Topics

Maintenance costs for Amel yachts


Orion Martin
 

Hello everyone, I am new to the site and thank you to the moderators for letting me join this group.

I am currently toying with the idea of purchasing an Amel Super Maramu or Santorin within the next two years. Longing to embark on a circumnavigation, I have researched various bluewater vessels looking at characteristics such as comfort, safety etc. Having come across Sailing SV Delos on Youtube, this was the first time I had ever seen an Amel yacht. At first I thought the Amel Super Maramu was rather quirky, particularly the interior. However, after much research and looking at video, photos etc, I am now utterly enthralled with Amel yachts and think it is the perfect brand to travel the world with.

There is one thing that I noticed from the Delos videos, and subsequently online postings and literature pertaining to the upkeep of Amel yachts is the amount of maintenance and the subsequently high cost of such maintenance. I have minimal experience with yachts from a technical point of view, however I was curious to know whether current Amel yacht owners consider their boats to be more maintenance intensive and costly especially compared with other previous yachts they may have owned. Granted, the Amel has a lot more gadgetry (is that the right word?) than what I have seen compared with a Moody or Oyster. Does the preventative maintenance regime required to keep Amel yachts in good shape mitigate costs as much as it would say with a comparable boat? Or is it by its very nature that the satisfaction of owning an Amel comes at a cost compared with similar blue water vessels?

I love the Amel Super Maramu and the Amel 54, and I have been caught in the cult of Amel as they say. But I was curious as to what current Amel owners think about their relationship with their vessels regarding costs and downtime. I figure that owning a Super Maramu would bring me a lot of joy, but also a lot of headaches in particular if I am to do a circumnavigation. Any opinions and comments regarding this subject warmly welcomed.


Ian Park
 

Hi and welcome to the group.

Yes, reading the posts gives the impression that AMELs are a constant maintenance boat.
Not true. It is just the helpful nature of this particular group that folk feel they always get instant first class help if a problem occurs or a maintenance job comes up they haven’t attempted themselves before.
Others will give you the same advice, when choosing an Amel get someone who really knows the boat to survey it. (I didn’t but have been lucky).
Yes, the boat is very different to other boats so owners do ask a lot of questions.
I looked at an Oyster 435 before got my Santorin. I’ve got much the better boat.
You will spend at least two years really getting to know the systems, but then a good annual maintenance schedule will give you the ultimate short handed ocean cruiser around (personal opinion after 5 years ownership).

Best of luck with your plans


Mark Erdos
 

Orion,

 

I think you will find the cost and maintenance on Amel boats to be considerably less than others, especially those you mention, Moody and Oyster. When reading this forum, a person needs to keep in mind there are over 1,000 participants and for the most part very few serious complaints about our vessels. All boats will break. The question you should ask yourself is how easy it is to fix. A stand up engine room with access to all sides of both the engine and genset, access to all electronics and steering components, a bow-thruster than can be service while the vessel in the water, a sea-chest to minimize through-hulls and watertight compartments are some of the features that make Amel such attractive boats for serious world cruisers. In addition, the support we receive from Amel for parts is second to none. They are a first-class operation.

 

Perhaps you should research further. For example, take a look at the Pacific Puddle Jump recaps. http://www.pacificpuddlejump.com/articles.html They list all the boats and the things that broke during the ocean crossing. An example of an Oyster: failures of Autohelm; seacock; spin pole track; waterpump; mainsail clew shackle failed. Three of these are pretty serious.

 

High cost of maintenance is a given for ALL boats. They are expensive high maintenance divas. Bill Rouse posted an entire budget for a 10 year circumnavigation on his Amel documenting every penny spent. I challenge you to find any other brand of vessel on a 10-year voyage that was meticulously maintained for an average of $9,000 per year. http://svbebe.blogspot.com/p/costs.html

 

I really do not understand how you are coming to the conclusion Amel boats have higher cost of maintenance and downtime.

 

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Vista Mar, Panama

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Orion Martin
Sent: Wednesday, August 21, 2019 11:45 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Maintenance costs for Amel yachts

 

Hello everyone, I am new to the site and thank you to the moderators for letting me join this group.

I am currently toying with the idea of purchasing an Amel Super Maramu or Santorin within the next two years. Longing to embark on a circumnavigation, I have researched various bluewater vessels looking at characteristics such as comfort, safety etc. Having come across Sailing SV Delos on Youtube, this was the first time I had ever seen an Amel yacht. At first I thought the Amel Super Maramu was rather quirky, particularly the interior. However, after much research and looking at video, photos etc, I am now utterly enthralled with Amel yachts and think it is the perfect brand to travel the world with.

There is one thing that I noticed from the Delos videos, and subsequently online postings and literature pertaining to the upkeep of Amel yachts is the amount of maintenance and the subsequently high cost of such maintenance. I have minimal experience with yachts from a technical point of view, however I was curious to know whether current Amel yacht owners consider their boats to be more maintenance intensive and costly especially compared with other previous yachts they may have owned. Granted, the Amel has a lot more gadgetry (is that the right word?) than what I have seen compared with a Moody or Oyster. Does the preventative maintenance regime required to keep Amel yachts in good shape mitigate costs as much as it would say with a comparable boat? Or is it by its very nature that the satisfaction of owning an Amel comes at a cost compared with similar blue water vessels?

I love the Amel Super Maramu and the Amel 54, and I have been caught in the cult of Amel as they say. But I was curious as to what current Amel owners think about their relationship with their vessels regarding costs and downtime. I figure that owning a Super Maramu would bring me a lot of joy, but also a lot of headaches in particular if I am to do a circumnavigation. Any opinions and comments regarding this subject warmly welcomed.


Elja Röllinghoff Balu SM 222
 

The first and best step to buy an amel is not to save the cost for an appraiser who is really familiar with Amel 

( atlantic Yachtservey oliver Beteue Group Member) 

You will learn more about an Amel in 2 days than you find out in 5 years alone. 

Maintenance is not more expensive ( SM ) than with other ships of this size, and Amel still has the important parts for the SM in stock. 

In addition, this group helps to find bugs quickly and gives advice to repair them. 

we have our SM BJ 1998 now 5 years and had no special problems. 

Let's get a pump for the climate situation times the AP but these are things that happen to you on every ship at the age of 20 


Greetings SM Balu s. 222


Von meinem iPhone gesendet


Paul Brown
 

Hello, I am an owner of an Amel 55 2013 for the last 16 months and previously for the last 16 years owned 4 other larger boats. All boats can be expensive to maintain and have a basic maintenance requirement. Amel from my experience is an extremely well founded and produced boat, better than most and certainly one of the best all time blue water cruisers. If you were to buy, in my opinion a well maintained, free of issues and well loved Amel SM 54 or 55 you would enjoy its performance and simply need to keep her loved and well maintained. Use an excellent surveyor that knows Amel as a specialty 

Best regards, Paul - Fortuna II 55#17


On 22 Aug 2019, at 5:45 am, Orion Martin <poonz1@...> wrote:

Hello everyone, I am new to the site and thank you to the moderators for letting me join this group.

I am currently toying with the idea of purchasing an Amel Super Maramu or Santorin within the next two years. Longing to embark on a circumnavigation, I have researched various bluewater vessels looking at characteristics such as comfort, safety etc. Having come across Sailing SV Delos on Youtube, this was the first time I had ever seen an Amel yacht. At first I thought the Amel Super Maramu was rather quirky, particularly the interior. However, after much research and looking at video, photos etc, I am now utterly enthralled with Amel yachts and think it is the perfect brand to travel the world with.

There is one thing that I noticed from the Delos videos, and subsequently online postings and literature pertaining to the upkeep of Amel yachts is the amount of maintenance and the subsequently high cost of such maintenance. I have minimal experience with yachts from a technical point of view, however I was curious to know whether current Amel yacht owners consider their boats to be more maintenance intensive and costly especially compared with other previous yachts they may have owned. Granted, the Amel has a lot more gadgetry (is that the right word?) than what I have seen compared with a Moody or Oyster. Does the preventative maintenance regime required to keep Amel yachts in good shape mitigate costs as much as it would say with a comparable boat? Or is it by its very nature that the satisfaction of owning an Amel comes at a cost compared with similar blue water vessels?

I love the Amel Super Maramu and the Amel 54, and I have been caught in the cult of Amel as they say. But I was curious as to what current Amel owners think about their relationship with their vessels regarding costs and downtime. I figure that owning a Super Maramu would bring me a lot of joy, but also a lot of headaches in particular if I am to do a circumnavigation. Any opinions and comments regarding this subject warmly welcomed.


John Clark
 

Hello Orion,
    Welcome to the group.   To go straight to your question;  no,  Amels are not more expensive than other yachts in a similar class. (I can speak authoritatively for Super Maramus and Santorins)    Yes they are quirky....but in a functional way that you will appreciate.  My experience with my SM, Annie, a 1990 model has been entirely positive.  Yes some stuff breaks, but I don't think I have spent any real money on "broken" items.  I did update the electronics, add a second autopilot and solar arch. Those cost a bit, but I consider them wants not needs.   My insurance wanted the standing rig updated so I had it replaced after I purchased the vessel, cost would be the same for any vessel in the same class. 
  I probably could have done none of the above and still had a near perfect sailing yacht.    My equipment failure list in the last three years and 13000 NM sailing is a bilge pump(Amel rebuild kit $100) SW impeller on main engine...failed and melted the muffler(most SMs have a SS muffler I had plastic) repair cost $34 + $300, genoa sail seam split at top of sail 2x, cost about $150 to repair each time, mainsail furler gears ($23 for gears $70 for machine shop to get the old gear out.), frig compressor, replaced with off the shelf bolt in upgrade($800).   Generator SW impeller ($34)  My boat came with set of spare sails so no down time. Most recently the genoa sheet car failed. Replacement cost is between $125(Ebay) and $450(Antal) for a replacement.  Not too bad for three years and near constant sailing. 

My Amel Journey:
I planned for my "big boat" purchase for several years before committing.   I remember I had read about Amels at one point.  The author thought they were innovative, but too complicated to be practical...so I didn't pursue them further.  But I know now that God and Henri have mysterious ways.  Years later on one particular afternoon I took a friend to the hospital for an outpatient procedure.  I had a couple of hours to kill while waiting and went for a walk at the local marina.  There I saw a strikingly beautiful boat. ...you know the saying  "one look is all it took."  I looked up the boat, she was an Amel 64...priced in the "double digits" at the time...you know price is 1.5M .  No I could not afford that Amel, but it completely rearranged my view of the brand  stuck in my head. 

A year or two later I was zeroing in on buying an Irwin 68 when just like you I too discovered SV Delos on YouTube.  Looking at Delos I thought wow that is one cool boat....didn't pick up on it being an Amel for a little while.  I think it was some episode where Brian was recounting discovering Delos where I realized what Delos was..  Like me he said he was hooked at the first glance.  I started researching the brand with more diligence and became really impressed.   Just like you, I joined the Amel Owners Forum as it was called at the time, and was referred to a fellow named Joel Potter. He was the Amel dealer/broker for North America.  I called him and we talked for over two hours.  He did not have an Amel that met my price point but still gave me hours of advice and pointers on what to look for.  He even gave me inside info on Amel's I was interested in...he is a resource and a really good guy to talk to.  

The first Amel I saw in the flesh was in Virginia.  I had already arranged to look at an SM in Portugal but my GF at the time thought I was crazy to think about flying to the EU and buying a boat I had never seen.  We found a boat for sale in VA that was priced too high for me but was in brokerage and available to visit. We took a weekend and drove up to look at it.  Needless to say the GF was blown away...me I was just saying yes...this is what I want. The boat was in OK condition but had a few issues.  It wasn't the right one for me BUT it confirmed everything I thought I knew about Amels.  That weekend we looked at Passports, Island Packets, Freedoms, a Manson, a Cabo, a couple of Hans Christians, and....yes a Beneteau.   Nothing compared to that Amel. The very nice broker who gave us the boat show saw our feelings and admitted to us...once you see the Amel you are done.  
So my advice:   Like you, I somewhat superficially fixated on the Delos model, the SM2K.  They were made from 1999 to 2005.  Amel started making Super Maramus in 1989.   I would not restrict myself to considering just the later years.  I got a good deal on Annie...the previous owner's offered price made me take a look at her even though she was an older SM, and at the time not in my window of consideration.  She was perfect.  Now after a few years and hanging out with other SM owners most with newer models, I am actually happy that I bought Annie and not a newer SM.  She retains more of the expedition yacht features than the later SMs and in my opinion has more character inside....wood floors, ceiling trim boards, older more robust furling mechanisms...and some cool sailing history.  

That is another thing you get with an Amel.  You are the custodian/care taker of the boat as much as you are the owner.  I still maintain correspondence with the previous owners who sailed Annie for 16 years...and they maintain contact with the original owner.  I email them from time to time with pictures of the boat and us frolicking.    When I sail into Le Marin and talk to Alban at the Amel service center, he knows the boat and maintains a record of  the entire history of the vessel.  Every time I come back he asks me what I have done with the boat since we last met.  Remember now this is a 30 year old vessel ...and he still maintains a file on her.  The Amel community is very engaging and attentive.

Well my email is getting too long.  In closing , yes you are making an excellent choice to consider Amel.  The SM was made without significant changes for 16 years.  It is a proven design and to date none have ever been lost at sea.   Also, by now probably most have circumnavigated.  Find that in any other brand.    There are a ton of resources and people to support you should you buy an Amel.  In addition to Joel Potter, I suggest you speak to Bill Rouse who runs this Group and also an Amel yacht centric consulting business.  He is an invaluable resource now and when you are ready to purchase.  

      Regards,  John Clark
SV Annie  SM 37
Brunswick GA




On Thu, Aug 22, 2019 at 8:43 AM Orion Martin <poonz1@...> wrote:
Hello everyone, I am new to the site and thank you to the moderators for letting me join this group.

I am currently toying with the idea of purchasing an Amel Super Maramu or Santorin within the next two years. Longing to embark on a circumnavigation, I have researched various bluewater vessels looking at characteristics such as comfort, safety etc. Having come across Sailing SV Delos on Youtube, this was the first time I had ever seen an Amel yacht. At first I thought the Amel Super Maramu was rather quirky, particularly the interior. However, after much research and looking at video, photos etc, I am now utterly enthralled with Amel yachts and think it is the perfect brand to travel the world with.

There is one thing that I noticed from the Delos videos, and subsequently online postings and literature pertaining to the upkeep of Amel yachts is the amount of maintenance and the subsequently high cost of such maintenance. I have minimal experience with yachts from a technical point of view, however I was curious to know whether current Amel yacht owners consider their boats to be more maintenance intensive and costly especially compared with other previous yachts they may have owned. Granted, the Amel has a lot more gadgetry (is that the right word?) than what I have seen compared with a Moody or Oyster. Does the preventative maintenance regime required to keep Amel yachts in good shape mitigate costs as much as it would say with a comparable boat? Or is it by its very nature that the satisfaction of owning an Amel comes at a cost compared with similar blue water vessels?

I love the Amel Super Maramu and the Amel 54, and I have been caught in the cult of Amel as they say. But I was curious as to what current Amel owners think about their relationship with their vessels regarding costs and downtime. I figure that owning a Super Maramu would bring me a lot of joy, but also a lot of headaches in particular if I am to do a circumnavigation. Any opinions and comments regarding this subject warmly welcomed.


John Clark
 

I concur. 


On Thu, Aug 22, 2019 at 9:34 AM Elja Röllinghoff Balu SM 222 <Bijorka@...> wrote:

The first and best step to buy an amel is not to save the cost for an appraiser who is really familiar with Amel 

( atlantic Yachtservey oliver Beteue Group Member) 

You will learn more about an Amel in 2 days than you find out in 5 years alone. 

Maintenance is not more expensive ( SM ) than with other ships of this size, and Amel still has the important parts for the SM in stock. 

In addition, this group helps to find bugs quickly and gives advice to repair them. 

we have our SM BJ 1998 now 5 years and had no special problems. 

Let's get a pump for the climate situation times the AP but these are things that happen to you on every ship at the age of 20 


Greetings SM Balu s. 222


Von meinem iPhone gesendet


Courtney Gorman
 

Hi John are you staying at Brunswick landing Marina l miss the free beer!  Cheers
Courtney
Trippin
54 #101
Grenada


-----Original Message-----
From: John Clark <john.biohead@...>
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io Group Moderators <main@amelyachtowners.groups.io>
Sent: Thu, Aug 22, 2019 10:45 am
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Maintenance costs for Amel yachts

Hello Orion,
    Welcome to the group.   To go straight to your question;  no,  Amels are not more expensive than other yachts in a similar class. (I can speak authoritatively for Super Maramus and Santorins)    Yes they are quirky....but in a functional way that you will appreciate.  My experience with my SM, Annie, a 1990 model has been entirely positive.  Yes some stuff breaks, but I don't think I have spent any real money on "broken" items.  I did update the electronics, add a second autopilot and solar arch. Those cost a bit, but I consider them wants not needs.   My insurance wanted the standing rig updated so I had it replaced after I purchased the vessel, cost would be the same for any vessel in the same class. 
  I probably could have done none of the above and still had a near perfect sailing yacht.    My equipment failure list in the last three years and 13000 NM sailing is a bilge pump(Amel rebuild kit $100) SW impeller on main engine...failed and melted the muffler(most SMs have a SS muffler I had plastic) repair cost $34 + $300, genoa sail seam split at top of sail 2x, cost about $150 to repair each time, mainsail furler gears ($23 for gears $70 for machine shop to get the old gear out.), frig compressor, replaced with off the shelf bolt in upgrade($800).   Generator SW impeller ($34)  My boat came with set of spare sails so no down time. Most recently the genoa sheet car failed. Replacement cost is between $125(Ebay) and $450(Antal) for a replacement.  Not too bad for three years and near constant sailing. 

My Amel Journey:
I planned for my "big boat" purchase for several years before committing.   I remember I had read about Amels at one point.  The author thought they were innovative, but too complicated to be practical...so I didn't pursue them further.  But I know now that God and Henri have mysterious ways.  Years later on one particular afternoon I took a friend to the hospital for an outpatient procedure.  I had a couple of hours to kill while waiting and went for a walk at the local marina.  There I saw a strikingly beautiful boat. ...you know the saying  "one look is all it took."  I looked up the boat, she was an Amel 64...priced in the "double digits" at the time...you know price is 1.5M .  No I could not afford that Amel, but it completely rearranged my view of the brand  stuck in my head. 

A year or two later I was zeroing in on buying an Irwin 68 when just like you I too discovered SV Delos on YouTube.  Looking at Delos I thought wow that is one cool boat....didn't pick up on it being an Amel for a little while.  I think it was some episode where Brian was recounting discovering Delos where I realized what Delos was..  Like me he said he was hooked at the first glance.  I started researching the brand with more diligence and became really impressed.   Just like you, I joined the Amel Owners Forum as it was called at the time, and was referred to a fellow named Joel Potter. He was the Amel dealer/broker for North America.  I called him and we talked for over two hours.  He did not have an Amel that met my price point but still gave me hours of advice and pointers on what to look for.  He even gave me inside info on Amel's I was interested in...he is a resource and a really good guy to talk to.  

The first Amel I saw in the flesh was in Virginia.  I had already arranged to look at an SM in Portugal but my GF at the time thought I was crazy to think about flying to the EU and buying a boat I had never seen.  We found a boat for sale in VA that was priced too high for me but was in brokerage and available to visit. We took a weekend and drove up to look at it.  Needless to say the GF was blown away...me I was just saying yes...this is what I want. The boat was in OK condition but had a few issues.  It wasn't the right one for me BUT it confirmed everything I thought I knew about Amels.  That weekend we looked at Passports, Island Packets, Freedoms, a Manson, a Cabo, a couple of Hans Christians, and....yes a Beneteau.   Nothing compared to that Amel. The very nice broker who gave us the boat show saw our feelings and admitted to us...once you see the Amel you are done.  
So my advice:   Like you, I somewhat superficially fixated on the Delos model, the SM2K.  They were made from 1999 to 2005.  Amel started making Super Maramus in 1989.   I would not restrict myself to considering just the later years.  I got a good deal on Annie...the previous owner's offered price made me take a look at her even though she was an older SM, and at the time not in my window of consideration.  She was perfect.  Now after a few years and hanging out with other SM owners most with newer models, I am actually happy that I bought Annie and not a newer SM.  She retains more of the expedition yacht features than the later SMs and in my opinion has more character inside....wood floors, ceiling trim boards, older more robust furling mechanisms...and some cool sailing history.  

That is another thing you get with an Amel.  You are the custodian/care taker of the boat as much as you are the owner.  I still maintain correspondence with the previous owners who sailed Annie for 16 years...and they maintain contact with the original owner.  I email them from time to time with pictures of the boat and us frolicking.    When I sail into Le Marin and talk to Alban at the Amel service center, he knows the boat and maintains a record of  the entire history of the vessel.  Every time I come back he asks me what I have done with the boat since we last met.  Remember now this is a 30 year old vessel ...and he still maintains a file on her.  The Amel community is very engaging and attentive.

Well my email is getting too long.  In closing , yes you are making an excellent choice to consider Amel.  The SM was made without significant changes for 16 years.  It is a proven design and to date none have ever been lost at sea.   Also, by now probably most have circumnavigated.  Find that in any other brand.    There are a ton of resources and people to support you should you buy an Amel.  In addition to Joel Potter, I suggest you speak to Bill Rouse who runs this Group and also an Amel yacht centric consulting business.  He is an invaluable resource now and when you are ready to purchase.  

      Regards,  John Clark
SV Annie  SM 37
Brunswick GA




On Thu, Aug 22, 2019 at 8:43 AM Orion Martin <poonz1@...> wrote:
Hello everyone, I am new to the site and thank you to the moderators for letting me join this group.

I am currently toying with the idea of purchasing an Amel Super Maramu or Santorin within the next two years. Longing to embark on a circumnavigation, I have researched various bluewater vessels looking at characteristics such as comfort, safety etc. Having come across Sailing SV Delos on Youtube, this was the first time I had ever seen an Amel yacht. At first I thought the Amel Super Maramu was rather quirky, particularly the interior. However, after much research and looking at video, photos etc, I am now utterly enthralled with Amel yachts and think it is the perfect brand to travel the world with.

There is one thing that I noticed from the Delos videos, and subsequently online postings and literature pertaining to the upkeep of Amel yachts is the amount of maintenance and the subsequently high cost of such maintenance. I have minimal experience with yachts from a technical point of view, however I was curious to know whether current Amel yacht owners consider their boats to be more maintenance intensive and costly especially compared with other previous yachts they may have owned. Granted, the Amel has a lot more gadgetry (is that the right word?) than what I have seen compared with a Moody or Oyster. Does the preventative maintenance regime required to keep Amel yachts in good shape mitigate costs as much as it would say with a comparable boat? Or is it by its very nature that the satisfaction of owning an Amel comes at a cost compared with similar blue water vessels?

I love the Amel Super Maramu and the Amel 54, and I have been caught in the cult of Amel as they say. But I was curious as to what current Amel owners think about their relationship with their vessels regarding costs and downtime. I figure that owning a Super Maramu would bring me a lot of joy, but also a lot of headaches in particular if I am to do a circumnavigation. Any opinions and comments regarding this subject warmly welcomed.


 

Orion,

I have 10 years of total expenses posted on our circumnavigation blog at www.svbebe.com. Click on the COSTS tab.
--
 
Best,
 
Bill Rouse
Yacht School  
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970


Thomas Kleman
 

Orion- I'd second these comments but also point out that your maintenance costs depend largely on picking a good Amel and how quickly you climb the learning curve where you can do most of the work yourself....as with any boat.

First, finding a good Amel....shame on you if you fumble this aspect. Between Joel, Olivier, Bill, and some others you have ample resources to locate and evaluate a boat. Use them.

Regarding the learning curve, most of us on this site are not naval architects or engineers by trade. We use the Amel community and resources to solicit advice and resolve problems. One could infer by reading the site that Amels are high maintenance boats but you're looking at the oasis inferring all animals are thirsty. We use the site when the rare issue arises where input would be helpful.

So in my opinion your question has no definitive answer but only a more subjective one. You've probably noticed Amel owners love their boats in a way I haven't noticed among other marques and yes, in buying one you are joining a community (or cult depending your outlook).

Tom and Kirstin
SM2K 422 SV L'ORIENT
Colon, Panama


Orion Martin
 

Hi John,

Thank you and to the other participants in this topic for your time and insights. Your post with the story about how you came to know Amel yachts was a great read, this was exactly the kind of anecdote I was looking for that describes the discovery and eventual fondness for the SM of which I am currently experiencing. I agree with Mark Erdos that I have made an ill-informed assumption about maintenance costs for Amel yachts, hence why it was important to reach out to fellow Amel enthusiasts and ask them about their thoughts concerning this subject. As a consequence, I feel more excited about the prospect of purchasing a SM in the near future, and will take the good advice concerning having an experienced Amel surveyor check the boat when it comes time to purchase. Many thank to all once again.


ngtnewington Newington
 

My penny’s worth.
Amelia is my third sailboat but I also worked as a professional yacht captain for nearly 20 years on numerous vessels. 

I have to say that, in general, my Amel 54 is the best engineered of any boat that I have run or owned.
And therefore not excessively expensive to run.

As with all boats there are some compromises I do not like but they are minor.
It is fair to say that the more modern Amels have quite a lot of systems that need looking after and there are a lot of electric motors etc etc. The thing is, compared to just about any other sail boat the access is great. Generally the systems have been installed with a view that at some point they will need to be either serviced or replaced.

What you need to do is:
1. Learn to fix everything yourself
2. Make sure you have a really good tool kit
3. Learn to love fixing things, and learn to love and enjoy the whole engineering aspect of owning an Amel.

This group is a great resource and as a novice you can not do much better than get Bill onside to help you.

One more piece of advice. When you first buy your Amel do not just start chucking money at it (unless of course you buy a project) just get to know your boat and climb the learning curve....

Good luck
Nick
Amelia anchored Ionian
AML54-019

On 23 Aug 2019, at 06:09, Orion Martin <poonz1@...> wrote:

Hi John,

Thank you and to the other participants in this topic for your time and insights. Your post with the story about how you came to know Amel yachts was a great read, this was exactly the kind of anecdote I was looking for that describes the discovery and eventual fondness for the SM of which I am currently experiencing. I agree with Mark Erdos that I have made an ill-informed assumption about maintenance costs for Amel yachts, hence why it was important to reach out to fellow Amel enthusiasts and ask them about their thoughts concerning this subject. As a consequence, I feel more excited about the prospect of purchasing a SM in the near future, and will take the good advice concerning having an experienced Amel surveyor check the boat when it comes time to purchase. Many thank to all once again.


Colin - ex SV Island Pearl
 

We on Island Pearl II agree with every comment above.

Island Pearl II is our 7th cruising yacht over the past 15 years of sailing, and the best by far!. We have had some really nice (and far newer) boats before purchasing this 2001 model Amel Super Maramu 2000, but this boat, for a world circumnavigation, is far better than everything else you could ever imagine out there! Trust us on this one, as we are still out there now, (currently in Tonga, depart for Fiji on Sunday  - see live tracker below)  along with many other very nice expensive brands, however we would not trade our 2001 Amel for any of them, as we have had ABSOLUTELY ZERO issues, and I cannot think of a single boat that has sailed with us all the way around the world now, which has not had multiple major issues to date, especially when we all hit the Indian Ocean!

We complete our circumnavigation on her in  Brisbane, Australia on 1 November 2019, and will then sell to pursue other on-land interests for the next five years, (will be a very sad day for me in particular after 8 years in this wonderful Amel community!)  but can tell you that these boats are robust, almost over-engineered, and because of the incredible quality and robust engineering foresight that has gone into these boats, you can have extreme confidence in the total Amel System. 

Simply find a good well kept Amel, take advice from this group (including experts like Bill Rouse and Oliver) who you can reach via this site,  then learn to do all your maintenance yourself (learn from others on this site - never trust anyone to do anything on your boat without you personally there and looking over their shoulders and every detail if you need expert help!, and make sure you service everything meticulously (eg we service both genset and Yanmar 75HP every 80 - 120hrs when the manual calls for 200hrs). Ensure you put good fuel in at all times (we triple filter every drop of fuel, and have a good fuel polisher built in too), and do your mast, rig, sails, and all inspections meticulously before every ocean crossing. If you do this I can assure you your Amel will look after you instead of visa Versa! We have has 50+knots and 6m swells in whiteout conditions in the mid-Indian Ocean, and all felt totally safe out there where others did not, and some did not make it. The Amel 53 gave us total confidence and simply dealt with it all easily in her stride.

Best of luck, you have come across the safest sailing vessels out there in the ocean, and they sail really well too.

Colin Streeter
Tonga today, Fiji next week.



On Fri, Aug 23, 2019 at 5:40 PM ngtnewington Newington via Groups.Io <ngtnewington=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
My penny’s worth.
Amelia is my third sailboat but I also worked as a professional yacht captain for nearly 20 years on numerous vessels. 

I have to say that, in general, my Amel 54 is the best engineered of any boat that I have run or owned.
And therefore not excessively expensive to run.

As with all boats there are some compromises I do not like but they are minor.
It is fair to say that the more modern Amels have quite a lot of systems that need looking after and there are a lot of electric motors etc etc. The thing is, compared to just about any other sail boat the access is great. Generally the systems have been installed with a view that at some point they will need to be either serviced or replaced.

What you need to do is:
1. Learn to fix everything yourself
2. Make sure you have a really good tool kit
3. Learn to love fixing things, and learn to love and enjoy the whole engineering aspect of owning an Amel.

This group is a great resource and as a novice you can not do much better than get Bill onside to help you.

One more piece of advice. When you first buy your Amel do not just start chucking money at it (unless of course you buy a project) just get to know your boat and climb the learning curve....

Good luck
Nick
Amelia anchored Ionian
AML54-019

On 23 Aug 2019, at 06:09, Orion Martin <poonz1@...> wrote:

Hi John,

Thank you and to the other participants in this topic for your time and insights. Your post with the story about how you came to know Amel yachts was a great read, this was exactly the kind of anecdote I was looking for that describes the discovery and eventual fondness for the SM of which I am currently experiencing. I agree with Mark Erdos that I have made an ill-informed assumption about maintenance costs for Amel yachts, hence why it was important to reach out to fellow Amel enthusiasts and ask them about their thoughts concerning this subject. As a consequence, I feel more excited about the prospect of purchasing a SM in the near future, and will take the good advice concerning having an experienced Amel surveyor check the boat when it comes time to purchase. Many thank to all once again.



--
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445


Paul Dowd and Sharon Brown
 

Bill,

 

Can I email you privately to arrange to meet up sometime? You can get me on paul <dot> dowd <a>t fgps <dot> com

 

Cheers,

Paul

S/Y Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of CW Bill Rouse
Sent: 22 August 2019 17:43
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Maintenance costs for Amel yachts

 

Orion,

I have 10 years of total expenses posted on our circumnavigation blog at www.svbebe.com. Click on the COSTS tab.
--

 

Best,

 

Bill Rouse
Yacht School  
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970


--
Cheers
Paul
Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98


andrew aupuni <dan.murphy3076@...>
 

Thank you for this Bill, this will be very helpful to me in the near future.

Kind regards 

On 23 Aug 2019, at 1:43 am, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:

Orion,

I have 10 years of total expenses posted on our circumnavigation blog at www.svbebe.com. Click on the COSTS tab.
--
 
Best,
 
Bill Rouse
Yacht School  
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970


Paul Brown
 

Hi Bill, that’s a great account and very much appreciate your sharing.

Could I please inquire, I thought Atlantic, Caribbean and pacific insurance policy’s were much higher? I’ve been quoted $13k+us for cruising in these area.

Kind regards Paul 


On 23 Aug 2019, at 2:40 pm, andrew aupuni <dan.murphy3076@...> wrote:

Thank you for this Bill, this will be very helpful to me in the near future.

Kind regards 

On 23 Aug 2019, at 1:43 am, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:

Orion,

I have 10 years of total expenses posted on our circumnavigation blog at www.svbebe.com. Click on the COSTS tab.
--
 
Best,
 
Bill Rouse
Yacht School  
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970


 

Paul 

In my experience, Europe waters insurance costs from EU companies are lower than most other areas by half or more.  

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Yacht School - Supporting Amel Owners
www.YachtSchool.us
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970


On Fri, Aug 23, 2019, 8:35 AM Paul Brown <feeder.brown@...> wrote:
Hi Bill, that’s a great account and very much appreciate your sharing.

Could I please inquire, I thought Atlantic, Caribbean and pacific insurance policy’s were much higher? I’ve been quoted $13k+us for cruising in these area.

Kind regards Paul 


On 23 Aug 2019, at 2:40 pm, andrew aupuni <dan.murphy3076@...> wrote:

Thank you for this Bill, this will be very helpful to me in the near future.

Kind regards 

On 23 Aug 2019, at 1:43 am, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:

Orion,

I have 10 years of total expenses posted on our circumnavigation blog at www.svbebe.com. Click on the COSTS tab.
--
 
Best,
 
Bill Rouse
Yacht School  
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970


Mark McGovern
 

Paul,

Keep in mind that Bill started his trip in 2006 and ended in 2016.  BEFORE Hurricane Irma and Maria.

--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD USA


Paul Brown
 

Thanks Mark 


On 23 Aug 2019, at 5:36 pm, Mark McGovern <mfmcgovern@...> wrote:

Paul,

Keep in mind that Bill started his trip in 2006 and ended in 2016.  BEFORE Hurricane Irma and Maria.

--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD USA


 

Yes,

You should note the year above each column then call "your choice of someone" in DC to convert my numbers to 2019 numbers. 

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Yacht School - Supporting Amel Owners
www.YachtSchool.us
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970


On Fri, Aug 23, 2019, 10:45 AM Paul Brown <feeder.brown@...> wrote:
Thanks Mark 


On 23 Aug 2019, at 5:36 pm, Mark McGovern <mfmcgovern@...> wrote:

Paul,

Keep in mind that Bill started his trip in 2006 and ended in 2016.  BEFORE Hurricane Irma and Maria.

--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD USA