Head sail furling, Heading to S Pacific


Miles
 

HI Kent,

 

I don’t remember if I added another outboard block back near the winch.  I don’t think so.  There should not be much force on the line and I usually pulled it in manually—at least after the initial furling.  The loops over the winch keep it from unfurling again when you stop pulling.   If you are sailing partly furled, you will want to use the small winch.

 

Miles

 

s/y Ladybug


Miles
 

Hi Kent,

 

I will try to draw a sketch.   I recall that I put two blocks on the first or second starboard station base.  The lines then run straight down the deck and attach to the bungee that continues to the big aft cleat.   I found that I had to tie the knot just aft of the forward block on the line that would be running aft as the sail furled so it didn’t run through a block.   I am a bit fuzzy as I last used this about 15 years ago after the motor drive plate came adrift.

 

Carol sends her best and she and I hope to meet Iris someday.

 

Miles

 

s/y Ladybug, sm 216


Miles
 

Hi Kent,

 

Your upcoming adventures sound wonderful.  I am a bit jealous.

 

Re: the furling, Ladybug came with a long black and white furling line.  I am not on the boat so I don’t know what it is.  It may well be polyester.  It is the same line that attaches to the main halyard to allow dropping the sail.   This line goes around the furler, then to two blocks on the front starboard side and back along the deck.  The elastic bungee that holds the passerelle attaches to the rear starboard cleat.  Another block attaches to the bungee and to the furling line that is now tied into one big loop.  Take several loops around the main winch or the small  winch.  The bungee provides sufficient tension (not a lot) for rolling in the sail.   I have only used this once and it worked very well.  It didn’t slip on the furler.

 

Please ask me questions if this is not clear.  I will be back on the boat in 10 days and will be more helpful then.

 

Regards and fair winds,

 

Miles

 s/y Ladybug, SM 216  lying in Le Marin, Martinique


karkauai
 

Hi Danny,
Thanks, I’ll experiment a bit and let the group know what I figure out.

Yes we are finally starting our SPac cruise, first leg to Turks and Caicos, thru the Caribbean, Belize, Panama, and thru the Canal.  Will probably go S this Summer to Ecuador and spend some time in S America, then on to the S Pac next Spring.

It seems that no matter how much prep is done, there are always delays like this jib furler problem.  I’m trying not to get too frustrated and hope that finances don’t cut our journey short.

Iris is a good sport and contributes greatly to my state of mind.  She’s also got a great mind for problem-solving and we are becoming a good team. I’m confident we will be in your neck of the woods in a few years as long as the finances don’t give out.

All the best,
Kent & Iris
Kristy
SM 243


On Jan 3, 2019, at 1:53 PM, Danny Simms sailorman.ds@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi Kent,
I haven't had to use it so can't answer the tension thing, but if you consider the posts on the  mainsail out-haul it would seem that more tension would help.Likewise the type of rope could be an issue. Ordinary polyester braid would be good for this application since stretch is not an issue. For tension I could imagine a few wraps on the idle winch and holding the tail in one hand while grinding on the other winch with the self tailer engaged would be the method but of course for me that is but a theory.
All the best for the new year. Are you still planning voyaging to the South Pacific?
Regards
Danny
SM 299
Ocean Pearl
Mangonui New Zealand 

On Fri, 4 Jan 2019 at 03:49, Kent Robertson karkauai@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Yes, Danny, the line is crossed after it leaves the drum.  Do I have to keep a lot of pressure on both sides of the line while furling and unfurling?  When single-handing, cranking on one side, tailing on the other side, and tailing the sheet to get a reasonably tight furl leaves me one hand short.  Admittedly, I’ve only tried it a couple of times so I may not have figured out something obvious.  What’s the trick?

Thank you Duane, I’ll let you know what I find...hope that’s the problem!
Kent & Iris
Kristy
SM243



On Jan 3, 2019, at 3:10 AM, simms@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi Kent, when you run the manual furling line do you cross it after it leaves the pulley on the forestay. If not you are losing a big part if the rope/ pulley contact friction.
Regards
Danny
SM 299 
Ocean Pearl

On 3/01/2019 08:12, "greatketch@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Kent,


Before you condemn the gearing inside the box, be sure that the drive pin in the furling drum is fully engaging in the drive plate that is mounted on top of the gearbox.  We had our drive plate blow apart a few years ago, and other people have had trouble with the hole rounding over and pushing the pin up.  That sounds like the more likely cause.

Having just had our furling gearbox apart for routine maintenance, I think it very unlikely that the gearing inside the gearbox is the problem.  Certainly possible, but unlikely given what you describe as symptoms.

For the manual furling line, we have 10mm double braid dacron.  That worked great for us on the two occasions we needed it.  I wonder if the StaySet might be too stiff?  7/16" would not be too big.

If you need this unit disassembled and looked at, you might try Nance and Underwood, riggers in Fort Lauderdale.  They know Amel's very well, and Roger Underwood has been a help when we have used him.  If you need a new drive plate, I know they can make one for you.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA