Topics

[Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Interior wood quality

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi. Be encouraged Paul. Plywood is much stronger than solid timber because of the grains in each ply lying differently. And good Maine ply uses very good glues to hold it together

Regards

Danny

SM 299

Ocean pearl

On 21 September 2018 at 15:40 "Paul Stascavage pstas2003@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Thanks Kent and thank you to you as well Alan. I don't know why, but for some reason I thought everything was solid Mahogany.

Looking more closely at the hand holds it is evident that the bulk heads are not.

I learn so much being a part of this forum, but this is one piece of information I almost wish I missed.

All the best,

Paul
SM #466
S/V Rita Kathryn
Cruising New England



 


 

 

I once was with the largest group of furniture manufacturers in the US. We owned companies like Drexel Heritage and Henredon. I would place Amel's interior construction and finish with some of the best.

I saw an Amel light-finish interior. I didn't like the appearance because it was plain and plastic-looking. The species of wood and veneer Amel used with this "light finish" had very little character. It almost looked artificial, similar to a manufactured laminate. There are people who prefer this stark neutral look and that market is growing. Possibly this is what was referred to earlier. 

There is no way to get the beauty and character of the Amel interior without using veneers. Also, it is evident that someone at Amel has excellent skills  in the initial selection and layout of veneer  

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970

On Thu, Sep 20, 2018, 23:13 Danny and Yvonne SIMMS simms@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Hi. Be encouraged Paul. Plywood is much stronger than solid timber because of the grains in each ply lying differently. And good Maine ply uses very good glues to hold it together

Regards

Danny

SM 299

Ocean pearl

On 21 September 2018 at 15:40 "Paul Stascavage pstas2003@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Thanks Kent and thank you to you as well Alan. I don't know why, but for some reason I thought everything was solid Mahogany.

Looking more closely at the hand holds it is evident that the bulk heads are not.

I learn so much being a part of this forum, but this is one piece of information I almost wish I missed.

All the best,

Paul
SM #466
S/V Rita Kathryn
Cruising New England



 


 

greatketch@...
 

If anyone repaired sun fading of the interior mahogany, is the fading shallow enough that there is a chance of sanding to fresh wood without going through the veneer?

We have some fading right around the cabin side deadlights.  It would be easy enough to re-veneer if needed... but I am kind of hoping it is I can squeak by without that...

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


karkauai
 

On Kristy the veneer on the panels around the port lights is ~1mm thick.  Careful sanding shouldn’t be a problem.

Kent
S/V Kristy
SM243

On Sep 21, 2018, at 11:11 AM, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

If anyone repaired sun fading of the interior mahogany, is the fading shallow enough that there is a chance of sanding to fresh wood without going through the veneer?


We have some fading right around the cabin side deadlights.  It would be easy enough to re-veneer if needed... but I am kind of hoping it is I can squeak by without that...

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


Mark Erdos
 

Bill,

 

I have done some extensive interior boat reconditioning since I once refitted an old Cheoy Lee. Matching faded teak panels was unfortunately something I became quite good at. There are many products on the market to help do this. My favorites were varnish and polyurethane finishes that contained tint or where tint could be added. With a little bit of patience and mixing, matching the finish with additional top coating can be accomplished.

 

Also, I would not recommend sanding any veneer product to remove the existing finish. A chemical stripper will give much more control and protect the mahogany veneer should you find it necessary to remove the old finish. Hopefully you can get by with a light hand sand and a couple of additional top coats.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Bonaire

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Friday, September 21, 2018 11:11 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Interior wood quality

 

 

If anyone repaired sun fading of the interior mahogany, is the fading shallow enough that there is a chance of sanding to fresh wood without going through the veneer?

 

We have some fading right around the cabin side deadlights.  It would be easy enough to re-veneer if needed... but I am kind of hoping it is I can squeak by without that...

 

Bill Kinney

SM160, Harmonie

Annapolis, MD, USA

 

 

 

Bill,

Furniture refinishers do this quite often. You have to remove the varnish and stain edge to edge because you simply cannot feather-in a repair. It doesn't have to be sanded, most refinishers remove the finish, then sand, restain, then spray a varnish finish. I don't think that I would try to apply finish with a brush, but I know some people do this. Low humidity inside your boat is imperative when applying finish. If you spray the finish, respirator masks and exhaust ventilation should be used. I would consider this a big job and consider hanging (attaching) something on the wall to hide the spot.

HINT TO NEW AMEL OWNERS: Don't hang anything on that beautiful wall as you will have a spot to contend with when you sell your Amel.
 
Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970

Any opinions and conclusions expressed in this message are solely those of the author and should not be construed as representing the opinion of an expert. Manufacturers' and Expert's precautions must be considered when dealing with mechanical and/or electrical systems to ensure that you are NOT harmed, and/or the device and/or system is NOT ruined. If in doubt, do not touch any mechanical and/or electrical device or system referred to above.


On Fri, Sep 21, 2018 at 10:25 AM Kent Robertson karkauai@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

On Kristy the veneer on the panels around the port lights is ~1mm thick.  Careful sanding shouldn’t be a problem.

Kent
S/V Kristy
SM243

On Sep 21, 2018, at 11:11 AM, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

If anyone repaired sun fading of the interior mahogany, is the fading shallow enough that there is a chance of sanding to fresh wood without going through the veneer?


We have some fading right around the cabin side deadlights.  It would be easy enough to re-veneer if needed... but I am kind of hoping it is I can squeak by without that....

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


greatketch@...
 

Thanks Marc & Kent,

A chemical strip certainly does sound like the best way to start.  In this case the finish is mechanically sound, but the wood underneath has gone from rich brown to pale yellow.  I am assuming that the mahogany is similar to teak, in that the sun faded wood is very thin, and very light sanding will restore it to its original appearance.

I have gotten pretty good at matching the "look" of the Amel finish, although it it a very time consuming process! I would never try to patch the middle of a panel, but for individual parts it can be done pretty well.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


---In amelyachtowners@..., <mcerdos@...> wrote :

Bill,

 

I have done some extensive interior boat reconditioning since I once refitted an old Cheoy Lee. Matching faded teak panels was unfortunately something I became quite good at. There are many products on the market to help do this. My favorites were varnish and polyurethane finishes that contained tint or where tint could be added. With a little bit of patience and mixing, matching the finish with additional top coating can be accomplished.

 

Also, I would not recommend sanding any veneer product to remove the existing finish. A chemical stripper will give much more control and protect the mahogany veneer should you find it necessary to remove the old finish. Hopefully you can get by with a light hand sand and a couple of additional top coats.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Bonaire

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Friday, September 21, 2018 11:11 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Interior wood quality

 

 

If anyone repaired sun fading of the interior mahogany, is the fading shallow enough that there is a chance of sanding to fresh wood without going through the veneer?

 

We have some fading right around the cabin side deadlights.  It would be easy enough to re-veneer if needed... but I am kind of hoping it is I can squeak by without that...

 

Bill Kinney

SM160, Harmonie

Annapolis, MD, USA

 

 

James Alton
 

Hi Bill,

  We have owned a number of classic wooden vessels with lots of exterior varnishwork along with customer boats with even more.  Mahogany (especially African and Phillipine) tend to lighten and turn sort of a blonde colour when exposed to UV for a while.  We often used a filler stain on the wood under the first coats to help stabilize the colour.  I don't think that Amel stained the wood in our boat however which actually makes repairs easier. When the wood colour changes on the exterior trim, you don't notice this too much when all of the finish is exposed and aging at the same rate but if you have a damaged area to repair it will be quite noticeable if stripped bare to the original colour.  The repair will slowly begin to blend in with the rest as time passes.  We have stripped down a number of areas of varnish on SUENO and restored them.  Perhaps the situation in our case might be similar to yours.  The interior as a whole looks great (little to no colour change detectable to my eye) except for the openings where the UV has gotten in through ports and hatches and those are the areas being refinished.  The good news about wood is that the UV damage tends to be very superficial so careful removal of just the finish by mechanical means such as dry scraping (good scrapers and lots of care) followed by a light sanding with fairly fine paper say 220 and up is enough to restore the original colour of the wood.  The areas that we have refinished to date using Epifanes clear varnish have blended in pretty nice so far.  It is very important to keep in mind that you are working mostly on thin veeners so be super careful not to gouge and only hand sand around radiused areas to carefully control the rate of wood removal to the minimum.  We keep the curtains closed for the most part and also have covers for all of the hatches that are used when the boat is in storage.  Varnish lasts almost forever if you can protect it from the UV.  Best of luck to you.

James Alton
SV Sueno
Bizerete, Tunisia

Sent from Samsung tablet.

-------- Original message --------
From: "greatketch@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...>
Date: 9/21/18 16:11 (GMT+01:00)
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Interior wood quality

 

If anyone repaired sun fading of the interior mahogany, is the fading shallow enough that there is a chance of sanding to fresh wood without going through the veneer?


We have some fading right around the cabin side deadlights.  It would be easy enough to re-veneer if needed... but I am kind of hoping it is I can squeak by without that...

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


greatketch@...
 

James,

Thanks--exactly what I was looking for.  I have had a lot of practice with a cabinet scraper which will transfer well.

We see very much what you describe with the fading of the wood around the port lights.  We'd like to keep everything covered more, but we live on the boat full time so that is not always possible.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA

james Hosford
 

Thanks Bill,  i agree i dont care for the light wood option in the new 55s,  but thats ok those are way out of my budget any way.  Was mostly interested in the difference between the sm and the 54 do prefer the dark wood and the more white fabrics of the 54 but wasn't sure if the 54 was as tried and true as the sm.   Some things quality goes down as you get newer    


On Sep 21, 2018, at 8:25 AM, Bill Rouse brouse@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

I once was with the largest group of furniture manufacturers in the US. We owned companies like Drexel Heritage and Henredon. I would place Amel's interior construction and finish with some of the best.

I saw an Amel light-finish interior. I didn't like the appearance because it was plain and plastic-looking. The species of wood and veneer Amel used with this "light finish" had very little character. It almost looked artificial, similar to a manufactured laminate. There are people who prefer this stark neutral look and that market is growing. Possibly this is what was referred to earlier. 

There is no way to get the beauty and character of the Amel interior without using veneers. Also, it is evident that someone at Amel has excellent skills  in the initial selection and layout of veneer  

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970

On Thu, Sep 20, 2018, 23:13 Danny and Yvonne SIMMS simms@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Hi. Be encouraged Paul. Plywood is much stronger than solid timber because of the grains in each ply lying differently. And good Maine ply uses very good glues to hold it together

Regards

Danny

SM 299

Ocean pearl

On 21 September 2018 at 15:40 "Paul Stascavage pstas2003@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Thanks Kent and thank you to you as well Alan. I don't know why, but for some reason I thought everything was solid Mahogany.

Looking more closely at the hand holds it is evident that the bulk heads are not.

I learn so much being a part of this forum, but this is one piece of information I almost wish I missed.

All the best,

Paul
SM #466
S/V Rita Kathryn
Cruising New England



 


 

James Alton
 

Bill,

   Great!  Sorry for the delayed response, we have been on the move headed South down the Tunisian coast.

   If you have any problems getting the new varnish to blend in or whatever we are glad to share our techniques.  

   I really appreciate your post on the bow thruster wiring upgrades that you did.  I will closely duplicate your efforts on Sueno as soon as I can get to that task.   In the meantime, we always remove the chain from the gypsy to at least reduce one of the concerns with the original setup.

Best,

James and Joann
SV Sueno
Maramu #220
Hammamet, Tunisia


Sent from Samsung tablet.

-------- Original message --------
From: "greatketch@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...>
Date: 9/26/18 01:21 (GMT+01:00)
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Interior wood quality

 

James,


Thanks--exactly what I was looking for.  I have had a lot of practice with a cabinet scraper which will transfer well.

We see very much what you describe with the fading of the wood around the port lights.  We'd like to keep everything covered more, but we live on the boat full time so that is not always possible.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA