Topics

Holding power of Mooring Ball required for hurricanes


Eamonn Washington
 

Hi

A mooring ball is rated in terms of holding power but I don’t understand what that means.  I also don’t know what holding power is required to hold a Super Maramu in a hurricane.  Could someone please explain if a 5t holding power would be sufficient or inadequate? 

I am trying to figure out what is the best option, to leave the boat on the hard (chocked and tied down) or in a marina (spider web of lines) or on a mooring ball.  We wish to leave our boat in Grenada during the hurricane season while we will be away the entire time.  (We will have someone check it regularly.)

Should the water tank be full or empty?  I guess if storing on land more weight is better, and in water less weight is better, but I am guessing.

Thanks
Eamonn Washington
Travel Bug
Super Maramu #151
Currently in Grenada


Matt Salatino
 

The best protection from a direct hurricane hit is 100 nm.
Grenada was hit by Ivan in 2004. It damaged most of the boats there. Grenada has learned since, and has improved their yard storage.
Grenada, though on the south edge of the “box”, has seen a dozen or more hurricanes in the past 70 years. If I were to spend the season aboard, Grenada would be my choice. Given all big storms in that region originate in Africa, you have at least 5 days notice to hop 80 miles to Trinidad.
Trinidad is out of the box. 3 hurricanes in 100 years. Two dozen tropical storms. When we were in the eastern Carib, we chose to leave the boat, on the hard, in Trinidad. 
Do NOT leave a boat you value, long term, unattended on a mooring. No one your paying to “watch” it will renew the mooring pennants during a storm. Your lines will chafe. You’ll lose the boat.
So, my recommendation.
Trinidad to leave the boat. Grenada to live aboard for the summer.

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Feb 12, 2020, at 8:28 PM, Eamonn Washington <eamonn.washington@...> wrote:

Hi

A mooring ball is rated in terms of holding power but I don’t understand what that means.  I also don’t know what holding power is required to hold a Super Maramu in a hurricane.  Could someone please explain if a 5t holding power would be sufficient or inadequate? 

I am trying to figure out what is the best option, to leave the boat on the hard (chocked and tied down) or in a marina (spider web of lines) or on a mooring ball.  We wish to leave our boat in Grenada during the hurricane season while we will be away the entire time.  (We will have someone check it regularly.)

Should the water tank be full or empty?  I guess if storing on land more weight is better, and in water less weight is better, but I am guessing.

Thanks
Eamonn Washington
Travel Bug
Super Maramu #151
Currently in Grenada


ngtnewington Newington
 

I would not leave the boat in the water during hurricane season in Grenada....
Stored ashore is still a risk but much safer. As Matt says sail to Trinidad.
There are several good yards in Chaguaramus  to store the boat ashore, the price is much the same...the only problem with Trinidad is that the water is dirty from oil so when you launch you want to be ready to leave to either Tobago, which is a day motor against wind and current or an overnight to Grenada.


Nick
Amelia AML54-019


On 13 Feb 2020, at 02:14, Matt Salatino via Groups.Io <helmsmatt@...> wrote:

The best protection from a direct hurricane hit is 100 nm.
Grenada was hit by Ivan in 2004. It damaged most of the boats there. Grenada has learned since, and has improved their yard storage.
Grenada, though on the south edge of the “box”, has seen a dozen or more hurricanes in the past 70 years. If I were to spend the season aboard, Grenada would be my choice. Given all big storms in that region originate in Africa, you have at least 5 days notice to hop 80 miles to Trinidad.
Trinidad is out of the box. 3 hurricanes in 100 years. Two dozen tropical storms. When we were in the eastern Carib, we chose to leave the boat, on the hard, in Trinidad. 
Do NOT leave a boat you value, long term, unattended on a mooring. No one your paying to “watch” it will renew the mooring pennants during a storm. Your lines will chafe. You’ll lose the boat.
So, my recommendation.
Trinidad to leave the boat. Grenada to live aboard for the summer.

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Feb 12, 2020, at 8:28 PM, Eamonn Washington <eamonn.washington@...> wrote:

Hi

A mooring ball is rated in terms of holding power but I don’t understand what that means.  I also don’t know what holding power is required to hold a Super Maramu in a hurricane.  Could someone please explain if a 5t holding power would be sufficient or inadequate? 

I am trying to figure out what is the best option, to leave the boat on the hard (chocked and tied down) or in a marina (spider web of lines) or on a mooring ball.  We wish to leave our boat in Grenada during the hurricane season while we will be away the entire time.  (We will have someone check it regularly.)

Should the water tank be full or empty?  I guess if storing on land more weight is better, and in water less weight is better, but I am guessing.

Thanks
Eamonn Washington
Travel Bug
Super Maramu #151
Currently in Grenada


David Pawley
 

5 tons sounds a lot, it kind of means that if a tug boat gave 5 tons of thrust it could lift 5 tons in weight.(Most of the tugs I worked on were greater than 80T). Don't know about elsewhere but when Cyclone Leanne (think?) hit the Whitsundays a few years ago, maybe 150 boats are still missing ie they were moored and the wrench effect pulled off the bow fitting and the vessels subsequently sank due to water ingress.

On Thu, 13 Feb 2020 at 17:02, ngtnewington Newington via Groups.Io <ngtnewington=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
I would not leave the boat in the water during hurricane season in Grenada....
Stored ashore is still a risk but much safer. As Matt says sail to Trinidad.
There are several good yards in Chaguaramus  to store the boat ashore, the price is much the same...the only problem with Trinidad is that the water is dirty from oil so when you launch you want to be ready to leave to either Tobago, which is a day motor against wind and current or an overnight to Grenada.


Nick
Amelia AML54-019


On 13 Feb 2020, at 02:14, Matt Salatino via Groups.Io <helmsmatt=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

The best protection from a direct hurricane hit is 100 nm.
Grenada was hit by Ivan in 2004. It damaged most of the boats there. Grenada has learned since, and has improved their yard storage.
Grenada, though on the south edge of the “box”, has seen a dozen or more hurricanes in the past 70 years. If I were to spend the season aboard, Grenada would be my choice. Given all big storms in that region originate in Africa, you have at least 5 days notice to hop 80 miles to Trinidad.
Trinidad is out of the box. 3 hurricanes in 100 years. Two dozen tropical storms. When we were in the eastern Carib, we chose to leave the boat, on the hard, in Trinidad. 
Do NOT leave a boat you value, long term, unattended on a mooring. No one your paying to “watch” it will renew the mooring pennants during a storm. Your lines will chafe. You’ll lose the boat.
So, my recommendation.
Trinidad to leave the boat. Grenada to live aboard for the summer.

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Feb 12, 2020, at 8:28 PM, Eamonn Washington <eamonn.washington@...> wrote:

Hi

A mooring ball is rated in terms of holding power but I don’t understand what that means.  I also don’t know what holding power is required to hold a Super Maramu in a hurricane.  Could someone please explain if a 5t holding power would be sufficient or inadequate? 

I am trying to figure out what is the best option, to leave the boat on the hard (chocked and tied down) or in a marina (spider web of lines) or on a mooring ball.  We wish to leave our boat in Grenada during the hurricane season while we will be away the entire time.  (We will have someone check it regularly.)

Should the water tank be full or empty?  I guess if storing on land more weight is better, and in water less weight is better, but I am guessing.

Thanks
Eamonn Washington
Travel Bug
Super Maramu #151
Currently in Grenada


Giorgio Ardrizzi
 

In May I will return to the third consecutive season at Trinidad where I will leave the boat at the Peake' Shipyard. I always found myself very well, the staff is efficient, the security service is very effective and prices are lower than in Grenada or in the other islands.
I will be away for at least 6 months and I want to sleep quietly without worrying about possible hurricane or mooring or marinas at risk.
Some yachtman was impressed by the news of probable attacks by pirates, but the coast guard is carefully wandering the coast and no such cases were reported in the last year.

Giorgio Ardrizzi
sy Saudade III - Sharki #1
currently in Martinique


Gary Silver
 

Hi Eamonn:

I can speak to the "in a marina (spider web of lines" idea.  DON'T DO IT!!!!  I was in Puerto Del Rey marina during Irma and Maria (cat 4 & 5),  Boat stripped, spider web of lines (11), many doubled up,  many many fenders (14) (tied to dock and the boat).  Liahona survived but was damaged.  Half of the fenders weren't found, the remaining half were destroyed.  Boats on either side of me sank. YOU ARE NOT SAFE IN A SLIP NO MATTER WHAT YOU DO. Cloud Street (an Amel SM on the dock behind me had a 65 boat break free from, out dock and come down on her.  As a testament to how stout Amel boats are, Cloud street survived with repairable damage while the boat that hit her sunk next to her.

In a slip you are dealing with storm surge and wind as well as other boats and flying debris.  In PDR (Puerto Del Rey) some boats floated up over top of their docks due to surge.  You are also hazarded by other boats around you.  There is only one of this hazards you can mitigate, on the hard you do away with storm surge issues.   On the hard the boat must be strapped down onto deep set anchors.  The jack stands will fall away/be washed away, or sink in the wet ground.  Only the straps will save you.  Even jack stands welded together is no guarantee.   Many boats on the hard in PDR had the jack stands gone and were supported only by the tie down straps following the storm. In PDR they have a re-inforced concrete grid of footings/anchors buried many feet deep in the ground.  Those proved themselves.  Even a cradle is no guarantee unless it is strapped down.   

I concur that leaving a boat on a mooring in a storm is extremely unwise no matter how big the mooring.

The above is hard earned from my actual experience. 

Wish you the best, 

Gary S. Silver, M.D.
s/v Liahona
Amel SM 2000  #335
Puerto Del Rey Marina, Puerto Rico


Mark Erdos
 

Eamonn,

 

I am very familiar with the options in Grenada. If your thought is to leave the boat in Prickly Bay unattended, this is a very bad idea. Beside the boat burglaries, the bay is very open and offers not protection from anything  southerly. In a named storm with rotation this bay will be treacherous. I addition, I seriously doubt if the moorings in this bay are maintained to any standard. Many cruisers stay there during the storm season but the main reason being it is cheap.

 

The St. Louis Marina has good protection and is protected by a mountain range on three sides. However, you are at the mercy of other owners securing their vessels. We were there for a tropical storm threat and very few boats had someone tending them. (our plan while in Grenada for a big named storm was to run south).

 

The boat yards in Grenada are also questionable. They do have the ability to strap down boats but again, not the best idea. Look back at the pictures of Ivan.

 

The bottom line, I do not think I would leave a boat unattended in Grenada during the hurricane season.

 

Have you considered Curacao in the ABCs they are on the bottom edge of the hurricane belt with a lower probability of being hit than Grenada. There is a great yard the with excellent security: Curacao Marine. To fly out, hop to Aruba where you can fly direct cheaply to pretty much anywhere. When back on the boat after hurricane season, you can easily sail to the Eastern Caribbean again on a beam reach. Curacao Marine also has the capability for you to bring back parts duty free.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Galapagos

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Eamonn Washington
Sent: Wednesday, February 12, 2020 9:28 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Holding power of Mooring Ball required for hurricanes

 

Hi

A mooring ball is rated in terms of holding power but I don’t understand what that means.  I also don’t know what holding power is required to hold a Super Maramu in a hurricane.  Could someone please explain if a 5t holding power would be sufficient or inadequate? 

I am trying to figure out what is the best option, to leave the boat on the hard (chocked and tied down) or in a marina (spider web of lines) or on a mooring ball.  We wish to leave our boat in Grenada during the hurricane season while we will be away the entire time.  (We will have someone check it regularly.)

Should the water tank be full or empty?  I guess if storing on land more weight is better, and in water less weight is better, but I am guessing.

Thanks
Eamonn Washington
Travel Bug
Super Maramu #151
Currently in Grenada


Eamonn Washington
 

Hi

thanks to all for the great advice.  Your personal experiences are a great help.  I had not considered that the cleat on the foredeck might get ripped out.

So I will not leave the boat in Grenada and consider Trinidad (Peake) or Curacao (Curacao Marine), on the hard with tie downs.  I am aware that they are not fully out of the hurricane zone, but the risk is much lower there.

Thanks
Eamonn Washington
Travel Bug
Super Maramu #151
Currently in Grenada.


Matt Salatino
 

Trinidad has Peake’s (we hauled out their), Power Boats, also very good, and Coral Cove. A bit less expensive, but they are all negotiable.
It’s out of the hurricane zone.

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Feb 13, 2020, at 8:09 PM, Eamonn Washington <eamonn.washington@...> wrote:

Hi

thanks to all for the great advice.  Your personal experiences are a great help.  I had not considered that the cleat on the foredeck might get ripped out.

So I will not leave the boat in Grenada and consider Trinidad (Peake) or Curacao (Curacao Marine), on the hard with tie downs.  I am aware that they are not fully out of the hurricane zone, but the risk is much lower there.

Thanks
Eamonn Washington
Travel Bug
Super Maramu #151
Currently in Grenada.


Dan Carlson
 

Good morning,. If you go to Peake in Trinidad, there is a good chance you will see us there this year.  We hauled there in 2017 and are planning to head back.  We also hauled in Curacao in 2018 and that was good for is as well. That decision should be based on your cruising plans for the next year.  Curacao is a good stop if you are heading west, but not if you want another pass up and down the eastern Caribbean. 

Daniel and Lori Carlson on sv BeBe, sm#387, currently in Cartagena, Columbia 


On Wed, Feb 12, 2020, 8:28 PM Eamonn Washington <eamonn.washington@...> wrote:
Hi

A mooring ball is rated in terms of holding power but I don’t understand what that means.  I also don’t know what holding power is required to hold a Super Maramu in a hurricane.  Could someone please explain if a 5t holding power would be sufficient or inadequate? 

I am trying to figure out what is the best option, to leave the boat on the hard (chocked and tied down) or in a marina (spider web of lines) or on a mooring ball.  We wish to leave our boat in Grenada during the hurricane season while we will be away the entire time.  (We will have someone check it regularly.)

Should the water tank be full or empty?  I guess if storing on land more weight is better, and in water less weight is better, but I am guessing.

Thanks
Eamonn Washington
Travel Bug
Super Maramu #151
Currently in Grenada


Mark Erdos
 

Hi Dan,

 

We found most of the people in Curacao had no plans to head west after the season during our 6 month stay living aboard in the ABCs. They took full advantage of the Nov-Dec SE winds to sail the 500 miles (3-4 days) to the Virgin Islands on a beam reach positioning themselves for another loop through the eastern Caribbean.

 

In addition, I think I should mention the safety precautions a boat needs to take in order to passage to Trinidad.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Galapagos

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dan Carlson
Sent: Friday, February 14, 2020 8:56 AM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Holding power of Mooring Ball required for hurricanes

 

Good morning,. If you go to Peake in Trinidad, there is a good chance you will see us there this year.  We hauled there in 2017 and are planning to head back.  We also hauled in Curacao in 2018 and that was good for is as well. That decision should be based on your cruising plans for the next year.  Curacao is a good stop if you are heading west, but not if you want another pass up and down the eastern Caribbean. 

 

Daniel and Lori Carlson on sv BeBe, sm#387, currently in Cartagena, Columbia 

 

 

On Wed, Feb 12, 2020, 8:28 PM Eamonn Washington <eamonn.washington@...> wrote:

Hi

A mooring ball is rated in terms of holding power but I don’t understand what that means.  I also don’t know what holding power is required to hold a Super Maramu in a hurricane.  Could someone please explain if a 5t holding power would be sufficient or inadequate? 

I am trying to figure out what is the best option, to leave the boat on the hard (chocked and tied down) or in a marina (spider web of lines) or on a mooring ball.  We wish to leave our boat in Grenada during the hurricane season while we will be away the entire time.  (We will have someone check it regularly.)

Should the water tank be full or empty?  I guess if storing on land more weight is better, and in water less weight is better, but I am guessing.

Thanks
Eamonn Washington
Travel Bug
Super Maramu #151
Currently in Grenada