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Important - Amel 54 and any Electrical Emergency #IMPORTANT


 

All,
 
I have always recommended, if an Electrical Emergency happens aboard your Amel, the Main Battery Switches should be immediately turned OFF (opened). I have also urged owners to discuss this with crew and especially guests.
 
Something has come to my attention that surprised me. The 24 volt alternator on Amel 54s, and possibly other Amels, is wired to the 24 Volt Panel side of the Main Battery Switches. This means, if engine is running and you turn OFF the Main Battery Switches, all of the 24 volt devices will continue to get 24 volt power because the 24 volt alternator is generating power and is connected to the 24 volt panel side of the Main Battery Switches. When this recently happened to a client, I was also surprised that the Volvo D3 continued to run with the Main Battery Switches OFF because the D3 needs 12 volts to run. I suspect the D3 was getting current to run from its 12 volt alternator, but that surprises me also.
 
This is really important that you understand the Main Battery Switches will disconnect the batteries, but not the 24 volt alternator. In the case of the Amel 54, and possibly other Amels, to turn OFF 24 volt power, the Volvo D3 must be OFF as well as the the Main Battery Switches set to OFF.
 
I am sure that we all would like to know about other model Amels. I do not recommend turning off the switches with the engine running, but rather tracing the wiring.
 
Best,
 
Bill Rouse
Yacht School  
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970


Dean Gillies
 

Thanks for promulgating that warning Bill, a timely reminder to all.

What you describe is exactly how my 54 #154 is configured. It is also documented as such in the circuit schematics in the  owner’s manual.
Im pretty sure all of my previous boats were also configured in this way.
I suppose “battery isolation switches’ do exactly as their name implies - they isolate the batteries. Everything else stays connected together.
Best regards
Dean
SY Stella A54-154
A Coruña 


Dean Gillies
 

Another important point to note is that Solar regulators should preferably be connected to the ‘panel side’ of the battery isolator switches.  (For the same reasons).  However, this means that battery isolator switches must be left on when solar charging is wanted, eg during wintering. For this reason, I suspect many folks will connect the solar regulator to the battery side. Noting of course that the solar system should always incorporate breakers on the panel and battery side of the regulator.
All interesting issues to consider when briefing crew etc.
Dean


Arno Luijten
 

Hi Dean,

Are you sure the schema in the handbook is correct? Mine is not. The batteries are shown in two different pages, both of them are incorrect. One is the one that shows both the 12 v and the 24 v battery, this one is really incorrect, the other shows the 24 volt circuit with the batteries, this one is more accurate but still wrong.

Arno,
SV Luna
A54-121


 

Arno,

I apologize, I omitted giving you credit for the 54 wiring photo. Thanks!

Best,

Bill Rouse
720 Winnie St.
Galveston, Texas 77550
832-380-4970



On Sun, May 26, 2019 at 4:28 PM Arno Luijten <arno.luijten@...> wrote:
Hi Dean,

Are you sure the schema in the handbook is correct? Mine is not. The batteries are shown in two different pages, both of them are incorrect. One is the one that shows both the 12 v and the 24 v battery, this one is really incorrect, the other shows the 24 volt circuit with the batteries, this one is more accurate but still wrong.

Arno,
SV Luna
A54-121



Dean Gillies
 

Hi Arno,
I’m 99% sure, I will dig out the manual and post a pic when we are in port later today.
Best regards
Dean


Dean Gillies
 

Hi Arno,
You are quite correct. The schematics are inconsistent, and as you say the “General Overview” and “24V Circuit” don’t agree in a few areas, however they do both show the 24V alternator on the panel side of the isolator switches, which was Bill’s particular area of concern.

The obvious errors I can see are:

1. The 220V charging is shown as connected directly to the batteries on the Circuit page, but is shown on the other side of the isolator switches on the Overview page. Which is correct?

2. The main engine and generator starters are both shown on the 24v circuit in the Circuit page, I’m sure these operate from the 12v batteries as shown on the Overview page.

There are likely to be some other errors too. I have learned over the years to be wary of boat documentation and Amel documentation seems no different. 

Attached are the two pages for reference.

Cheers
Dean


Oliver Henrichsen, SV Vela Nautica
 

If I am not mistaken, some solar and windregulators need to be permanent connected to the batterie BEFORE any power is applied from pannel or windgen.
If batterie is disconnected it will destroy the regulators. 
So read manuals on which side of the switch the regulator has to be connected. 

Oliver from Vela Nautica 54#39
Faro Portugal 

On Sun, May 26, 2019, 21:23 SY STELLA <stella@...> wrote:
Another important point to note is that Solar regulators should preferably be connected to the ‘panel side’ of the battery isolator switches.  (For the same reasons).  However, this means that battery isolator switches must be left on when solar charging is wanted, eg during wintering. For this reason, I suspect many folks will connect the solar regulator to the battery side. Noting of course that the solar system should always incorporate breakers on the panel and battery side of the regulator.
All interesting issues to consider when briefing crew etc.
Dean