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Lifting an engine using a beam on cockpit seats

 

Very Interesting thread on engine lift using a beam on cockpit seats. 

I saw a SM with delaminated fiberglass on the cockpit seat exactly where a beam you describe would rest on the seat. I never connected the seat delamination to an engine lift, which I believe occurred on that SM. NOW, I DO.

I doubt the seat is designed to take significant weight. I would CAUTION this practice. 

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Amel Yacht Owners School - www.YachtSchool.us
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970


On Thu, Aug 29, 2019, 4:57 AM christian alby via Groups.Io <calbyy=yahoo.fr@groups.io> wrote:
We did it already on our Maramu, lifting off & replacing engine afloat.
A stout piece of timber on top of engine, resting on cockpit side benches & main sheet did the trick once the engine was disconnected from its holding bolts fastenings to the support frame ...
This was the hard part 
- one nut on rear aft stb side gave poor access with the famous 1/8th of a turn with open wrench already grinded to enter space betwen batteries compartment & engine base; guess you can expect one of those
- engine base & mountings stuck by grease, & salt & whatever when trying to lift first, high resistance countered using crowbar & wooden block & wedges & sledgehammer (cautious when beating).
- removal of shaft was easy enough (4 bolts & nuts 10mm) then moved by hand; reverse to connect checking alignement respected when reinstating (clock markings on flange helped)
all makes an interesting day of work, & good Opportunity to clean Bottom & repair paint work. Satisfaction when completed - do not forget to check tightening of bolts on support frame after a while running - they come loose unless you Added loctite on threads.

Meanwhile fair winds & Following seas 

chrsitian alby - Désirade VIII - Maramu 116 - now in Canet Roussillon




Le jeudi 29 août 2019 à 05:28:30 UTC−4, smiles bernard via Groups.Io <smilesbernard=yahoo.com@groups.io> a écrit :


HI there
When we dis this on our Maramu we just put a i-Beam across the (padded) cockpit coaming and then used a lifting tackle off that 
It worked well and was very simple 
I presume the same would apply for the Mango but i'm not sure if you have the same lifting cockpit floor engine access?
All the best
M

Patrick McAneny
 

Bill, I agree and would not put that kind of weigh on the seats. I placed a 4x4 across the cockpit resting on the coaming next to the winches,I further spread the load with a 2x6 under it along with padding . I used a come along to provide lift and positioned it slightly aft of the lifting point on the engine ,so it was inclined to move aft away from the trans, moved the lifting point slightly forward  to move the engine forward to reinstall.
Pat
SM Shenanigans


-----Original Message-----
From: CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...>
To: main <main@amelyachtowners.groups.io>
Sent: Thu, Aug 29, 2019 9:04 am
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Lifting an engine using a beam on cockpit seats #IMPORTANT

Very Interesting thread on engine lift using a beam on cockpit seats. 

I saw a SM with delaminated fiberglass on the cockpit seat exactly where a beam you describe would rest on the seat. I never connected the seat delamination to an engine lift, which I believe occurred on that SM. NOW, I DO.

I doubt the seat is designed to take significant weight. I would CAUTION this practice. 

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Amel Yacht Owners School - www.YachtSchool.us
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970

On Thu, Aug 29, 2019, 4:57 AM christian alby via Groups.Io <calbyy=yahoo.fr@groups.io> wrote:
We did it already on our Maramu, lifting off & replacing engine afloat.
A stout piece of timber on top of engine, resting on cockpit side benches & main sheet did the trick once the engine was disconnected from its holding bolts fastenings to the support frame ...
This was the hard part 
- one nut on rear aft stb side gave poor access with the famous 1/8th of a turn with open wrench already grinded to enter space betwen batteries compartment & engine base; guess you can expect one of those
- engine base & mountings stuck by grease, & salt & whatever when trying to lift first, high resistance countered using crowbar & wooden block & wedges & sledgehammer (cautious when beating).
- removal of shaft was easy enough (4 bolts & nuts 10mm) then moved by hand; reverse to connect checking alignement respected when reinstating (clock markings on flange helped)
all makes an interesting day of work, & good Opportunity to clean Bottom & repair paint work. Satisfaction when completed - do not forget to check tightening of bolts on support frame after a while running - they come loose unless you Added loctite on threads.

Meanwhile fair winds & Following seas 

chrsitian alby - Désirade VIII - Maramu 116 - now in Canet Roussillon




Le jeudi 29 août 2019 à 05:28:30 UTC−4, smiles bernard via Groups.Io <smilesbernard=yahoo.com@groups.io> a écrit :


HI there
When we dis this on our Maramu we just put a i-Beam across the (padded) cockpit coaming and then used a lifting tackle off that 
It worked well and was very simple 
I presume the same would apply for the Mango but i'm not sure if you have the same lifting cockpit floor engine access?
All the best
M

Mark McGovern
 

I just replaced my engine mounts and the goddamn pain-in-the-ass bloody Vetus coupling a few weeks ago so I have some recent experience with this topic.  I considered using the cockpit coamings as the base for my lifting beam as they are flat and obviously strong.  However, it would have increased the span of the beam significantly so instead I used a 2 x 6 inch beam placed across the seats to lift the engine.  I did make crossmembers for each side of the beam to spread the load out a bit more across the seat.  Here are some pics of the beam and crossmembers:



The dry weight of a Yanmar 4JH3-HTE is only about 500lbs.  I removed both alternators, intercooler and exhaust elbow before lifting it so even with all the fluids added in, it likely weighed less than that so you are looking at maybe 250 lbs per side.  Spread that load over approximately 50 square inches and that is only 5psi of force so I was not too concerned.  The first time I lifted the engine completely I barely lifted it off the frame and looked and listened for any sign of cracking or deflecting and did not see any.  

I am certainly NOT saying that doing something like this can't cause problems but I can say that in my case with my setup and preparation of the engine (removing some of the weight), that it did not.  I still have the whole lifting setup on the boat so if anyone in the Chesapeake Bay area wants to borrow it in the next year or so, shoot me an email and you are welcome to.  I will need it back as I intend to re-align the engine after a 100 hours or so assuming that the mounts will settle a bit.

--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD USA

Paul Brown
 

G’day Mark, can I please ask how many hours had your motor done and what year launched? This is to give me an indication on what perhaps to expect

Kind regards Paul - Fortuna II 55#17


On 29 Aug 2019, at 6:35 pm, Mark McGovern <mfmcgovern@...> wrote:

I just replaced my engine mounts and the goddamn pain-in-the-ass bloody Vetus coupling a few weeks ago so I have some recent experience with this topic.  I considered using the cockpit coamings as the base for my lifting beam as they are flat and obviously strong.  However, it would have increased the span of the beam significantly so instead I used a 2 x 6 inch beam placed across the seats to lift the engine.  I did make crossmembers for each side of the beam to spread the load out a bit more across the seat.  Here are some pics of the beam and crossmembers:

<IMG_20190719_081959883.jpg><IMG_20190721_131727045_HDR.jpg><IMG_20190718_154057922 _1_.jpg><IMG_20190718_154108781.jpg>

The dry weight of a Yanmar 4JH3-HTE is only about 500lbs.  I removed both alternators, intercooler and exhaust elbow before lifting it so even with all the fluids added in, it likely weighed less than that so you are looking at maybe 250 lbs per side.  Spread that load over approximately 50 square inches and that is only 5psi of force so I was not too concerned.  The first time I lifted the engine completely I barely lifted it off the frame and looked and listened for any sign of cracking or deflecting and did not see any.  

I am certainly NOT saying that doing something like this can't cause problems but I can say that in my case with my setup and preparation of the engine (removing some of the weight), that it did not.  I still have the whole lifting setup on the boat so if anyone in the Chesapeake Bay area wants to borrow it in the next year or so, shoot me an email and you are welcome to.  I will need it back as I intend to re-align the engine after a 100 hours or so assuming that the mounts will settle a bit.

--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD USA

Dan
 

400 lb pound of the boom (Northern lights). 
That’s my dad in the back ground helping me out. 
image2.jpeg
image1.jpeg

smiles bernard
 

Likewise we did not use the seats but the coaming around the cockpit where winches are located 
All the best 
Miles 


On 29 Aug 2019, at 19:55, Dan <danny.rico@...> wrote:

400 lb pound of the boom (Northern lights). 
That’s my dad in the back ground helping me out. 
<image2.jpeg>
<image1.jpeg>

Alejandro Paquin
 

Hell Bill, I agree the seats are not suitable support for lifting the engine out of the engine compartment, BUT you can use the surface around the Lewmar winches in the cockpit to place a beam, if you put suitable wood supports and spead the weight over a larger area and secure the beam so it won´t move.
Reggards
--
Alex Paquin
S/V " SIMPATICO"
Amel Maramu
Hull #94, 1981

 

Alex,

I am sure that you are correct. I also expect that some seats will take the weight and others will not; and some people spread the weight out on the seats, and others do not.

The point I was trying to make was I saw a delaminated seat in exactly the spot where a beam would have rested. I couldn't figure out why it delaminated, now I am fairly certain why. 

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970



On Thu, Aug 29, 2019 at 4:30 PM Alejandro Paquin <alex.paquin@...> wrote:
Hell Bill, I agree the seats are not suitable support for lifting the engine out of the engine compartment, BUT you can use the surface around the Lewmar winches in the cockpit to place a beam, if you put suitable wood supports and spead the weight over a larger area and secure the beam so it won´t move.
Reggards
--
Alex Paquin
S/V " SIMPATICO"
Amel Maramu
Hull #94, 1981

Mark McGovern
 

Paul,

Cara is a 2004 Super Maramu with 1885 hours on the engine.  The rubber on the rear mounts were completely shot.

--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD USA