Topics

Toilet Pumps to bilge???


Duane Siegfri
 

On Wanderer, when we run one of the toilet pumps, enough of the seawater goes to the bilge to activate the bilge pump (of course the bilge had to be partially full for this to happen, or the seawater pump was run for a longer time).

The seawater lines to the toilets have a vent loop in the engine room that has a tube going into the bilge.  As far as I can see there isn't a mechanical vent there.  So the conclusion I come to is that the seawater lines are clogged.  I haven't heard about this on the forum here so I'm wondering: is this common?

Duane
Wanderer, SM#477


 

The seawater toilet pump anti-siphon lines can get blocked with salt. It will be very obvious with a buildup of salt at the top. And, of course these anti-siphon lines either drain (if not blocked) into the gray water, or overflow (if blocked into the gray water.

If the gray water level is close to triggering the pump-out of gray water, the amount of saltwater passing into the gray water tank from the anti-siphon system can be enough to trigger the pump switch.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970



On Wed, Jun 26, 2019 at 11:44 AM Duane Siegfri via Groups.Io <carlylelk=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
On Wanderer, when we run one of the toilet pumps, enough of the seawater goes to the bilge to activate the bilge pump (of course the bilge had to be partially full for this to happen, or the seawater pump was run for a longer time).

The seawater lines to the toilets have a vent loop in the engine room that has a tube going into the bilge.  As far as I can see there isn't a mechanical vent there.  So the conclusion I come to is that the seawater lines are clogged.  I haven't heard about this on the forum here so I'm wondering: is this common?

Duane
Wanderer, SM#477


Paul Osterberg
 

I have no vent on my sea water pump for the toilets. Nor for the anchor wash pump either. Should that be a problem?
Paul on SY Kerpa SM 259 Horta Azores 


 

The anchor wash pump does not need an anti-siphon vent. 

The anti-siphon vent was installed on the toilet "supply pump" lines in SMs that used "shared saltwater" via the saltwater manifold. The anti-siphon ensured that no water from the toilet would siphon back to the shared saltwater system. I suspect your SM toilet gets its saltwater from something other than the saltwater manifold.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970



On Wed, Jun 26, 2019 at 1:27 PM Paul Osterberg <osterberg.paul.l@...> wrote:
I have no vent on my sea water pump for the toilets. Nor for the anchor wash pump either. Should that be a problem?
Paul on SY Kerpa SM 259 Horta Azores 


Mark McGovern
 

Paul,

Not having an anti-siphon valve on the anchor wash pump shouldn't be an issue because the hose goes well above the water line so that even when heeled over saltwater should not be able to flow through the hose. And even if it did, it would just be pumped overboard out the front of the boat!

However, there definitely should be anti-siphon valves in each of the toilet water feed lines.  The Amel manual even states that they are there in the section on Toilets. My understanding is that this is because the hoses that run to the toilets are either right at or right below the waterline and they are certainly BELOW the waterline when you are on a starboard tack.  Given that, seawater from the intake could flow into the toilets if there is not at least a loop of line that goes ABOVE the waterline preventing water from flowing from the manifold into the toilet.  Amel uses a full anti-siphon valve and not just a high loop.  See this article for a primer on anti-siphon valves:  https://www.boatus.com/magazine/2018/april/anti-siphon-valves.asp

--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD USA


karkauai
 

On SM243 the fill pumps for the heads draw water from separate thru-hulls in the “hallways” just inboard of the heads, near the center of the boat.  There are no vent loops for either head.

Kent & Iris
Kristy SM243

On Jun 26, 2019, at 4:22 PM, Mark McGovern <mfmcgovern@...> wrote:

Paul,

Not having an anti-siphon valve on the anchor wash pump shouldn't be an issue because the hose goes well above the water line so that even when heeled over saltwater should not be able to flow through the hose. And even if it did, it would just be pumped overboard out the front of the boat!

However, there definitely should be anti-siphon valves in each of the toilet water feed lines.  The Amel manual even states that they are there in the section on Toilets. My understanding is that this is because the hoses that run to the toilets are either right at or right below the waterline and they are certainly BELOW the waterline when you are on a starboard tack.  Given that, seawater from the intake could flow into the toilets if there is not at least a loop of line that goes ABOVE the waterline preventing water from flowing from the manifold into the toilet.  Amel uses a full anti-siphon valve and not just a high loop.  See this article for a primer on anti-siphon valves:  https://www.boatus.com/magazine/2018/april/anti-siphon-valves.asp

--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD USA


Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi duane. Me too

Danny

Sm 299

Ocean pearl

On 27 June 2019 at 04:44 "Duane Siegfri via Groups.Io" <carlylelk@...> wrote:

On Wanderer, when we run one of the toilet pumps, enough of the seawater goes to the bilge to activate the bilge pump (of course the bilge had to be partially full for this to happen, or the seawater pump was run for a longer time).

The seawater lines to the toilets have a vent loop in the engine room that has a tube going into the bilge.  As far as I can see there isn't a mechanical vent there.  So the conclusion I come to is that the seawater lines are clogged.  I haven't heard about this on the forum here so I'm wondering: is this common?

Duane
Wanderer, SM#477


Paul Osterberg
 

Thank you Marc
Should the antisifone be on the suction side or pressure side, or does it not matter? 
Paul on SY Kerpa SM 259 


Duane Siegfri
 

Bill,

Would a product like Salt-Away dissolve the salt build-up, or would vinegar be sufficient?

Thanks,
Duane


 

Since that saltwater is not shared no anti-siphon needed. 

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Yacht School - Supporting Amel Owners
www.YachtSchool.us
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970

On Wed, Jun 26, 2019, 4:29 PM karkauai via Groups.Io <karkauai=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
On SM243 the fill pumps for the heads draw water from separate thru-hulls in the “hallways” just inboard of the heads, near the center of the boat.  There are no vent loops for either head.

Kent & Iris
Kristy SM243

On Jun 26, 2019, at 4:22 PM, Mark McGovern <mfmcgovern@...> wrote:

Paul,

Not having an anti-siphon valve on the anchor wash pump shouldn't be an issue because the hose goes well above the water line so that even when heeled over saltwater should not be able to flow through the hose. And even if it did, it would just be pumped overboard out the front of the boat!

However, there definitely should be anti-siphon valves in each of the toilet water feed lines.  The Amel manual even states that they are there in the section on Toilets. My understanding is that this is because the hoses that run to the toilets are either right at or right below the waterline and they are certainly BELOW the waterline when you are on a starboard tack.  Given that, seawater from the intake could flow into the toilets if there is not at least a loop of line that goes ABOVE the waterline preventing water from flowing from the manifold into the toilet.  Amel uses a full anti-siphon valve and not just a high loop.  See this article for a primer on anti-siphon valves:  https://www.boatus.com/magazine/2018/april/anti-siphon-valves.asp

--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD USA