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Volvo TMD22 Timing Belt


mondra@...
 

Volvo powered owners,

In contemplating the replacement of the timing belt, I note that, for example, Parts4Engines packages the timing belt along with the tensioner and idler. I could not find in the Volvo service manual that those additional items should be routinely replaced as well. What have other owners experienced regarding the tensioner and idler? These parts, at least from Parts4Engines, are considerably more expensive than just the timing belt.

Thanks,

Mike Ondra

Aletes SM#240


Germain Jean-Pierre
 

Hi Mike,

I changed my Volvo belts some time ago and the mechanic recommended to change the other parts in the system too. So we did.

Be very careful for the following detail: on my engine, there is a balance hole drilled into the flywheel... we installed the locking pin in this hole by mistake.  This falsified the valve timing and we found out about the problem when turning the motor over by hand.  No damage done but could have been very expensive.

Good luck

Jean-Pierre Germain, SY Eleuthera, SM 007, Fiji 


On 1 Oct 2019, at 08:16, <mondra@...> <mondra@...> wrote:

Volvo powered owners,

In contemplating the replacement of the timing belt, I note that, for example, Parts4Engines packages the timing belt along with the tensioner and idler. I could not find in the Volvo service manual that those additional items should be routinely replaced as well. What have other owners experienced regarding the tensioner and idler? These parts, at least from Parts4Engines, are considerably more expensive than just the timing belt.

Thanks,

Mike Ondra

Aletes SM#240


Denis Elborn
 

Hi Mike,

The genuine timing belt kit which include the tensions and idle pully I bought from Keypart Ltd for 156.70 UKP. I think it’s prudent to change the pulley’s for that small amount given the cost if one fails. Not wishing to upset the timing again I also changed the water pump 90.90 UKP.

Regards, Denis
Aventura A54-113

On 1 Oct 2019, at 6:16 am, <mondra@...> <mondra@...> wrote:

Volvo powered owners,
In contemplating the replacement of the timing belt, I note that, for example, Parts4Engines packages the timing belt along with the tensioner and idler. I could not find in the Volvo service manual that those additional items should be routinely replaced as well. What have other owners experienced regarding the tensioner and idler? These parts, at least from Parts4Engines, are considerably more expensive than just the timing belt.
Thanks,
Mike Ondra
Aletes SM#240


Gary Wells
 

Just had ours replaced in Martinique by Didier at Amel.   Both pulleys came with the kit and I was given the old parts for inspection. 

While the timing belt did show some signs of wear it was still in good shape and the pulleys seemed to be perfect; smooth and easy to turn.
Still, it was a good call to replace them as now there is one less potential problem.

The motor is coming up on 6,000 hrs now and is still operating flawlessly.  (Starter Motor notwithstanding:) )

Gary W.
SM 209, Adagio
Galesville, MD USA


Mike Ondra
 

Thank you Denis, Gary, and Germain for your insights. Much appreciated.

Mike Ondra

Aletes SM#240

Chesapeake Bay

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gary Wells
Sent: Tuesday, October 1, 2019 9:17 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Volvo TMD22 Timing Belt

 

Just had ours replaced in Martinique by Didier at Amel.   Both pulleys came with the kit and I was given the old parts for inspection. 

While the timing belt did show some signs of wear it was still in good shape and the pulleys seemed to be perfect; smooth and easy to turn
Still, it was a good call to replace them as now there is one less potential problem.

The motor is coming up on 6,000 hrs now and is still operating flawlessly.  (Starter Motor notwithstanding:) )

Gary W.
SM 209, Adagio
Galesville, MD USA


Paul Osterberg
 

Hello!
I'm also planning to change the timing belt, for you who did it yourself, was it difficult? did it required any special tools?
When at it, is it anything else one should replace while at this area?
I plan to order the kit from Parts4Engine
Paul on SY Kerpa SM#259 Lagos, Portugal


Craig Briggs
 

Hi Paul,
I've done mine three times over the years - actually 4 times because I was off one cog and had a "do-over". It really is not difficult - all engines are just a bunch of nuts and bolts. I found it MUCH easier to lift the engine into the cockpit and then hug it properly, but I've got a Santorin and only about 8 inches of clearance on the belt end of the engine and I don't function very well upside down -  it may be ok to do in-situ on your SM if there's more space to work.

No special tools required. I use a cheap "pop" type tension meter and you can supplement that with a reasonable "eyeball" of the tension.  I used drill bits to lock the flywheel and camshaft although $pecial steel pins are available. Shop manual says to also lock the flywheel at the starter motor, but that's redundant with the pin in the flywheel and is just for babies - duh, disconnect the battery so nobody tries to start it.

They do sell kits with new idler and tension pulleys, but just a new belt should be sufficient, imho, and my shop manual doesn't suggest replacing the pulleys. Most important part, I found, is to carefully count the cogs between the cam shaft and fuel pump pulleys, mark them with nail polish on the pulleys and the belt. If you are one cog off it will run, but with a severe case of dyspepsia. 

It's a really fun project - you'll get some bragging rights, too!
Cheers


Paul Osterberg
 

Thank you Craig, I will give it a shot.
Paul


Karen Smith
 

When Bill recently did the timing belt on our engine, he used a good belt tension gauge, and a dial indicator to re-time the injection pump.  He also replaced the tension and idler pulleys.  They weren't expensive, and are critical bearings that are really easy to change while you have the belt off anyway.

If you look at the shop manual, one of the last steps is to reset the timing of the injection pump.  That is an important step that people seem to frequently skip. The camshaft and the crankshaft are locked in place (6mm bolts work as well as the $pecial pin$ from Volvo!) and as you tension the belt, the shaft of the injection pump will rotate--at least a little bit.  If you don't reset it, fuel injection timing will be off, and that is a bad thing.  Late injection will result in unburned fuel and reduced power, early injection can seriously damage the engine if the fuel ignites significantly before TDC. The adjustment is a little fiddly, but not hard.

It might be our imagination, but it sure looks like we accumulate a lot less soot on the hull after this job. Could fine tuning  the pump timing have helped with this chronic problem?

This is a very important project on these engines.  If the belt breaks or gets loose enough to jump a couple cogs the valves and pistons will hit each other and in seconds your engine turns into a very expensive mooring anchor. It's worth doing better than just eyeballing the belt tension, which is really high and quite hard to do by feel.


 

Karen,

Great summary!

--
CW Bill Rouse Amel Yacht Owners School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
   


On Sun, Oct 20, 2019 at 5:04 PM Karen Smith via Groups.Io <karenharmonie=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
When Bill recently did the timing belt on our engine, he used a good belt tension gauge, and a dial indicator to re-time the injection pump.  He also replaced the tension and idler pulleys.  They weren't expensive, and are critical bearings that are really easy to change while you have the belt off anyway.

If you look at the shop manual, one of the last steps is to reset the timing of the injection pump.  That is an important step that people seem to frequently skip. The camshaft and the crankshaft are locked in place (6mm bolts work as well as the $pecial pin$ from Volvo!) and as you tension the belt, the shaft of the injection pump will rotate--at least a little bit.  If you don't reset it, fuel injection timing will be off, and that is a bad thing.  Late injection will result in unburned fuel and reduced power, early injection can seriously damage the engine if the fuel ignites significantly before TDC. The adjustment is a little fiddly, but not hard.

It might be our imagination, but it sure looks like we accumulate a lot less soot on the hull after this job. Could fine tuning  the pump timing have helped with this chronic problem?

This is a very important project on these engines.  If the belt breaks or gets loose enough to jump a couple cogs the valves and pistons will hit each other and in seconds your engine turns into a very expensive mooring anchor. It's worth doing better than just eyeballing the belt tension, which is really high and quite hard to do by feel.


Paul Osterberg
 

Karen, Thank you for the information, I will give it a go.
I have a big and well regarded boat yard just around the corner, if I fail.
Paul