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Engine room lining on Amel 54


Martin Bevan
 

The black covering on the engine room sound proofing on my 54 has peeled off in a number of patches. Has anyone experience of successfully repairing this without replacing the complete sound proofing?  

I think I remember seeing something on this years ago but cannot find it in the group. 


 

Martin,

There is probably not an easy solution to the problem with 54 sound insulation. When Amel started producing the 54, they decided to change material from the charcoal colored un-coated egg-crate-cut foam used in the Super Maramu to this new material. This new material used in the 54 looked great when new, but unfortunately, the nice looking black film coating on the foam deteriorates with time. I am not sure what causes the deterioration, but obviously it was the wrong choice.

I asked Amel SAV about this issue for my 54 clients. I was told, "
The black film of the insulation foam is a cosmetic finishing and protect the insulation foam from degradation. When this film or foam starts to peel off there is no other choice that to replace the section affected or to reglue on it an another thin foam sheet . Depending the place this operation is not easy to perform as the foam is fitted prior any equipment is installed in engine room. The foam is glued originally with some neoprene (glue)."

What Amel is saying that you have to remove all of the equipment in the engine room to do a replacement of the insulation, and even then, it is difficult for the untrained person. Although it is not a perfect solution, peeling off the film  from the foam may be the best thing you can do without removing almost all of the equipment.

Best,

Bill Rouse
720 Winnie St.
Galveston, Texas 77550
832-380-4970



On Fri, Mar 15, 2019 at 7:45 AM Martin Bevan <Martin.bevanhome@...> wrote:
The black covering on the engine room sound proofing on my 54 has peeled off in a number of patches. Has anyone experience of successfully repairing this without replacing the complete sound proofing?  

I think I remember seeing something on this years ago but cannot find it in the group. 


ngtnewington Newington
 

Hi Martin,

I have the same issue on my 54. I have found that by using a vacuum cleaner I can suck off the film leaving the bare foam behind. It works pretty well and looks fine afterwards. The foam insulation itself is still well attached to the bulkheads.
Nick

Amelia Aml 54 019

On 15 Mar 2019, at 13:45, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:

Martin,

There is probably not an easy solution to the problem with 54 sound insulation. When Amel started producing the 54, they decided to change material from the charcoal colored un-coated egg-crate-cut foam used in the Super Maramu to this new material. This new material used in the 54 looked great when new, but unfortunately, the nice looking black film coating on the foam deteriorates with time. I am not sure what causes the deterioration, but obviously it was the wrong choice.

I asked Amel SAV about this issue for my 54 clients. I was told, "
The black film of the insulation foam is a cosmetic finishing and protect the insulation foam from degradation. When this film or foam starts to peel off there is no other choice that to replace the section affected or to reglue on it an another thin foam sheet . Depending the place this operation is not easy to perform as the foam is fitted prior any equipment is installed in engine room. The foam is glued originally with some neoprene (glue)."

What Amel is saying that you have to remove all of the equipment in the engine room to do a replacement of the insulation, and even then, it is difficult for the untrained person. Although it is not a perfect solution, peeling off the film  from the foam may be the best thing you can do without removing almost all of the equipment.

Best,

Bill Rouse
720 Winnie St.
Galveston, Texas 77550
832-380-4970



On Fri, Mar 15, 2019 at 7:45 AM Martin Bevan <Martin.bevanhome@...> wrote:
The black covering on the engine room sound proofing on my 54 has peeled off in a number of patches. Has anyone experience of successfully repairing this without replacing the complete sound proofing?  

I think I remember seeing something on this years ago but cannot find it in the group. 




Arno Luijten
 

The black film deteriorates much faster in the tropics. Mine is almost completely gone but that is because I used a vacuum cleaner to get it off. I hated to be covered in black flakes everytime I entered the engine bay.

I’m thinking about using some dinghy-paint to redcoat the foam, using a paint roller. Let me know what you think.

Arno Luijten
SV Luna,
A54-121


ngtnewington Newington
 

Hi Arno,

I would be interested to know how you get on with the paint. When you say dinghy paint. What paint exactly?
Also in your other post you said you bought membranes for the water maker for 160 euro. Could you send a link for them. My membranes are fine at the moment but at that price it might be worth changing them anyway.

Nick

Amelia A54-019

On 15 Mar 2019, at 16:00, Arno Luijten <arno.luijten@...> wrote:

The black film deteriorates much faster in the tropics. Mine is almost completely gone but that is because I used a vacuum cleaner to get it off. I hated to be covered in black flakes everytime I entered the engine bay.

I’m thinking about using some dinghy-paint to redcoat the foam, using a paint roller. Let me know what you think.

Arno Luijten
SV Luna,
A54-121


Courtney Gorman
 

One thing not to do is to try and cover it up with either black duct tape or black gorilla tape this is what was done in my boat before I bought it to make it look nice however the weight of the tape and the fact that much of it is applied to thin blackFilm on the soundproofing causes it to fall off in big chunks and make a big mess I think the best idea is to remove it all has been stated before with the vacuum cleaner and then possibly there’s some type of material we could then paint or seal it with maybe something on the lines of rhino liner

On Mar 15, 2019, at 12:00 PM, Arno Luijten <arno.luijten@...> wrote:

The black film deteriorates much faster in the tropics. Mine is almost completely gone but that is because I used a vacuum cleaner to get it off. I hated to be covered in black flakes everytime I entered the engine bay.

I’m thinking about using some dinghy-paint to redcoat the foam, using a paint roller. Let me know what you think.

Arno Luijten
SV Luna,
A54-121


Mark & Debbie Mueller
 

We have the same problem, black dandruff coming off everywhere.  I believe the idea was to provide a water and oil resistant surface in the equipment space.  Good idea by Amel, poorly executed.  To that end I have used the Flex Seal spray on product, it seems to work well so far.  Like others I have had to remove the duct tape applied over the original black coating by the prior owner.  I don’t understand why anyone would think applying tape over a surface that is falling off would accomplish anything.  Oh well……

 

Mark Mueller

Brass Ring  A54


Theo s/v Paloma
 
Edited

Is the A54 lining same as the one in the picture below?

If yes, Amel is still using the same lining on the A50... In which case, I would like to find a way to slow down or prevent deterioration. Also, they probably used the same on the A55 and A64.

s/v Paloma
2019 A50, #18


Courtney Gorman
 

Looks the same as my 54


On Mar 18, 2019, at 1:29 AM, s/v Paloma <sailingpaloma1@...> wrote:

[Edited Message Follows]

Is the A54 lining same as the one in the picture below?

If yes, Amel is still using the same lining on the A50... In which case, I would like to find a way to slow down or prevent deterioration. Also, they probably used the same on the A55 and A64.

s/v Paloma
2019 A50, #18


Theo s/v Paloma
 

Great... I'm surprised that Amel did not improved the material. 


 

Theo,

I am not so sure that the 50 has the same insulation material, even though it looks similar. You can verify by asking your contact at Amel. For several reasons, I believe that the material was changed sometime during the 55 production.

Is that engine room photo a random Amel 50 in production, or is that Poloma in production?

Best,

Bill Rouse
720 Winnie St.
Galveston, Texas 77550
832-380-4970



On Tue, Mar 19, 2019 at 11:18 AM s/v Paloma <sailingpaloma1@...> wrote:
Great... I'm surprised that Amel did not improved the material. 


Scott SV Tengah
 

I had the same problem and found this stuff in Spain. 

It's insulation material with very sticky backing and a "mesh" through it to prevent tearing. It's foam but feels a bit like neoprene. Certainly makes things look a lot better but as the original black film coating starts peeling off, parts of the added covering start coming off.

I think if I find a way to anchor it to the foam substrate in the same way that upholstery is secured to a couch, it may be perfect. This photo is what I'm thinking.
https://img-aws.ehowcdn.com/350x235p/s3-us-west-1.amazonaws.com/contentlab.studiod/getty/261051e9af6048798eb32f1a6f934f78.jpg

Scott
SV Tengah Amel 54 2007


Theo s/v Paloma
 

Bill,

The picture is of Paloma getting built. One more month till handover.

Theo.
s/v Paloma
A50 #18


Martin Bevan
 

Thank you for all the responses about the engine room.  I tried the plastic paint suggestion. Plasti Dip is available in the UK. It comes as a spray or brush on and there are the appropriate thinners and a primer for use on non-porous surfaces. It adheres well to the raw foam and 2-3 coats brushed on has given a tough surface. It is too early to say how well it will last. It certainly improves the appearance of the engine room, even just patching in. 


 


Please keep us posted as to how this works. Every 54 owner will be very interested.

Best,

Bill Rouse
720 Winnie St.
Galveston, Texas 77550
832-380-4970



On Sun, May 26, 2019 at 6:03 AM Martin Bevan <Martin.bevanhome@...> wrote:
Thank you for all the responses about the engine room.  I tried the plastic paint suggestion. Plasti Dip is available in the UK. It comes as a spray or brush on and there are the appropriate thinners and a primer for use on non-porous surfaces. It adheres well to the raw foam and 2-3 coats brushed on has given a tough surface. It is too early to say how well it will last. It certainly improves the appearance of the engine room, even just patching in.