Cheers,

Paul

Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98


ya_fohi
 

Mark,

I have decided to at least try BB first rather than spend $$$ straight away. One question: how long should BB be allowed to sit in the system? I don't want to risk any damage it may cause if left too long.

Cheers,
Paul
Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98


karkauai
 

I would call and ask them.
 954-987-2722
info “at” trac-online “dot” com

My understanding is that B.B. is not damaging to your engine, but there is nothing to that effect on their website.  I leave it for 6-12 hours 1-2 times a year with no discernible adverse effects after several years.  I’m guessing it will take more than one treatment.  You should flush your other seawater systems at the same time (AC, heads if they come off the sea chest manifold, water maker...don’t allow B.B. to get to the membranes).

Kent
SM 243
Kristy


ya_fohi
 

Thanks Kent that’s useful info.


ya_fohi
 

Hi all,

I thought I'd post a follow up on this for those who are interested. I pulled a 3:1 solution of BB through the engine and let it stand for 24 hours. Result: problem solved, engine temp is back to normal - 79 - 80°@ 2250rpm.

Thanks to all for the advice.

Cheers,
Paul
Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98