Sea Chest


Sv Garulfo
 

Hi Mark,

Thanks for the clarification. I can see how it would help keeping units downstream of the manifold primed. A54 (at least ours, but I believe all) have a check valve in front of the anchor wash pump, although it’s prone to clogging open and fail, like I described in post
Incidentally, it has failed again a few months after I had cleaned it, so I probably need to change it. The symptoms (squirting in the cockpit drain) reappeared and I resorted to grey tape the anchor wash outlet as a temporary measure, which stopped the squirting immediately. 

Having said that, your device doesn’t help purging out  air accumulated in the seachest through the thruhull, because of air bubbles or a deep roll while sailing. That accumulated air still needs to be evacuated through the raw water consumers. On the A54 the fridge circulation pump usually does that job. 


Best,
Thomas
GARULFO 
A54-122
Huahine, French Polynesia 


On 10 Apr 2021, at 01:53, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:

Mark,

That brass one-valve was not original. 

Best,

CW Bill Rouse 
Amel Owners Yacht School
+1 832-380-4970 | brouse@...
720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com 
Yacht School Calendar: www.preparetocastoff.blogspot.com/p/calendar.html


   

On Fri, Apr 9, 2021, 10:48 PM Mark Erdos <mcerdos@...> wrote:

I have a one-way flap valve between the manifold and the sea-chest/strainer. It is not possible for water to easily flow backward toward the sea-chest even if the engine or genset pulls water faster than the strainer can provide (if dirty). This ensures my pumps for AC, water makers and heads remain primed and I get no air in the sea-chest. The original was brass and I upgraded to stainless when I rebuilt the manifold.

 

Check valves - Check valves manufacturer - SIO

 

 

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of CW Bill Rouse
Sent: Friday, April 9, 2021 2:40 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io Notification
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Sea Chest

 

That would certainly suck air into the strainer because the suction from various pumps would overcome a one-way valve. All of the one-way valves I am familiar with for water do not work well for air.

 

I am not sure what Mark is talking about because the sea chest contains the strainer.

image.png

 

image.png

 

 

 

CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School

Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 

 

View My Training Calendar

 

 

On Fri, Apr 9, 2021 at 6:19 PM Sv Garulfo <svgarulfo@...> wrote:

hi Mark,

 

Can you expand on that idea? I don’t really see where that valve would be?

 

Bill, 

What do you think of a hose out of the Vetus lid, up over the water line and outputting in the cockpit drain (which is very nearby on the A54), with a one way valve to let accumulated air out into the cockpit drain but preventing any suction of air through there? 

Raw water consumers would pump sea water through the chest and strainer and any accumulated air (up to the waterline) would rejoin the atmosphere by simple gravity. 

Arguably, the rolling motion of the boat would continuously fill that one-way hose with sea water until it overflows in the drain. Also, removing the vetus lid for maintenance of he sea chest would be messier, having to deal with the water left in the hose. Maybe a Gardena type adapter to easily remove the hose from the lid even if it’s full. The same fitting could be used to feed the system fresh water for wintering like Arno did.

 

Any views ?

 

Thanks

 

Fair winds

 

Thomas

GARULFO 

A54-122

Huahine, French Polynesia 

 

 

 

On Sun, 29 Nov 2020 at 11:28, Mark Erdos <mcerdos@...> wrote:

The most effective way I have found to prevent air accumulation in the strainer it to install a one-way flow valve between the strainer and the sea-chest.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

www.creampuff.us

 

 


 

Mark,

That brass one-valve was not original. 

Best,

CW Bill Rouse 
Amel Owners Yacht School
+1 832-380-4970 | brouse@...
720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com 
Yacht School Calendar: www.preparetocastoff.blogspot.com/p/calendar.html


   


On Fri, Apr 9, 2021, 10:48 PM Mark Erdos <mcerdos@...> wrote:

I have a one-way flap valve between the manifold and the sea-chest/strainer. It is not possible for water to easily flow backward toward the sea-chest even if the engine or genset pulls water faster than the strainer can provide (if dirty). This ensures my pumps for AC, water makers and heads remain primed and I get no air in the sea-chest. The original was brass and I upgraded to stainless when I rebuilt the manifold.

 

 

 

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of CW Bill Rouse
Sent: Friday, April 9, 2021 2:40 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io Notification
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Sea Chest

 

That would certainly suck air into the strainer because the suction from various pumps would overcome a one-way valve. All of the one-way valves I am familiar with for water do not work well for air.

 

I am not sure what Mark is talking about because the sea chest contains the strainer.

 

 

 

 

CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School

Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 

 

View My Training Calendar

 

 

On Fri, Apr 9, 2021 at 6:19 PM Sv Garulfo <svgarulfo@...> wrote:

hi Mark,

 

Can you expand on that idea? I don’t really see where that valve would be?

 

Bill, 

What do you think of a hose out of the Vetus lid, up over the water line and outputting in the cockpit drain (which is very nearby on the A54), with a one way valve to let accumulated air out into the cockpit drain but preventing any suction of air through there? 

Raw water consumers would pump sea water through the chest and strainer and any accumulated air (up to the waterline) would rejoin the atmosphere by simple gravity. 

Arguably, the rolling motion of the boat would continuously fill that one-way hose with sea water until it overflows in the drain. Also, removing the vetus lid for maintenance of he sea chest would be messier, having to deal with the water left in the hose. Maybe a Gardena type adapter to easily remove the hose from the lid even if it’s full. The same fitting could be used to feed the system fresh water for wintering like Arno did.

 

Any views ?

 

Thanks

 

Fair winds

 

Thomas

GARULFO 

A54-122

Huahine, French Polynesia 

 

 

 

On Sun, 29 Nov 2020 at 11:28, Mark Erdos <mcerdos@...> wrote:

The most effective way I have found to prevent air accumulation in the strainer it to install a one-way flow valve between the strainer and the sea-chest.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

www.creampuff.us

 

 


Mark Erdos
 

I have a one-way flap valve between the manifold and the sea-chest/strainer. It is not possible for water to easily flow backward toward the sea-chest even if the engine or genset pulls water faster than the strainer can provide (if dirty). This ensures my pumps for AC, water makers and heads remain primed and I get no air in the sea-chest. The original was brass and I upgraded to stainless when I rebuilt the manifold.

 

Check valves - Check valves manufacturer - SIO

 

 

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of CW Bill Rouse
Sent: Friday, April 9, 2021 2:40 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io Notification
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Sea Chest

 

That would certainly suck air into the strainer because the suction from various pumps would overcome a one-way valve. All of the one-way valves I am familiar with for water do not work well for air.

 

I am not sure what Mark is talking about because the sea chest contains the strainer.

image.png

 

image.png

 

 

 

CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School

Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 

 

View My Training Calendar

 

 

On Fri, Apr 9, 2021 at 6:19 PM Sv Garulfo <svgarulfo@...> wrote:

hi Mark,

 

Can you expand on that idea? I don’t really see where that valve would be?

 

Bill, 

What do you think of a hose out of the Vetus lid, up over the water line and outputting in the cockpit drain (which is very nearby on the A54), with a one way valve to let accumulated air out into the cockpit drain but preventing any suction of air through there? 

Raw water consumers would pump sea water through the chest and strainer and any accumulated air (up to the waterline) would rejoin the atmosphere by simple gravity. 

Arguably, the rolling motion of the boat would continuously fill that one-way hose with sea water until it overflows in the drain. Also, removing the vetus lid for maintenance of he sea chest would be messier, having to deal with the water left in the hose. Maybe a Gardena type adapter to easily remove the hose from the lid even if it’s full. The same fitting could be used to feed the system fresh water for wintering like Arno did.

 

Any views ?

 

Thanks

 

Fair winds

 

Thomas

GARULFO 

A54-122

Huahine, French Polynesia 

 

 

 

On Sun, 29 Nov 2020 at 11:28, Mark Erdos <mcerdos@...> wrote:

The most effective way I have found to prevent air accumulation in the strainer it to install a one-way flow valve between the strainer and the sea-chest.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

www.creampuff.us

 

 


 

That would certainly suck air into the strainer because the suction from various pumps would overcome a one-way valve. All of the one-way valves I am familiar with for water do not work well for air.

I am not sure what Mark is talking about because the sea chest contains the strainer.
image.png

image.png



CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Fri, Apr 9, 2021 at 6:19 PM Sv Garulfo <svgarulfo@...> wrote:
hi Mark,

Can you expand on that idea? I don’t really see where that valve would be?

Bill, 
What do you think of a hose out of the Vetus lid, up over the water line and outputting in the cockpit drain (which is very nearby on the A54), with a one way valve to let accumulated air out into the cockpit drain but preventing any suction of air through there? 
Raw water consumers would pump sea water through the chest and strainer and any accumulated air (up to the waterline) would rejoin the atmosphere by simple gravity. 
Arguably, the rolling motion of the boat would continuously fill that one-way hose with sea water until it overflows in the drain. Also, removing the vetus lid for maintenance of he sea chest would be messier, having to deal with the water left in the hose. Maybe a Gardena type adapter to easily remove the hose from the lid even if it’s full. The same fitting could be used to feed the system fresh water for wintering like Arno did.

Any views ?

Thanks

Fair winds

Thomas
GARULFO 
A54-122
Huahine, French Polynesia 



On Sun, 29 Nov 2020 at 11:28, Mark Erdos <mcerdos@...> wrote:

The most effective way I have found to prevent air accumulation in the strainer it to install a one-way flow valve between the strainer and the sea-chest.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

www.creampuff.us

 

 


Sv Garulfo
 

hi Mark,

Can you expand on that idea? I don’t really see where that valve would be?

Bill, 
What do you think of a hose out of the Vetus lid, up over the water line and outputting in the cockpit drain (which is very nearby on the A54), with a one way valve to let accumulated air out into the cockpit drain but preventing any suction of air through there? 
Raw water consumers would pump sea water through the chest and strainer and any accumulated air (up to the waterline) would rejoin the atmosphere by simple gravity. 
Arguably, the rolling motion of the boat would continuously fill that one-way hose with sea water until it overflows in the drain. Also, removing the vetus lid for maintenance of he sea chest would be messier, having to deal with the water left in the hose. Maybe a Gardena type adapter to easily remove the hose from the lid even if it’s full. The same fitting could be used to feed the system fresh water for wintering like Arno did.

Any views ?

Thanks

Fair winds

Thomas
GARULFO 
A54-122
Huahine, French Polynesia 



On Sun, 29 Nov 2020 at 11:28, Mark Erdos <mcerdos@...> wrote:

The most effective way I have found to prevent air accumulation in the strainer it to install a one-way flow valve between the strainer and the sea-chest.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

www.creampuff.us

 

 


Mark Erdos
 

The most effective way I have found to prevent air accumulation in the strainer it to install a one-way flow valve between the strainer and the sea-chest.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

www.creampuff.us

 

 


Patrick McAneny
 

Bill, While sailing back from Bermuda on a starboard tack ,my gen set shut down several times,I found that there was no water in the strainer,taking off the cap allowed it to fill. What do you think about inserting a very small tube in the lid and run  it up under the cockpit floor ,maybe with a one way valve ,so that an air lock would not form. Just a thought.
Pat
SM #123


-----Original Message-----
From: Karen Smith via groups.io <karenharmonie@...>
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Sent: Fri, Nov 27, 2020 4:34 pm
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Sea Chest

Chris,

I have taken the photos and annotated them with the parts list.  

All of the fittings I used are standard NPT pipe fittings.  In the case of the outlet fitting on the strainer, that is actually a female 1-1/2” BSP thread.  In this size, the NPT and BSP threads are compatible enough that they will screw together just fine, but they will not make a reliable high pressure seal.  Don’t expect “teflon tape” to help here.  You’ll need paste type pipe sealant.  For the very low pressures seen here, it works fine despite the small mismatch in thread shapes..

We have been running this long enough now, we can confidently say that it works with no issues. Well, no issues that were not already there with the stock Amel manifold.

Here is the only problem we have with the “sea chest” design.  As we sail, air is entrained under the hull.  Some of this air finds the sea chest thruhull and rises into it, displacing the water.  If we are sailing fast, enough air comes through that in a very few hours the strainer and standpipe are empty of water. I am pretty confident that needing to purge this entrained air is the primary reason that the generators on Amel’s have such short lived raw water impellers.  I have a couple of ideas on how to improve this situation, but nothing ready to implement yet.

Our new generator has a hair trigger on its exhaust temperature shutdown which has made this problem more obvious.  Occasionally, and only when we are sailing, the high exhaust temp triggers a shut down right after it starts.  A second start try and it runs fine. If I crack the lid of the strainer and purge the air, it never happens. 

Short of closing the sea cock, I can’t think of a way to keep the air out, so I am trying to figure out a way to easily purge it.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA



Clive Chapman
 

Would an automatic vent from a central heating system help? Something like this: https://www.toolstation.com/reliance-automatic-air-vent-push-fit/p74735

Would need to find one that is seawater safe. 


Karen Smith
 

Matt, 

Obviously great minds think alike. That is the approach I am most seriously considering. The devil is in the details but I’m thinking it’s the right direction to go.

Bill Kinney
sm160, Harmonie
Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA


Matt Salatino
 

How about a vent hose that ends high in the engine room, close to deck level, centered in the boat? This would allow the water level to stay at outside sea level.

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Nov 27, 2020, at 10:21 PM, Karen Smith via groups.io <karenharmonie@...> wrote:

Mark,

That certainly addresses the problem of air in the seachest. Unfortunately, those of us with older SM models don't have that option since the washdown pump does not draw its water from the seachest.

Adding an "extra" pump just to suck out the air is one option, but seems to me a very inelegant one.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA


Karen Smith
 

Mark,

That certainly addresses the problem of air in the seachest. Unfortunately, those of us with older SM models don't have that option since the washdown pump does not draw its water from the seachest.

Adding an "extra" pump just to suck out the air is one option, but seems to me a very inelegant one.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA


Thomas Peacock
 

Thanks as always for the tips, Bill.

On the short life of the generator impeller, I have much experience, and a tiny bit of advice.

After we bought our boat about ten years ago, the generator would go through impellers every 15 or 20 hours, obviously a major pain.

When in Martinique, I had Didiere, the local, very experienced diesel mechanic, work on a separate issue. He always looked into the impeller problem, and put a new one in, using some sort of glue-type substance on the Woodruff key that keeps the impeller working correctly. The new impeller lasted only about three hours. (That said, I still think Didiere is a great mechanic).

For the next one, I did three things:

1. I also put a mild glue on the Woodruff key

2. I sanded the inner part of the impeller housing (perhaps the metal is more prone to accumulating residue from the rubber, which then leads to excessive friction)

3. I lubricated the inner housing with Molykote. 

Since, then, I have had no impeller problems, 

Might be coincidence, but it works for me.

Tom Peacock
SM 240 Aletes
Chesapeake Bay, awaiting vaccine


On Nov 27, 2020, at 4:34 PM, Karen Smith via groups.io <karenharmonie@...> wrote:

Chris,

I have taken the photos and annotated them with the parts list.  

All of the fittings I used are standard NPT pipe fittings.  In the case of the outlet fitting on the strainer, that is actually a female 1-1/2” BSP thread.  In this size, the NPT and BSP threads are compatible enough that they will screw together just fine, but they will not make a reliable high pressure seal.  Don’t expect “teflon tape” to help here.  You’ll need paste type pipe sealant.  For the very low pressures seen here, it works fine despite the small mismatch in thread shapes..

We have been running this long enough now, we can confidently say that it works with no issues. Well, no issues that were not already there with the stock Amel manifold.

Here is the only problem we have with the “sea chest” design.  As we sail, air is entrained under the hull.  Some of this air finds the sea chest thruhull and rises into it, displacing the water.  If we are sailing fast, enough air comes through that in a very few hours the strainer and standpipe are empty of water. I am pretty confident that needing to purge this entrained air is the primary reason that the generators on Amel’s have such short lived raw water impellers.  I have a couple of ideas on how to improve this situation, but nothing ready to implement yet.

Our new generator has a hair trigger on its exhaust temperature shutdown which has made this problem more obvious.  Occasionally, and only when we are sailing, the high exhaust temp triggers a shut down right after it starts.  A second start try and it runs fine. If I crack the lid of the strainer and purge the air, it never happens. 

Short of closing the sea cock, I can’t think of a way to keep the air out, so I am trying to figure out a way to easily purge it.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA


<9495D3AA-FC12-427B-AD1A-C082BAE84D49.jpeg><288A2531-8543-43CF-91FA-F8D6F4D69446.jpeg>


--
Tom Peacock
SM 240 Aletes
Chesapeake Bay


Mark Pitt
 

I always run the anchor washdown pump for 20 seconds, turn it off, and then immediately turn on the generator or Yanmar.  Haven’t lost an impeller since I started doing this a few years ago.

Mark Pitt
Sabbatical III, SM419


On Nov 27, 2020, at 3:34 PM, Karen Smith via groups.io <karenharmonie@...> wrote:

Chris,

I have taken the photos and annotated them with the parts list.  

All of the fittings I used are standard NPT pipe fittings.  In the case of the outlet fitting on the strainer, that is actually a female 1-1/2” BSP thread.  In this size, the NPT and BSP threads are compatible enough that they will screw together just fine, but they will not make a reliable high pressure seal.  Don’t expect “teflon tape” to help here.  You’ll need paste type pipe sealant.  For the very low pressures seen here, it works fine despite the small mismatch in thread shapes..

We have been running this long enough now, we can confidently say that it works with no issues. Well, no issues that were not already there with the stock Amel manifold.

Here is the only problem we have with the “sea chest” design.  As we sail, air is entrained under the hull.  Some of this air finds the sea chest thruhull and rises into it, displacing the water.  If we are sailing fast, enough air comes through that in a very few hours the strainer and standpipe are empty of water. I am pretty confident that needing to purge this entrained air is the primary reason that the generators on Amel’s have such short lived raw water impellers.  I have a couple of ideas on how to improve this situation, but nothing ready to implement yet.

Our new generator has a hair trigger on its exhaust temperature shutdown which has made this problem more obvious.  Occasionally, and only when we are sailing, the high exhaust temp triggers a shut down right after it starts.  A second start try and it runs fine. If I crack the lid of the strainer and purge the air, it never happens. 

Short of closing the sea cock, I can’t think of a way to keep the air out, so I am trying to figure out a way to easily purge it.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA


<9495D3AA-FC12-427B-AD1A-C082BAE84D49.jpeg>
<288A2531-8543-43CF-91FA-F8D6F4D69446.jpeg>


Karen Smith
 

Chris,

I have taken the photos and annotated them with the parts list.  

All of the fittings I used are standard NPT pipe fittings.  In the case of the outlet fitting on the strainer, that is actually a female 1-1/2” BSP thread.  In this size, the NPT and BSP threads are compatible enough that they will screw together just fine, but they will not make a reliable high pressure seal.  Don’t expect “teflon tape” to help here.  You’ll need paste type pipe sealant.  For the very low pressures seen here, it works fine despite the small mismatch in thread shapes..

We have been running this long enough now, we can confidently say that it works with no issues. Well, no issues that were not already there with the stock Amel manifold.

Here is the only problem we have with the “sea chest” design.  As we sail, air is entrained under the hull.  Some of this air finds the sea chest thruhull and rises into it, displacing the water.  If we are sailing fast, enough air comes through that in a very few hours the strainer and standpipe are empty of water. I am pretty confident that needing to purge this entrained air is the primary reason that the generators on Amel’s have such short lived raw water impellers.  I have a couple of ideas on how to improve this situation, but nothing ready to implement yet.

Our new generator has a hair trigger on its exhaust temperature shutdown which has made this problem more obvious.  Occasionally, and only when we are sailing, the high exhaust temp triggers a shut down right after it starts.  A second start try and it runs fine. If I crack the lid of the strainer and purge the air, it never happens. 

Short of closing the sea cock, I can’t think of a way to keep the air out, so I am trying to figure out a way to easily purge it.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA



Chris Doucette
 

Bill, 

I am looking at doing this same project. The elbow out of the sea strainer, what challenges did you encounter with it and what size Nipple did you get to fit into there.. If you also had a size / part breakdown of the two manifold sections you made it would be a fantastic time saver!

Chris


Thomas Kleman
 

Hey Bill- great pics of your tidy work with your sea chest. By hull #422 (our boat) Amel was installing a ball valve ahead of the 5 port manifold. You could be running the engine or genset and cut off raw water to the AC, anchor wash, heads, and watermaker (only as a group). I've been going back and forth on adding 5 ball valves as in 10 years of ownership and work on each pump using sea water, it's never been a huge need to isolate a port in this way. Maybe a bit less cleanup but no big deal.

On the material used for the manifold, obviously I'm looking for strength.. although anyone swinging a 5 lb hammer in the engine room is usually asked to leave....not sure how much weight I attach to bronze's fire retardant properties as when you look around the engine room at all the plastic (ie sea chest itself) and hosing it's hard to imagine a fire where your bronze fitting saved your boat. Maybe if your AC pump capacitor underneath it went Chernobyl ?

These posts are so incredibly valuable to me. Great to see people's approaches, problems, and choices......definitely copying some of yours. Thanks.

Thomas Kleman
SV L'ORIENT
SM2K 422
Oahu


Karen Smith
 

Must be an epidemic of manifold rebuilds!  We are in the process of redoing ours. While I LOVE the idea of a seachest, the original Amel implementation on our Super Maramu (#160) always bothered me a bit since there were no valves other than the main seacock.  The ability to isolate the individual circuits either in an emergency or for routine maintenance while in the water always seemed an oversight.

A crusty old sailor who has surely forgotten more about boats than I'll ever know had a strong opinion about raw water systems.  You should be able to hit it with a 5 pound sledge, or stand on it with your full weight, or hit it with a torch, and not worry about it ever breaking or leaking.  Feeling that was a pretty good approach, I have always looked askance on any raw water system made of PVC parts which tend to be brittle and fragile to external impact.  Marelon is strong and resilient. PVC--not so much.  Also, PVC is very susceptible to the heat of even a small fire.  Even if the fire gets extinguished, you could lose your boat from flooding due to melted plastic plumbing.  

We installed a system made of solid bronze pipe fittings. Certainly more expensive than plastic, but much, much stronger. You get what you pay for.

The engine is fed directly with a connection directly off the strainer, and a tee with a reenforced 1 1/4" hose carries water over to the "pump pad".





If you are changing your manifold, whatever material your chose, be sure that the piping runs DOWNHILL continuously to any centrifugal pump.  ANY place that air can get trapped will result in difficulty of the pumps priming.  I have always used check valves on the discharge of each AC pump since these centrifugal pumps offer no resistance to back flow and would allow air to be pulled back into the system. The engine, generator, and RO system are all positive displacement pumps (more or less!) that offer significant resistance to reverse flow and do not need separate check valves.

In most cases, I have found that 35mm and 1.25 inch hose and hose fittings are pretty much interchangeable.

Bill Kinney (and Karen Smith)
Annapolis, MD, USA
Harmonie, SM#160
http://fetchinketch.net


Mark Erdos
 

Porter,

 

Thanks for that very kind safety net offer.

 

I think I have this figured out. I am going to use a 1-1/2” hose barb and sand down the edges of the barb. I should then be able to warm the hose enough to get it over the fitting. We are only taking 3mm here so 1.5mm all around should do the trick.

 

I just place my order at McMaster for the entire assembly. Fingers crossed.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Porter McRoberts via groups.io
Sent: Monday, October 12, 2020 9:40 AM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Sea Chest

 

This is the kind of project I would not undertake unless within walking distance to a great chandlery ripe with plumbing options. My adventure down this rabbit hole was complicated even with one close. 

Mark if you get in a bind I have a extra stainless manifold. 

 

Porter

Porter McRoberts 

S/V IBIS A54-152, Moorea

WhatsApp:+1 754 265 2206

Www.fouribis.net



On Oct 12, 2020, at 9:18 AM, Doug Smith via groups.io <dugsmith98@...> wrote:

Could you take an appropriate sized plastic pipe fitting to a plumbing or machine shop and have them cut the threads into the plastic?

Thanks, Doug Smith

 

Amel 54-113, Aventura

Deltaville, VA USA

Dugsmith98@...



On Oct 12, 2020, at 2:09 PM, Mark Erdos <mcerdos@...> wrote:



I heard back from US Plastics. This fitting is not one they make. Also, not available from Banjo or McMaster.  I am at a complete loss for this fitting. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

 

 

Plastic 1¼” male pipe thread to a 35mm ( or, 1 3/8”)  hose barb

 

<image001.png>

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Mark Erdos via groups.io
Sent: Monday, October 12, 2020 6:00 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Sea Chest

 

Thanks Tom. I send them a note seems I can’t find it on their site.

 

I have also check the Banjo catalog and McMaster. Not much luck.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Thomas Kleman
Sent: Sunday, October 11, 2020 9:45 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Sea Chest

 

Mark- you might go with 1-3/8 for the 35mm side and try US Plastics. 


Porter McRoberts
 

This is the kind of project I would not undertake unless within walking distance to a great chandlery ripe with plumbing options. My adventure down this rabbit hole was complicated even with one close. 
Mark if you get in a bind I have a extra stainless manifold. 

Porter

Porter McRoberts 
S/V IBIS A54-152, Moorea
WhatsApp:+1 754 265 2206
Www.fouribis.net

On Oct 12, 2020, at 9:18 AM, Doug Smith via groups.io <dugsmith98@...> wrote:

Could you take an appropriate sized plastic pipe fitting to a plumbing or machine shop and have them cut the threads into the plastic?

Thanks, Doug Smith

Amel 54-113, Aventura
Deltaville, VA USA
Dugsmith98@...

On Oct 12, 2020, at 2:09 PM, Mark Erdos <mcerdos@...> wrote:



I heard back from US Plastics. This fitting is not one they make. Also, not available from Banjo or McMaster.  I am at a complete loss for this fitting. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

 

 

Plastic 1¼” male pipe thread to a 35mm ( or, 1 3/8”)  hose barb

 

<image001.png>

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Mark Erdos via groups.io
Sent: Monday, October 12, 2020 6:00 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Sea Chest

 

Thanks Tom. I send them a note seems I can’t find it on their site.

 

I have also check the Banjo catalog and McMaster. Not much luck.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Thomas Kleman
Sent: Sunday, October 11, 2020 9:45 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Sea Chest

 

Mark- you might go with 1-3/8 for the 35mm side and try US Plastics. 


Doug Smith
 

Could you take an appropriate sized plastic pipe fitting to a plumbing or machine shop and have them cut the threads into the plastic?

Thanks, Doug Smith

Amel 54-113, Aventura
Deltaville, VA USA
Dugsmith98@...

On Oct 12, 2020, at 2:09 PM, Mark Erdos <mcerdos@...> wrote:



I heard back from US Plastics. This fitting is not one they make. Also, not available from Banjo or McMaster.  I am at a complete loss for this fitting. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

 

 

Plastic 1¼” male pipe thread to a 35mm ( or, 1 3/8”)  hose barb

 

<image001.png>

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Mark Erdos via groups.io
Sent: Monday, October 12, 2020 6:00 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Sea Chest

 

Thanks Tom. I send them a note seems I can’t find it on their site.

 

I have also check the Banjo catalog and McMaster. Not much luck.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Thomas Kleman
Sent: Sunday, October 11, 2020 9:45 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Sea Chest

 

Mark- you might go with 1-3/8 for the 35mm side and try US Plastics.