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Cam lock on main halyard?


Peter de Groot
 

Another beginners question:

During our last outing on La Querida (SM 207) upon deploying, the middle vertical batten on the mail sail had broke through the pocket and was dangling 3/4 out.  Seas were moderate and the wind was averaging 15 knots.  I was attempting to rescue the batten and had to untie the Alpine butterfly loop (lineman's loop) on the main halyard in order to lower it where the batten was within reach.  This knot was at the limit of my out-stretched arms, and difficult to untie in that position.  I was finally able to untie the knot and drop the halyard.  Batten rescued! (the complete sequence was: unfurl, detect problem, partial furl, untie knot on halyard, unfurl, lower halyard. rescue batten, etc.)


 OK that got me concerned....what if it was really rough?  What if there was some other malfunction (where furling was not an option) that required dropping the main quickly.....

I was recalling the camlocks on the halyards on the race boats I used to crew an wondering if that wouldn't be a reasonable option for the SM.


Has anyone considered or installed another method to secure the main halyard other than the pinned slide on the track?  Is there a better knot that releases quickly while working at the limit of ones reach?  Or is this beginner missing something else that's obvious?


Thanks in advance,

Peter de Groot

La Querida #207

Moss Landing, CA 


Alan Leslie
 

Peter,
On my boat, the main halyard exits the mast and is attached to the car on the short track with a bowline. The tail of the bowline dangles below the car and ends in another bowline. The trick is to attach another long line with a bowline to that lower bowline, put the new line on the winch and winch it down slightly so that you can get the top bowline off the hook on the car. now you can release the line and feed the knots through the slot in the mast as the halyard goes up and the sail comes down.
With practice it's not hard.
If you have a ripped batten pocket it sounds like you need to take that sail to a sailmaker and have him go over it and repair any suspect spots.
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Alan Leslie
 

Hello Peter again,

Regarding your batten having "broken through" the pocket...
We have a vertical battened main and the pockets are such that the batten is inserted upwards towards the leech of the sail, there is then a tail on the batten pocket with a velcro strip on it, which is pushed over the end of the batten and  into the batten pocket with a "pusher" (which is just a piece of batten shaped to fit the cap on the batten pocket tail), it should stay there...if your batten has come out, then maybe the velcro needs replacing....or the tail of the batten pocket is badly damaged and needs replacing
In any event you should probably have a sailmaker give the sail a good looking at.
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Peter de Groot
 

Thank you Alan. The part I was missing is letting the knot go through the slot in the mast. I will experiment this weekend.
Regarding the bottom batten pocket of the main. I’m planning to get a new sail before we cruise. The leech of the current sail is not in the best of shape. I have not helped it with some of my clumsy furling. It frequently hangs up while unfurling


Peter de Groot
 

Thank you Alan,
Yes the leech of the main is already in bad shape. It tends to fold over when furling. The last 2 or 3 feet don’t straighten out until sailing some distance. I’ve had the leech line replaced and I have a new bungee that still needs to be installed. I’m planning to work a Santa Cruz sail loft when it’s time to order a new main. Your comments are appreciated.

Btw: my main halyard is full length which prompted the cam lock question

Best
Peter
La Querida sm 207