Genua Furler on Santorin...stay electrical or go mechanical


Volker Hasenauer <volker.hasenauer@...>
 

Hello Santorin or Maramu Owners,

I own a Santorin (SN 27) from 1990 which I am planning to overhaul. I bought the boat about a year ago, however due to Covid I was so far not able to do anything with her. The Genua furler is original (fully functional) but I wonder if its a worthwhile project going "backwards" and install a conventional furler instead to renew the entire electrical furler. I did not checked so far the price with Amel for a new electrical furler. My best guess is however that a conventional one may be far cheaper?

Does anyone have experience with such a conversion? I am a bit afraid that I mess with the entire design philosophy of Amel....??? 

I would be grateful for any ideas....pro & con's

Volker
Aquamarine (Santorin # 27), currently in Malaysia

 


Ian Park
 
Edited

Volker
Does the electric curled work at the moment. 
If 'Yes', then do not change it. Use it for a while before deciding.
The original Genoa is pretty big - 150% and weighs a fair bit. It can be hauled in by manual curling and you can experience this by using the built in manual furler.
The Bosch motor is no longer made, but replacing brushes and springs is still possible.  the gearbox is very well engineered and should last a lifetime if it has been kept properly lubricated.
A final question is - how long will you keep your Santorin? I don't think you would sell it again if you remove all the electric curling systems!
I also think it will cost you more to change the systems than to service them.
Leave well alone until you've sailed it for at least one season. I'll get anything you will decide that the design is excellent!

Ian 'Ocean Hobo' Santorin no.96


Volker <volker.hasenauer@...>
 

Hi Ian,

thanks for your thoughts!

So far all works....I am only concerned about the age of the gearbox/motor. I already changed the main furler motors & gearboxes as they were non function...

Forced by Covid not to do much I just sit and dream about what needs to be done once she is in my reach and under my daily care. Being in Malaysia means under the "new normal" that shipping gets crazy expensive and takes ages to reach us - that's why I try to evaluate what I could order now and have it available when the boat is around the corner.

Answering your question on how long I will keep her, well I just bought a year ago and if I could really get hold of her - she is within Malaysia but due to travel restriction I am not able to pick her up - I have no serious plans of selling her. I like the layout, I like the little details of that boat. She is ideal for me and my wife and we wish to take her long term cruising. 

Thanks again and wishing you Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year,

Volker
Aquamarine, Santorin # 27


On Thu, Dec 24, 2020 at 4:54 PM Ian Park <parkianj@...> wrote:

[Edited Message Follows]

Volker
Does the electric curled work at the moment. 
If 'Yes', then do not change it. Use it for a while before deciding.
The original Genoa is pretty big - 150% and weighs a fair bit. It can be hauled in by manual curling and you can experience this by using the built in manual furler.
The Bosch motor is no longer made, but replacing brushes and springs is still possible.  the gearbox is very well engineered and should last a lifetime if it has been kept properly lubricated.
A final question is - how long will you keep your Santorin? I don't think you would sell it again if you remove all the electric curling systems!
I also think it will cost you more to change the systems than to service them.
Leave well alone until you've sailed it for at least one season. I'll get anything you will decide that the design is excellent!

Ian 'Ocean Hobo' Santorin no.96


Craig Briggs
 

Hi Volker,
I totally agree with Ian's comments. That your genoa furler works well (unlike your main & outhaul) is great. My only recommendation would be to do some preventive maintenance on it and replace the seals so you do not risk any sea water intrusion. That's a bit of a job because you have to remove the unit, but you can also pull the headstay and regrease that while you're at it.  
The motor can easily be removed at a later time for periodic preventive maintenance. 
I would fully expect your furler to last many more years.
--
Craig, SN68 Sangaris, Tropic Isle Harbor, FL


James Alton
 

Volker,

   We own a Maramu that has the original electric furling systems for the main and Genoa, all of which were functional when we bought the boat. These have proven to be quite reliable and are powerful.    Having observed and  also experienced  boats with the many trip lines needed to control the sails manually, along with the drag of the many blocks in the system, the piles of line in the cockpit  we decided conclusively to retain the original Amel  furling system.  Yes, the electric systems do require some maintenance and  having a custom part made since some parts are N/A but I think having fingertip control of the sails from the cockpit on a short handed boat is invaluable and one of the reasons to own an Amel.  

James
SV Sueno
Maramu #220


-----Original Message-----
From: Volker Hasenauer <volker.hasenauer@...>
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Sent: Thu, Dec 24, 2020 3:21 am
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Genua Furler on Santorin...stay electrical or go mechanical

Hello Santorin or Maramu Owners,

I own a Santorin (SN 27) from 1990 which I am planning to overhaul. I bought the boat about a year ago, however due to Covid I was so far not able to do anything with her. The Genua furler is original (fully functional) but I wonder if its a worthwhile project going "backwards" and install a conventional furler instead to renew the entire electrical furler. I did not checked so far the price with Amel for a new electrical furler. My best guess is however that a conventional one may be far cheaper?

Does anyone have experience with such a conversion? I am a bit afraid that I mess with the entire design philosophy of Amel....??? 

I would be grateful for any ideas....pro & con's

Volker
Aquamarine (Santorin # 27), currently in Malaysia

 


Germain Jean-Pierre
 

Hello Volker,

For their present generation of boats, Amel uses Facnor curlers. But as mentioned repeatedly, your unit is rugged and well designed. But like everything else on a boat, it requires some maintenance. 

Merry Christmas 

Jean-Pierre Germain, Eleuthera, SM007, NZ


On 25/12/2020, at 5:09 AM, James Alton via groups.io <lokiyawl2@...> wrote:


Volker,

   We own a Maramu that has the original electric furling systems for the main and Genoa, all of which were functional when we bought the boat. These have proven to be quite reliable and are powerful.    Having observed and  also experienced  boats with the many trip lines needed to control the sails manually, along with the drag of the many blocks in the system, the piles of line in the cockpit  we decided conclusively to retain the original Amel  furling system.  Yes, the electric systems do require some maintenance and  having a custom part made since some parts are N/A but I think having fingertip control of the sails from the cockpit on a short handed boat is invaluable and one of the reasons to own an Amel.  

James
SV Sueno
Maramu #220


-----Original Message-----
From: Volker Hasenauer <volker.hasenauer@...>
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Sent: Thu, Dec 24, 2020 3:21 am
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Genua Furler on Santorin...stay electrical or go mechanical

Hello Santorin or Maramu Owners,

I own a Santorin (SN 27) from 1990 which I am planning to overhaul. I bought the boat about a year ago, however due to Covid I was so far not able to do anything with her. The Genua furler is original (fully functional) but I wonder if its a worthwhile project going "backwards" and install a conventional furler instead to renew the entire electrical furler. I did not checked so far the price with Amel for a new electrical furler. My best guess is however that a conventional one may be far cheaper?

Does anyone have experience with such a conversion? I am a bit afraid that I mess with the entire design philosophy of Amel....??? 

I would be grateful for any ideas....pro & con's

Volker
Aquamarine (Santorin # 27), currently in Malaysia

 


Ian Park
 

Volker, 
A bit more. Championship gearboxes are available and relatively not expensive. Their motors are a straightforward rebuild by a good motor electrics specialist.
There are a number of parts on the Santorin that are the same as the bigger and heavier Super Maramu. The C drive is one and I'm pretty sure the curled gearbox is another. Therefore they are well over engineered for the smaller Santorin and should last and last.

There's nothing like your first sudden tropical squall to make you appreciate the Santorin's curling system!

Merry Christmas

Ian 
Ocean Hobo SN96


JOHN HAYES
 

Hi Volker

So my santorin Nga Waka is a year younger launched in 1991 but it had sailed to nz from the med.....and it sat unused in Panama for a couple of years and on arrival in nz

I did a couple of cruises around NZ and some shorter transits in gales cause I wanted to see what bits of the boat might fail when stressed

First to fail were the gear boxes on the main mast. Both replaced with bonfiglioli gear boxes identical to those originally fitted. They were about Nz$300 each

The Genoa furler gear box also failed a couple of months later. It has a circular gear driven by a worm drive. I found a highly skilled gear maker (who had never seen a fibreglass gear box). He made new parts and assured me they would last another 30 years. Cost was about nz$2500 

The 12 volt motors that drive the furlers have been fully overhauled by specialists each costing about $1000. 

Since this work was done I’ve sailed through the pacific and down to the sub Antarctic islands. The Amel systems are brilliant to use and in my experience,  properly maintained, very reliable 

We did experience difficulty furling the main sail inside the mast when it would jam. That problem disappeared with a new sail

The other difficulty we had was the Perkins main engine. It was reliable but the cooling fresh water system was driven by a spline on top of the engine that slotted in to the back of the water pump. I did not know about a special realigning tool which is critical to reassembly ...... that cost me a couple of water pumps until I figured the problem. Later to ensure reliability I replaced the Perkins with a Volvo d250 Which is identical to the Perkins but has improved systems and less bits like water circulating systems hanging off it

I could go on but if you have any issues email me direct rather than clogging up everyone’s in boxes

Seasons greetings 

Johnhayes862@...

Wellington NZ








On 25/12/2020, at 9:34 PM, Ian Park <parkianj@...> wrote:

Volker, 
A bit more. Championship gearboxes are available and relatively not expensive. Their motors are a straightforward rebuild by a good motor electrics specialist.
There are a number of parts on the Santorin that are the same as the bigger and heavier Super Maramu. The C drive is one and I'm pretty sure the curled gearbox is another. Therefore they are well over engineered for the smaller Santorin and should last and last.

There's nothing like your first sudden tropical squall to make you appreciate the Santorin's curling system!

Merry Christmas

Ian 
Ocean Hobo SN96


Ian Park
 

Would it be a good idea for all SN owners to start any post or photo title with 'Santorin' followed by an easily searchable sub title - steering/engine/mast etc.
I find I am trawling through lots of posts that are not always applicable to the Santorin?
Just a thought..

Ian
Ocean Hobo SN96