Topics

More Options for Rub Rail Inserts


 

Bill & Karen, thanks for doing this.
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Wed, May 27, 2020 at 9:52 PM Karen Smith via groups.io <karenharmonie=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

With at least some businesses coming back on line in some areas, we are going to try again to put together a group of Amel owners who are looking to improve the appearance of their boats.

 

The rubber inserts that act as gutters along the top of the rubrail on the Super Maramu and Santorin have been occasionally available from Amel, but as heavy, bulky items shipping costs have been high from Europe to North America.

 

On our boat, SM #160, the rubber inserts are a faded, chalky, red with crumbling edges, and with every rain they wash a little bit more red mud down the hull.  It is time for them to go.

 

Just before the virus business disruptions hit hard, we had identified a custom extrusion company who could reproduce these for us in white EDPM, the most UV resistant rubber compound available.  All of the Super Maramus and Santorin used the same rubrail design, even those toward the end of the production run that had hard PVC gutters.  Custom colors (i.e., not white) are not going to be a cost effective option.

 

If your rub rail gutters are showing their age, and looking a bit ratty, or have been damaged, here is the chance for a significant cosmetic upgrade.

 

Until I get updated quotes, I can’t promise a price, but I’d expect less than $900–delivered by UPS—anywhere in the USA.  (Hawaii is possible, but can’t promise a delivery cost there yet.) The more people we have signed up, the more we can spread the setup costs, and the cheaper it gets.  The last delivered price I saw from Amel was over $2300.

 

Terms would be:  50% deposit to secure the order and lock in the price, and 50% when ready to ship.  Once the production run is set up and scheduled, we can’t add more later, so we’ll need to know everybody interested ahead of time. Reply to get on our list...  No money need yet, certainly not until we have a firm price and schedule.

 

If you did not get an email from us in the past week or so, you have somehow dropped off our radar, so let us know you are still interested.  

 

Not sure on timing yet, but requests for quote have gone out. I am hoping some of these places are hungry for business.


Karen Smith
 

With at least some businesses coming back on line in some areas, we are going to try again to put together a group of Amel owners who are looking to improve the appearance of their boats.

 

The rubber inserts that act as gutters along the top of the rubrail on the Super Maramu and Santorin have been occasionally available from Amel, but as heavy, bulky items shipping costs have been high from Europe to North America.

 

On our boat, SM #160, the rubber inserts are a faded, chalky, red with crumbling edges, and with every rain they wash a little bit more red mud down the hull.  It is time for them to go.

 

Just before the virus business disruptions hit hard, we had identified a custom extrusion company who could reproduce these for us in white EDPM, the most UV resistant rubber compound available.  All of the Super Maramus and Santorin used the same rubrail design, even those toward the end of the production run that had hard PVC gutters.  Custom colors (i.e., not white) are not going to be a cost effective option.

 

If your rub rail gutters are showing their age, and looking a bit ratty, or have been damaged, here is the chance for a significant cosmetic upgrade.

 

Until I get updated quotes, I can’t promise a price, but I’d expect less than $900–delivered by UPS—anywhere in the USA.  (Hawaii is possible, but can’t promise a delivery cost there yet.) The more people we have signed up, the more we can spread the setup costs, and the cheaper it gets.  The last delivered price I saw from Amel was over $2300.

 

Terms would be:  50% deposit to secure the order and lock in the price, and 50% when ready to ship.  Once the production run is set up and scheduled, we can’t add more later, so we’ll need to know everybody interested ahead of time. Reply to get on our list...  No money need yet, certainly not until we have a firm price and schedule.

 

If you did not get an email from us in the past week or so, you have somehow dropped off our radar, so let us know you are still interested.  

 

Not sure on timing yet, but requests for quote have gone out. I am hoping some of these places are hungry for business.


Karen Smith
 

Right now we have eight people on the list.
  • Pat McAneny 
  • Kent Robertson
  • Joel Potter
  • Steven Davis
  • Dave Wilcox
  • Jeremey Hermans
  • Mark Garver
  • Eric Freedman
Plus one for Harmonie, makes nine. If I missed anyone, give a shout!

I am sending an email to everybody who expressed interest with status and details so we don't clog up the group here.  If anybody else wants to get on the list, send an email to "greatketch (at) yahoo . com"  We'll have a final price, including a shipping estimate, by the end of the week.  We'll be finalizing the production run shortly after that.  

I am expecting we'll be getting white, like the more recent production runs from Amel.  Matching the original "red" would be a custom formulation and quite a bit more expensive.


Patrick McAneny
 

Karen ,How many plan to buy the rub rail as of now ? Perhaps you should put out a last call ,before placing the order. It will never be cheaper ,if you are in the US.. I assume the more orders the cheaper per unit price .Thanks to you and Bill for looking into this.
Pat
SM#123


-----Original Message-----
From: Karen Smith via Groups.Io <karenharmonie@...>
To: main <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Sent: Sat, Mar 7, 2020 3:39 pm
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] More Options for Rub Rail Inserts

Mark,

We got you!


Karen Smith
 

Mark,

We got you!


Mark Garver
 

Karen, 

I wanted to make sure we were still on the list.

Thanks,

Mark
S/V It’s Good
SM #105
Gloucester, VA


On Mar 6, 2020, at 5:40 PM, Karen Smith via Groups.Io <karenharmonie@...> wrote:

We have enough people interested in signing on, it's looking like a go.  We'll be in touch with the manufacturer Monday morning to deliver a sample off Harmonie so they can design the die, get details, and finalize price and schedule.

So if you are on the fence about it, get in touch and let us know you're interested.


Karen Smith
 

We have enough people interested in signing on, it's looking like a go.  We'll be in touch with the manufacturer Monday morning to deliver a sample off Harmonie so they can design the die, get details, and finalize price and schedule.

So if you are on the fence about it, get in touch and let us know you're interested.


Patrick McAneny
 

Karen, On my property I have two ponds, a stream and two waterfalls all lined with EPDM , the liner is supposed to last at least twenty years. However I built another pond for a house I built 32 yrs.ago for a client, and that liner is still intact ,and some of it has been exposed to partial sun all these yrs. So its tuff stuff. I will leave mine long as Gary Silver suggested , and cut it a bit short if its hot ,or leave long if cooler .  Count me in if you put it together, 
Thanks,
Pat
SM#123


-----Original Message-----
From: Karen Smith via Groups.Io <karenharmonie@...>
To: main <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Sent: Fri, Mar 6, 2020 3:57 pm
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] More Options for Rub Rail Inserts

We do not yet know for sure what the old inserts are made of, but EDPM rubber is used uncovered as a membrane for flat roofs, and typically has a warranted life span of 30 years.

Rubber like this is actually only about 25% EDPM plastic.  They are roughly 50% "filler/pigment".  For black rubber, this might be carbon black, for white it would be titanium dioxide, for red it would be a blend of iron oxide.  The rest of the formulation is various "oils" that serve to make it "rubbery" instead of brittle. If the wrong oils are used, they can evaporate over time, and the whole part shrinks.  We will confirm the long term dimensional stability of the extrusion with the manufacturer.  I'm thinking that over 50 feet, shrinkage of 1" is tolerable, leaving just a bit more of a gap at the back of the rail than it started with.  That's about 0.2%, and gives me a number to look for.


Karen Smith
 

We do not yet know for sure what the old inserts are made of, but EDPM rubber is used uncovered as a membrane for flat roofs, and typically has a warranted life span of 30 years.

Rubber like this is actually only about 25% EDPM plastic.  They are roughly 50% "filler/pigment".  For black rubber, this might be carbon black, for white it would be titanium dioxide, for red it would be a blend of iron oxide.  The rest of the formulation is various "oils" that serve to make it "rubbery" instead of brittle. If the wrong oils are used, they can evaporate over time, and the whole part shrinks.  We will confirm the long term dimensional stability of the extrusion with the manufacturer.  I'm thinking that over 50 feet, shrinkage of 1" is tolerable, leaving just a bit more of a gap at the back of the rail than it started with.  That's about 0.2%, and gives me a number to look for.


karkauai
 

Hi Joel, thanks for that info.  We are looking at a paint made specifically for EPDM.  Do you know if anyone has tried that?  Is the OEM insert made of EPDM?
Thanks again
Kent and Iris
SM 243
Kristy

On Mar 6, 2020 1:52 PM, amelforme <jfpottercys@...> wrote:

Once again, more than you ever wanted to know about something Amel,

 

As preparing Amel boats for resale has been a major part of my life for nearly 40 years now, putting the best face forward to new prospects is important, especially the first moments they see the boat. You never get a second chance to make a first impression.

All the Amel synthetic rubber rub rails such as on the older Kirk, Euros , Meltem, Sharki, Maramu and Mango and then the scupper/filler type on the Santorin and all but the last series of Red Line Super Maramu 2000’s are generally one of the hardest items to make look like new for more than a month or so once the sun has had its way with them. Once they get sun scorched and dry, nothing really brings them back much beyond preservation stage.

 

As our main concern seems to be Santorin and Super Maramu, I can tell everyone for certain that there is but one “size/profile” for the rub rail insert be it brown or white, Santorin or Super Maramu of all production years. The width between the inner edge of the rub rail to the outside of the bulwark is the same for both models. Just to be absolutely 100% sure of this, I asked Olivier to verify this and he was pleased to do so.

 

On the last of the SM 2000 series, 2004 until the end and the Amel 54, Amel installed a hard PVC insert that had as much ultra-violet protectant stirred in as chemistry would allow, so I was told. This true improvement also fits but is a real challenge to install without breaking it and is also a pain to ship as it is more rigid so bigger circles are required. It is quite a bit lighter , though. I did a side on two different boats that had some hurricane damage and it was such a PITA that I forced myself to forget how to do it least I would be required to do it again. Not for faint hearts, stick with the synthetic rubber.

 

I hope Bill Kinney can come up with the replacement being discussed. I’ll probably join in to keep some in reserve, as long as it has more anti ultra-violet agent than what it replaces.

 

All The Best, Joel       

 

       JOEL F. POTTER-CRUISING YACHT SPECIALIST~L.L.C.

                                           THE  EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY

UNSURPASSED AMEL MARKETING EXPERIENCE AND PRODUCT KNOWLEDGE

                                   Office 954-462-5869  Cell 954-812-2485

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Karen Smith via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, March 5, 2020 9:24 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] More Options for Rub Rail Inserts

 

Eventually, UV exposure takes its toll. The surface finish can be restored in any number of ways, but eventually, the thin edges of the rubber begin to crumble. At that point it is only a matter of time before things go further and the rubber fails.

If your insert is in good shape, a regular application of 303 will help keep the UV at bay. Ours is old enough that the thin edges have become brittle and started to crack, there isn't anything that will bring that back. 



karkauai
 

Thanks Karen/Bill, we are interested depending on price.  We'd have to take it with us on a plane.

Iris looked up EPDM and found a potential problem of shrinkage when used on roofs.  Can you ask the manufacturer what we could expect in that regard.

Thanks again.
Kent and Iris Robertson
SM 243
Kristy

On Mar 3, 2020 5:24 PM, "Karen Smith via Groups.Io" <karenharmonie@...> wrote:

Hey group,

 

We have done a little digging into the possibility of US based production options for the rub rail inserts. Seems a good option instead of shipping relatively inexpensive, yet bulky and heavy material across the ocean.

Companies doing custom, short-run rubber extrusions are pretty common in the industry. We contacted a local manufacturer who specializes in things like rub rails for inflatable boats to see if they could produce the Amel rub rail insert in low quantity and at reasonable cost. 

 

The basic answer is, yes they can. They have seen a dimensioned drawing of the insert, and confirmed that they can make it without technical difficulty. It would be made of EDPM, the premier rubber formulation for UV exposure. Not sure about color yet.

 

There isn’t enough information yet to set a hard price, but it looks like the MAXIMUM cost would be $800 per boat, and it could be as little as half that, plus UPS domestic ground shipping.

 

The process would look like this:  If we get enough interest, I’ll trim a bit off my insert and give to the engineers so they can finalize the design of an extrusion die.  They then run off a prototype piece and I would test it for fit on my boat.  If all is good, a 50% deposit would hold a place in the production run.

 

If there is sufficient interest, we could have material in hand in 3 weeks.

 

At this point we have gone as far as we can go without having a read if there is enough interest in going further, so if this is something you’d want to participate in, or if you just have questions, drop an e-mail to greatketch@...

Karen Smith,
Bill Kinney
SM Harmonie #160
Fort Lauderdale, FL



amelforme
 

Once again, more than you ever wanted to know about something Amel,

 

As preparing Amel boats for resale has been a major part of my life for nearly 40 years now, putting the best face forward to new prospects is important, especially the first moments they see the boat. You never get a second chance to make a first impression.

All the Amel synthetic rubber rub rails such as on the older Kirk, Euros , Meltem, Sharki, Maramu and Mango and then the scupper/filler type on the Santorin and all but the last series of Red Line Super Maramu 2000’s are generally one of the hardest items to make look like new for more than a month or so once the sun has had its way with them. Once they get sun scorched and dry, nothing really brings them back much beyond preservation stage.

 

As our main concern seems to be Santorin and Super Maramu, I can tell everyone for certain that there is but one “size/profile” for the rub rail insert be it brown or white, Santorin or Super Maramu of all production years. The width between the inner edge of the rub rail to the outside of the bulwark is the same for both models. Just to be absolutely 100% sure of this, I asked Olivier to verify this and he was pleased to do so.

 

On the last of the SM 2000 series, 2004 until the end and the Amel 54, Amel installed a hard PVC insert that had as much ultra-violet protectant stirred in as chemistry would allow, so I was told. This true improvement also fits but is a real challenge to install without breaking it and is also a pain to ship as it is more rigid so bigger circles are required. It is quite a bit lighter , though. I did a side on two different boats that had some hurricane damage and it was such a PITA that I forced myself to forget how to do it least I would be required to do it again. Not for faint hearts, stick with the synthetic rubber.

 

I hope Bill Kinney can come up with the replacement being discussed. I’ll probably join in to keep some in reserve, as long as it has more anti ultra-violet agent than what it replaces.

 

All The Best, Joel       

 

       JOEL F. POTTER-CRUISING YACHT SPECIALIST~L.L.C.

                                           THE  EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY

UNSURPASSED AMEL MARKETING EXPERIENCE AND PRODUCT KNOWLEDGE

                                   Office 954-462-5869  Cell 954-812-2485

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Karen Smith via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, March 5, 2020 9:24 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] More Options for Rub Rail Inserts

 

Eventually, UV exposure takes its toll. The surface finish can be restored in any number of ways, but eventually, the thin edges of the rubber begin to crumble. At that point it is only a matter of time before things go further and the rubber fails.

If your insert is in good shape, a regular application of 303 will help keep the UV at bay. Ours is old enough that the thin edges have become brittle and started to crack, there isn't anything that will bring that back. 


Karen Smith
 

Eventually, UV exposure takes its toll. The surface finish can be restored in any number of ways, but eventually, the thin edges of the rubber begin to crumble. At that point it is only a matter of time before things go further and the rubber fails.

If your insert is in good shape, a regular application of 303 will help keep the UV at bay. Ours is old enough that the thin edges have become brittle and started to crack, there isn't anything that will bring that back. 


Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi All,

Regarding the rubber insert to the rub rail. I bring mine back by applying and rubbing in 3M boat cleaner polish as is used on the gel coat. Looks good.

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 06 March 2020 at 04:36 "Mike Ondra via Groups.Io" <mdondra@...> wrote:

With all the talk about rubrail replacement, I am curious as to why?

Ours certainly is chalky, but I wonder if there is a treatment to remove a thin layer of the material down to a “new” surface. Or apply a “permanent” coating on top of the chalky surface.

Mike Ondra

Aletes SM#240

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Patrick McAneny via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, March 5, 2020 7:30 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] More Options for Rub Rail Inserts

 

Karen, I certainly want to replace my rub rail , having it produced and available in the US. without shipping from France ,would make it much cheaper and more available for boats located on this side of the pond , keep me posted .

Thanks,

Pat

SM Shenanigans

-----Original Message-----
From: Karen Smith via Groups.Io <karenharmonie@...>
To: main <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Sent: Tue, Mar 3, 2020 4:24 pm
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] More Options for Rub Rail Inserts

Hey group,

 

We have done a little digging into the possibility of US based production options for the rub rail inserts. Seems a good option instead of shipping relatively inexpensive, yet bulky and heavy material across the ocean.

Companies doing custom, short-run rubber extrusions are pretty common in the industry. We contacted a local manufacturer who specializes in things like rub rails for inflatable boats to see if they could produce the Amel rub rail insert in low quantity and at reasonable cost. 

 

The basic answer is, yes they can. They have seen a dimensioned drawing of the insert, and confirmed that they can make it without technical difficulty. It would be made of EDPM, the premier rubber formulation for UV exposure. Not sure about color yet.

 

There isn’t enough information yet to set a hard price, but it looks like the MAXIMUM cost would be $800 per boat, and it could be as little as half that, plus UPS domestic ground shipping.

 

The process would look like this:  If we get enough interest, I’ll trim a bit off my insert and give to the engineers so they can finalize the design of an extrusion die.  They then run off a prototype piece and I would test it for fit on my boat.  If all is good, a 50% deposit would hold a place in the production run.

 

If there is sufficient interest, we could have material in hand in 3 weeks.

 

At this point we have gone as far as we can go without having a read if there is enough interest in going further, so if this is something you’d want to participate in, or if you just have questions, drop an e-mail to greatketch@...

Karen Smith,
Bill Kinney
SM Harmonie #160
Fort Lauderdale, FL

 



 


 


Patrick McAneny
 

Mike, Speaking for myself, I will give a couple of my reasons.
1 . I need to take the old one off to paint my rub rail ,it already has a couple of cracks and probably more after removing it and reinstalling.
2. I have always hated the color, and it will not go well with my newly painted forest green rub rail, white will look much better.
3. The chalk is a pain,gets on me and the hull when touched.
4. It is a bit short ,shrunk a bit I guess ,used to be longer.
5. Its not going to last the life of the boat , so might as well replace it now.
6. Others are interested and by buying and or shipping now as a group will save approx. $1300. or more ,opposed to what one set shipped via Fed Ex air from France would cost.

 We took my boat down to Haven Harbor yesterday for repairs and to be Awlgripped , so we may see you and Tom in Rock Hall,this spring. Greta mention Aletes yesterday when we hauled out.
Pat
SM Shenanigans


-----Original Message-----
From: Mike Ondra via Groups.Io <mdondra@...>
To: main <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Sent: Thu, Mar 5, 2020 10:36 am
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] More Options for Rub Rail Inserts

With all the talk about rubrail replacement, I am curious as to why?
Ours certainly is chalky, but I wonder if there is a treatment to remove a thin layer of the material down to a “new” surface. Or apply a “permanent” coating on top of the chalky surface.
Mike Ondra
Aletes SM#240
 
From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Patrick McAneny via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, March 5, 2020 7:30 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] More Options for Rub Rail Inserts
 
Karen, I certainly want to replace my rub rail , having it produced and available in the US. without shipping from France ,would make it much cheaper and more available for boats located on this side of the pond , keep me posted .
Thanks,
Pat
SM Shenanigans

-----Original Message-----
From: Karen Smith via Groups.Io <karenharmonie@...>
To: main <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Sent: Tue, Mar 3, 2020 4:24 pm
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] More Options for Rub Rail Inserts
Hey group,
 
We have done a little digging into the possibility of US based production options for the rub rail inserts. Seems a good option instead of shipping relatively inexpensive, yet bulky and heavy material across the ocean.

Companies doing custom, short-run rubber extrusions are pretty common in the industry. We contacted a local manufacturer who specializes in things like rub rails for inflatable boats to see if they could produce the Amel rub rail insert in low quantity and at reasonable cost. 
 
The basic answer is, yes they can. They have seen a dimensioned drawing of the insert, and confirmed that they can make it without technical difficulty. It would be made of EDPM, the premier rubber formulation for UV exposure. Not sure about color yet.
 
There isn’t enough information yet to set a hard price, but it looks like the MAXIMUM cost would be $800 per boat, and it could be as little as half that, plus UPS domestic ground shipping.
 
The process would look like this:  If we get enough interest, I’ll trim a bit off my insert and give to the engineers so they can finalize the design of an extrusion die.  They then run off a prototype piece and I would test it for fit on my boat.  If all is good, a 50% deposit would hold a place in the production run.
 
If there is sufficient interest, we could have material in hand in 3 weeks.
 
At this point we have gone as far as we can go without having a read if there is enough interest in going further, so if this is something you’d want to participate in, or if you just have questions, drop an e-mail to greatketch@...

Karen Smith,
Bill Kinney
SM Harmonie #160
Fort Lauderdale, FL


Mike Ondra
 

With all the talk about rubrail replacement, I am curious as to why?

Ours certainly is chalky, but I wonder if there is a treatment to remove a thin layer of the material down to a “new” surface. Or apply a “permanent” coating on top of the chalky surface.

Mike Ondra

Aletes SM#240

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Patrick McAneny via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, March 5, 2020 7:30 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] More Options for Rub Rail Inserts

 

Karen, I certainly want to replace my rub rail , having it produced and available in the US. without shipping from France ,would make it much cheaper and more available for boats located on this side of the pond , keep me posted .

Thanks,

Pat

SM Shenanigans

-----Original Message-----
From: Karen Smith via Groups.Io <karenharmonie@...>
To: main <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Sent: Tue, Mar 3, 2020 4:24 pm
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] More Options for Rub Rail Inserts

Hey group,

 

We have done a little digging into the possibility of US based production options for the rub rail inserts. Seems a good option instead of shipping relatively inexpensive, yet bulky and heavy material across the ocean.

Companies doing custom, short-run rubber extrusions are pretty common in the industry. We contacted a local manufacturer who specializes in things like rub rails for inflatable boats to see if they could produce the Amel rub rail insert in low quantity and at reasonable cost. 

 

The basic answer is, yes they can. They have seen a dimensioned drawing of the insert, and confirmed that they can make it without technical difficulty. It would be made of EDPM, the premier rubber formulation for UV exposure. Not sure about color yet.

 

There isn’t enough information yet to set a hard price, but it looks like the MAXIMUM cost would be $800 per boat, and it could be as little as half that, plus UPS domestic ground shipping.

 

The process would look like this:  If we get enough interest, I’ll trim a bit off my insert and give to the engineers so they can finalize the design of an extrusion die.  They then run off a prototype piece and I would test it for fit on my boat.  If all is good, a 50% deposit would hold a place in the production run.

 

If there is sufficient interest, we could have material in hand in 3 weeks.

 

At this point we have gone as far as we can go without having a read if there is enough interest in going further, so if this is something you’d want to participate in, or if you just have questions, drop an e-mail to greatketch@...

Karen Smith,
Bill Kinney
SM Harmonie #160
Fort Lauderdale, FL


Patrick McAneny
 

Karen, I certainly want to replace my rub rail , having it produced and available in the US. without shipping from France ,would make it much cheaper and more available for boats located on this side of the pond , keep me posted .
Thanks,
Pat
SM Shenanigans


-----Original Message-----
From: Karen Smith via Groups.Io <karenharmonie@...>
To: main <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Sent: Tue, Mar 3, 2020 4:24 pm
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] More Options for Rub Rail Inserts

Hey group,
 
We have done a little digging into the possibility of US based production options for the rub rail inserts. Seems a good option instead of shipping relatively inexpensive, yet bulky and heavy material across the ocean.

Companies doing custom, short-run rubber extrusions are pretty common in the industry. We contacted a local manufacturer who specializes in things like rub rails for inflatable boats to see if they could produce the Amel rub rail insert in low quantity and at reasonable cost. 
 
The basic answer is, yes they can. They have seen a dimensioned drawing of the insert, and confirmed that they can make it without technical difficulty. It would be made of EDPM, the premier rubber formulation for UV exposure. Not sure about color yet.
 
There isn’t enough information yet to set a hard price, but it looks like the MAXIMUM cost would be $800 per boat, and it could be as little as half that, plus UPS domestic ground shipping.
 
The process would look like this:  If we get enough interest, I’ll trim a bit off my insert and give to the engineers so they can finalize the design of an extrusion die.  They then run off a prototype piece and I would test it for fit on my boat.  If all is good, a 50% deposit would hold a place in the production run.
 
If there is sufficient interest, we could have material in hand in 3 weeks.
 
At this point we have gone as far as we can go without having a read if there is enough interest in going further, so if this is something you’d want to participate in, or if you just have questions, drop an e-mail to greatketch@...

Karen Smith,
Bill Kinney
SM Harmonie #160
Fort Lauderdale, FL


Stephen Davis
 

Thanks Karen. Consider me interested, and let me know how things progress. 


Steve
Aloha SM 72
Hawaii


Karen Smith
 

Steve,

I am not (yet) sure about delivery time and cost to HI, but I know Seattle would work. At this point it looks like one or possibly two, boxes UPS ground for something less than $100.

Bill & Karen
SM Harmonie, #160
Fort Lauderdale, FL


Stephen Davis
 

Hi Karen,

Thanks for doing all the research on this. I’d be very interested in this purchase, but we are way out in Hawaii until the beginning of June when we head for Alaska. With that said, if the manufacturer was able to arrange shipping to Hawaii at a cost that wouldn’t break the bank, I would still be interested. Alternatively, if Hawaii would not work, I could pick it up from my sister in law in Seattle when we arrive there in September. Let me know if you think any of that could possible work. 


Thanks,
Steve and Liz Davis
Aloha SM 72
Hawaii