Yanmar no start.


Dan Carlson
 

Hello Yanmar diesel gurus.

Our Yanmar 4Jh3-HTE has never missed a beat, until today.

Engine started fine and operated for 30-40 mins to lift anchor exit anchorage and get underway. Mostly at 1200-1500rpm.  Normal shutdown, with a short rev to approx 2500rmp before return to idle for a minute or two then shutdown.  Temp and oil pressure all normal.

After approx 1 hr sail to next anchorage engine started fine and operated at approx 1500 rpm for 15 minutes into anchorage then idling while anchoring for approx 5 mins, 1200-1300rpm to back down anchor, then after a short idle another rev to approx 2800 rpm then return to idle. When the engine rpms returned to idle the engine just stopped.  After thinking through everything that just happened I attempted to restart the engine and it did not catch after approx 3-5 seconds of cranking.  

We had lunch and allowed the engine to cool for a little over an hour. I checked coolent level, oil level, fuel in racor, looked over the engine and then attempted to start with no luck.  Next I pumped the fuel priming pump on top of the filter a few times but I did not bleed any fuel out.  I attempted to start two more times with approximately 5 seconds of cranking each time with no success. No indication of any firing. 

Finally: I drained about 1/4 cup of clean fuel from the bottom of the fuel filter, then loosened the fuel bleed valve and pumped some more fuel out of the bleed valve. It did not appear that there was any noticable air in the system.  Cleaned up and retried with Lori cranking for 5 seconds while I pumped the priming pump. No success.

Fuel tank has over 500 liters.

I thought I'd  check in with other Amel owners to get inputs on the next steps for troubleshooting. 

Advice appreciated.

Thanks and regards, Daniel Carlson on sv BeBe, SM #387


 

My 8 Ball Crystal Ball says, "Check Back Later"😀

I wonder if the fuel flow stop solenoid or the stop button is not working and cutting off fuel?


image.png

CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Wed, Feb 3, 2021 at 1:03 PM Dan Carlson <carlsdan61@...> wrote:
Hello Yanmar diesel gurus.

Our Yanmar 4Jh3-HTE has never missed a beat, until today.

Engine started fine and operated for 30-40 mins to lift anchor exit anchorage and get underway. Mostly at 1200-1500rpm.  Normal shutdown, with a short rev to approx 2500rmp before return to idle for a minute or two then shutdown.  Temp and oil pressure all normal.

After approx 1 hr sail to next anchorage engine started fine and operated at approx 1500 rpm for 15 minutes into anchorage then idling while anchoring for approx 5 mins, 1200-1300rpm to back down anchor, then after a short idle another rev to approx 2800 rpm then return to idle. When the engine rpms returned to idle the engine just stopped.  After thinking through everything that just happened I attempted to restart the engine and it did not catch after approx 3-5 seconds of cranking.  

We had lunch and allowed the engine to cool for a little over an hour. I checked coolent level, oil level, fuel in racor, looked over the engine and then attempted to start with no luck.  Next I pumped the fuel priming pump on top of the filter a few times but I did not bleed any fuel out.  I attempted to start two more times with approximately 5 seconds of cranking each time with no success. No indication of any firing. 

Finally: I drained about 1/4 cup of clean fuel from the bottom of the fuel filter, then loosened the fuel bleed valve and pumped some more fuel out of the bleed valve. It did not appear that there was any noticable air in the system.  Cleaned up and retried with Lori cranking for 5 seconds while I pumped the priming pump. No success.

Fuel tank has over 500 liters.

I thought I'd  check in with other Amel owners to get inputs on the next steps for troubleshooting. 

Advice appreciated.

Thanks and regards, Daniel Carlson on sv BeBe, SM #387


Stephen Davis
 

Hi Dan,

sorry about the starting issues, as I know how frustrating it can be. On a non electronically controlled engine like yours, it is most likely a fuel issue. If your fuel is clean, and no air in the system, how about a bad fuel pump. I have a newer Yanmar with an ECM, and have a fuel pump on mine, and assume you do as well. Can you crack the injectors, and have someone turn the engine over with the throttle full open, while you monitor to see that you have good fuel flow? This is a bit messy, so have some rags around the injectors to catch the fuel. 


Good luck!

Steve Davis
Aloha SM 72
Port Townsend, WA


Dan Carlson
 

Thanks for the tips Bill and Steve,

I tried to trouble shoot the solenoid by having Lori actuate the stop button on the console while I monitored for the clicking down at the engine.  That sounded normal. I tried to start and again it cranked but did not catch.  But it sounded like it was just getting some combustion at the end, so one more try and it slowly caught and when I gave it some slight throttle in neutral it picked up. I ran it for 15  minutes at 1700 rpm to get to temperature. It had a little bit of load from the alternator, charging the Li batteries. After it reached temp I switched the alternator regulator to "float"/ no load, ran the rpms slowly up to 2500 and back down to 1000 rpm. After a minute there I put the throttle back to the idle position and the rpms decreased to about 500 and then the engine stopped. So it seems like I have a low rpm idle setting or fuel flow issue at idle. I think I can adjust the idle up slightly, but that doesn't account for the change in performance of the engine, both the unexpected stopping as well as the difficult starting. (I've never had to apply any throttle when starting in the past.)

Steve, I'm not sure if I can test that small of a change in the fuel pump performance on the boat. 

Also, the fuel injectors were rebuilt and the valves adjusted a a little less than two hundred hours ago. 

Does that trigger any more ideas? 

Thanks and regards, Daniel Carlson on sv BeBe, SM #387.


On Wed, Feb 3, 2021, 4:23 PM CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:
My 8 Ball Crystal Ball says, "Check Back Later"😀

I wonder if the fuel flow stop solenoid or the stop button is not working and cutting off fuel?


image.png

CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Wed, Feb 3, 2021 at 1:03 PM Dan Carlson <carlsdan61@...> wrote:
Hello Yanmar diesel gurus.

Our Yanmar 4Jh3-HTE has never missed a beat, until today.

Engine started fine and operated for 30-40 mins to lift anchor exit anchorage and get underway. Mostly at 1200-1500rpm.  Normal shutdown, with a short rev to approx 2500rmp before return to idle for a minute or two then shutdown.  Temp and oil pressure all normal.

After approx 1 hr sail to next anchorage engine started fine and operated at approx 1500 rpm for 15 minutes into anchorage then idling while anchoring for approx 5 mins, 1200-1300rpm to back down anchor, then after a short idle another rev to approx 2800 rpm then return to idle. When the engine rpms returned to idle the engine just stopped.  After thinking through everything that just happened I attempted to restart the engine and it did not catch after approx 3-5 seconds of cranking.  

We had lunch and allowed the engine to cool for a little over an hour. I checked coolent level, oil level, fuel in racor, looked over the engine and then attempted to start with no luck.  Next I pumped the fuel priming pump on top of the filter a few times but I did not bleed any fuel out.  I attempted to start two more times with approximately 5 seconds of cranking each time with no success. No indication of any firing. 

Finally: I drained about 1/4 cup of clean fuel from the bottom of the fuel filter, then loosened the fuel bleed valve and pumped some more fuel out of the bleed valve. It did not appear that there was any noticable air in the system.  Cleaned up and retried with Lori cranking for 5 seconds while I pumped the priming pump. No success.

Fuel tank has over 500 liters.

I thought I'd  check in with other Amel owners to get inputs on the next steps for troubleshooting. 

Advice appreciated.

Thanks and regards, Daniel Carlson on sv BeBe, SM #387


Mark Erdos
 

Dan,

 

This sounds very typical of a stuck stop solenoid.

 

To check. Have someone at the helm push the stop button while you can observe the solenoid and lever on the engine. You should see the stop lever move as the solenoid is activated by the stop button at the panel.

 

To all: if you do not already have this in place it is a good idea to attached a red string (and red handle) for use as a manual stop.

 

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dan Carlson
Sent: Wednesday, February 3, 2021 9:03 AM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Yanmar no start.

 

Hello Yanmar diesel gurus.

 

Our Yanmar 4Jh3-HTE has never missed a beat, until today.

 

Engine started fine and operated for 30-40 mins to lift anchor exit anchorage and get underway. Mostly at 1200-1500rpm.  Normal shutdown, with a short rev to approx 2500rmp before return to idle for a minute or two then shutdown.  Temp and oil pressure all normal.

 

After approx 1 hr sail to next anchorage engine started fine and operated at approx 1500 rpm for 15 minutes into anchorage then idling while anchoring for approx 5 mins, 1200-1300rpm to back down anchor, then after a short idle another rev to approx 2800 rpm then return to idle. When the engine rpms returned to idle the engine just stopped.  After thinking through everything that just happened I attempted to restart the engine and it did not catch after approx 3-5 seconds of cranking.  

 

We had lunch and allowed the engine to cool for a little over an hour. I checked coolent level, oil level, fuel in racor, looked over the engine and then attempted to start with no luck.  Next I pumped the fuel priming pump on top of the filter a few times but I did not bleed any fuel out.  I attempted to start two more times with approximately 5 seconds of cranking each time with no success. No indication of any firing. 

 

Finally: I drained about 1/4 cup of clean fuel from the bottom of the fuel filter, then loosened the fuel bleed valve and pumped some more fuel out of the bleed valve. It did not appear that there was any noticable air in the system.  Cleaned up and retried with Lori cranking for 5 seconds while I pumped the priming pump. No success.

 

Fuel tank has over 500 liters.

 

I thought I'd  check in with other Amel owners to get inputs on the next steps for troubleshooting. 

 

Advice appreciated.

 

Thanks and regards, Daniel Carlson on sv BeBe, SM #387

 


Mark Erdos
 

Dan,

 

Sounds like you have it narrowed to a fuel issue.

 

Check your diesel fuel tank air vent to ensure it is not clogged or obstructed.

 

Does the start/generator run okay with no load?

 

Do you have duel racor filters? If so, is there a vacuum when the engine is running? And, have you tried switching to the alternate filter?

Image result for dual racor filters

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dan Carlson
Sent: Wednesday, February 3, 2021 11:34 AM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Yanmar no start.

 

Thanks for the tips Bill and Steve,

 

I tried to trouble shoot the solenoid by having Lori actuate the stop button on the console while I monitored for the clicking down at the engine.  That sounded normal. I tried to start and again it cranked but did not catch.  But it sounded like it was just getting some combustion at the end, so one more try and it slowly caught and when I gave it some slight throttle in neutral it picked up. I ran it for 15  minutes at 1700 rpm to get to temperature. It had a little bit of load from the alternator, charging the Li batteries. After it reached temp I switched the alternator regulator to "float"/ no load, ran the rpms slowly up to 2500 and back down to 1000 rpm. After a minute there I put the throttle back to the idle position and the rpms decreased to about 500 and then the engine stopped. So it seems like I have a low rpm idle setting or fuel flow issue at idle. I think I can adjust the idle up slightly, but that doesn't account for the change in performance of the engine, both the unexpected stopping as well as the difficult starting. (I've never had to apply any throttle when starting in the past.)

 

Steve, I'm not sure if I can test that small of a change in the fuel pump performance on the boat. 

 

Also, the fuel injectors were rebuilt and the valves adjusted a a little less than two hundred hours ago. 

 

Does that trigger any more ideas? 

 

Thanks and regards, Daniel Carlson on sv BeBe, SM #387.

 

 

On Wed, Feb 3, 2021, 4:23 PM CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:

My 8 Ball Crystal Ball says, "Check Back Later"😀

 

I wonder if the fuel flow stop solenoid or the stop button is not working and cutting off fuel?

 

 

image.png

 

CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School

Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 

 

View My Training Calendar

 

 

On Wed, Feb 3, 2021 at 1:03 PM Dan Carlson <carlsdan61@...> wrote:

Hello Yanmar diesel gurus.

 

Our Yanmar 4Jh3-HTE has never missed a beat, until today.

 

Engine started fine and operated for 30-40 mins to lift anchor exit anchorage and get underway. Mostly at 1200-1500rpm.  Normal shutdown, with a short rev to approx 2500rmp before return to idle for a minute or two then shutdown.  Temp and oil pressure all normal.

 

After approx 1 hr sail to next anchorage engine started fine and operated at approx 1500 rpm for 15 minutes into anchorage then idling while anchoring for approx 5 mins, 1200-1300rpm to back down anchor, then after a short idle another rev to approx 2800 rpm then return to idle. When the engine rpms returned to idle the engine just stopped.  After thinking through everything that just happened I attempted to restart the engine and it did not catch after approx 3-5 seconds of cranking.  

 

We had lunch and allowed the engine to cool for a little over an hour. I checked coolent level, oil level, fuel in racor, looked over the engine and then attempted to start with no luck.  Next I pumped the fuel priming pump on top of the filter a few times but I did not bleed any fuel out.  I attempted to start two more times with approximately 5 seconds of cranking each time with no success. No indication of any firing. 

 

Finally: I drained about 1/4 cup of clean fuel from the bottom of the fuel filter, then loosened the fuel bleed valve and pumped some more fuel out of the bleed valve. It did not appear that there was any noticable air in the system.  Cleaned up and retried with Lori cranking for 5 seconds while I pumped the priming pump. No success.

 

Fuel tank has over 500 liters.

 

I thought I'd  check in with other Amel owners to get inputs on the next steps for troubleshooting. 

 

Advice appreciated.

 

Thanks and regards, Daniel Carlson on sv BeBe, SM #387

 


Alan Leslie
 

Could it be water in the fuel?
I had a similar issue on a previous boat....would run but wouldn't idle.
The cause was a small amount of water in the fuel because I had left the boat in Fiji over the cyclone season and the #2 fuel tank was empty.
The condensation from the high ambient humidity contaminated the fuel when I filled it. 
Solution was to empty the tank, clean it, refill, bleed the fuel line and injector pump and presto, all go again.
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Thomas Kleman
 

Dan- does the genset run normally or not ?

Obviously this tells you a lot about the location of the problem.

Assuming the genset runs normally, I would check every fuel line connection from the tank to the injection pump (they can come loose).

If the genset doesn't run normally you might have bad fuel or Eric friedman's problem with the mesh filter inside the tank. He fixed it with compressed air.

Hope it's not the yanmar fuel pump.

Tom and Kirstin
SV L'ORIENT
SM2K 422


 

Hallo Daniel 
There are so many possible causes:
Here just some ideas to consider:
Did you Check the Air Filter? May be your Machine does Not get enough Air?

And, when it is running, what is the Color of the smoke/exhaust like?
More White than normal, and too less water circulation impeller Not okay,   
More Black than normal, the bearings ?/dichtungen, valves are Not tight
More blue than normal: Maybe the turbo charger is not tight or dirty?

Or, you got Bad Gasolina? Maybe diesel bacterias? There are cleaning products From liqui moly

Or, just as a last try before it does not Start : spray a Bit of Start Pilot into the carburator, but not too often, it may damage the machine.   

 Best wishes.
Goetz
SM #200 (PARSIFAL, actually in canarias) and succes.    


Holen Sie sich Outlook für Android



Von: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> im Auftrag von Dan Carlson <carlsdan61@...>
Gesendet: Mittwoch, 3. Februar 2021, 21:37
An: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Betreff: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Yanmar no start.

Thanks for the tips Bill and Steve,

I tried to trouble shoot the solenoid by having Lori actuate the stop button on the console while I monitored for the clicking down at the engine.  That sounded normal. I tried to start and again it cranked but did not catch.  But it sounded like it was just getting some combustion at the end, so one more try and it slowly caught and when I gave it some slight throttle in neutral it picked up. I ran it for 15  minutes at 1700 rpm to get to temperature. It had a little bit of load from the alternator, charging the Li batteries. After it reached temp I switched the alternator regulator to "float"/ no load, ran the rpms slowly up to 2500 and back down to 1000 rpm. After a minute there I put the throttle back to the idle position and the rpms decreased to about 500 and then the engine stopped. So it seems like I have a low rpm idle setting or fuel flow issue at idle. I think I can adjust the idle up slightly, but that doesn't account for the change in performance of the engine, both the unexpected stopping as well as the difficult starting. (I've never had to apply any throttle when starting in the past.)

Steve, I'm not sure if I can test that small of a change in the fuel pump performance on the boat. 

Also, the fuel injectors were rebuilt and the valves adjusted a a little less than two hundred hours ago. 

Does that trigger any more ideas? 

Thanks and regards, Daniel Carlson on sv BeBe, SM #387.


On Wed, Feb 3, 2021, 4:23 PM CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:
My 8 Ball Crystal Ball says, "Check Back Later"😀

I wonder if the fuel flow stop solenoid or the stop button is not working and cutting off fuel?


image.png

CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Wed, Feb 3, 2021 at 1:03 PM Dan Carlson <carlsdan61@...> wrote:
Hello Yanmar diesel gurus.

Our Yanmar 4Jh3-HTE has never missed a beat, until today.

Engine started fine and operated for 30-40 mins to lift anchor exit anchorage and get underway. Mostly at 1200-1500rpm.  Normal shutdown, with a short rev to approx 2500rmp before return to idle for a minute or two then shutdown.  Temp and oil pressure all normal.

After approx 1 hr sail to next anchorage engine started fine and operated at approx 1500 rpm for 15 minutes into anchorage then idling while anchoring for approx 5 mins, 1200-1300rpm to back down anchor, then after a short idle another rev to approx 2800 rpm then return to idle. When the engine rpms returned to idle the engine just stopped.  After thinking through everything that just happened I attempted to restart the engine and it did not catch after approx 3-5 seconds of cranking.  

We had lunch and allowed the engine to cool for a little over an hour. I checked coolent level, oil level, fuel in racor, looked over the engine and then attempted to start with no luck.  Next I pumped the fuel priming pump on top of the filter a few times but I did not bleed any fuel out.  I attempted to start two more times with approximately 5 seconds of cranking each time with no success. No indication of any firing. 

Finally: I drained about 1/4 cup of clean fuel from the bottom of the fuel filter, then loosened the fuel bleed valve and pumped some more fuel out of the bleed valve. It did not appear that there was any noticable air in the system.  Cleaned up and retried with Lori cranking for 5 seconds while I pumped the priming pump. No success.

Fuel tank has over 500 liters.

I thought I'd  check in with other Amel owners to get inputs on the next steps for troubleshooting. 

Advice appreciated.

Thanks and regards, Daniel Carlson on sv BeBe, SM #387



Karen Smith
 

Daniel,

I don't have any amazing magic things to add to what others have said, but I would STRONGLY discourage you from fiddling with the idle speed adjustment on the injection pump.  The inability to run stably at normal idle speed is a symptom, not the first cause of a failure.

This is not like the mixture adjustment on your outboard carburetor. It does not control the fuel flow itself, rather it controls the set point of a speed governor than then in turn adjusts the fuel rack.  Adjusting the idle speed adjustment is not typically done as part of a repair, but is part of the set up of the injection pump.

If you can get the engine running at a stable speed (slower is easier for this test) it might be worth opening the nut on the injectors, one at a time.  When disconnected, each injector should have a similar effect on the speed/smoothness of operation.  If one has little or no effect, then that injector is likely bad or clogged.

Another trick that can help sort out things, put a piece of clear plastic tubing into the system just before the lift pump.  If you see bubbles flowing by when running then you know you have an air leak that needs fixing.  If you see only clear fuel flow, then you can check off everything upstream of this as OK.  With your fuel tank nearly full, I doubt this is the problem, but it helps to be sure.

Last thing, I might have missed this, but if not yet done, changing the secondary fuel filter on the engine would be a good idea.  Again, not a likely, but a possible, cause of this kind of problem. For this filter, I would recommend (if possible) using a Yanmar OEM filter.  Some of the aftermarket filters have smaller elements and add excess restriction to fuel flow, especially after then get a bit of dirt in them. Normally problems with this filter are seen at high speed, not idle, but you have checked most all the easy boxes, so the less likely ones are what is left.

Tracking down fuel system issues like this can be a pain, but it will work out.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Charleston, SC


Dan Carlson
 

Thanks all for the helpful tips which also provides great emotional support :-) Nothing like a hick-up with your main engine out at anchor to get a little anxiety up.

All appears good now.

I changed both racor filters which had both been used since last changed. The in-use racor had noticably more dirt on it.  I also changed the fuel filters on both the Yanmar and Onan as they were right at a year since last change and the Yanmar had over 400 hrs due to above normal use on the long haul from the Caribbean to Chesapeake Bay in May and back after hurricane season this November. 

Both engines started and ran fine. 

I can suspect that a lot of extra motoring/motor-sailing, often when beating to the windward could have contributed to added gunk load on the fuel filters.  Also, in the last couple months we have had six rollicking reaches back and forth between Antigua and Barbuda with only about 200 liters sloshing around in the fuel tank. They were all sailing except the final 45 min to an hour using stirred up fuel to get into the anchorage. And the we just refueled last week as well, immediately motor-sailing for over a hour around to our anchorage.  Plenty of reasons to stir up the tank and add load to the fuel filters.

A few additional points:
- there were no issues with the Onan (but now with the LiFePo batteries it only had 100 hours over the last year and I'm sure that will go down more with my added solar capacity)
- no signs of water in the Racor bowls, or fuel drained from either the Yanmar or Onan fuel filters. 
- Fuel filters are Racor, Yanmar and Onan OEM parts.
- last month when I was down to about 180 liters in the tank, I opened the rear tank inspection port and could clearly see to the bottom of the tank and it was clean stainless steel. Could still be a little gunk in the corners or far forward. 
- I have been using Howes fuel treatment the last due refuelings, as well as a Valvetech biocide since Cartegena in Jan of 2020 (due to concerns with the hot humid environments we we're sailing in and also concerns about potentially having to purchase fuel with some bio-diesel in it)
- changing the Yanmar fuel filter is one of my less favorite maintenance tasks. Yes it's pretty straight forward and thanks for Bill Rouse simple instructions, but it's always a bit messy and I don't like the smell of diesel in the engine room.
- right now I'm chalking it up to restricted fuel flow due to dirty filters, but I guess that I was surprised to see it show up suddenly at idle.

Fair winds to all, 

Daniel and Lori Carlson on sv BeBe, SM #387, currently in Antigua



On Fri, Feb 5, 2021, 11:18 AM Karen Smith via groups.io <karenharmonie=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Daniel,

I don't have any amazing magic things to add to what others have said, but I would STRONGLY discourage you from fiddling with the idle speed adjustment on the injection pump.  The inability to run stably at normal idle speed is a symptom, not the first cause of a failure.

This is not like the mixture adjustment on your outboard carburetor. It does not control the fuel flow itself, rather it controls the set point of a speed governor than then in turn adjusts the fuel rack.  Adjusting the idle speed adjustment is not typically done as part of a repair, but is part of the set up of the injection pump.

If you can get the engine running at a stable speed (slower is easier for this test) it might be worth opening the nut on the injectors, one at a time.  When disconnected, each injector should have a similar effect on the speed/smoothness of operation.  If one has little or no effect, then that injector is likely bad or clogged.

Another trick that can help sort out things, put a piece of clear plastic tubing into the system just before the lift pump.  If you see bubbles flowing by when running then you know you have an air leak that needs fixing.  If you see only clear fuel flow, then you can check off everything upstream of this as OK.  With your fuel tank nearly full, I doubt this is the problem, but it helps to be sure.

Last thing, I might have missed this, but if not yet done, changing the secondary fuel filter on the engine would be a good idea.  Again, not a likely, but a possible, cause of this kind of problem. For this filter, I would recommend (if possible) using a Yanmar OEM filter.  Some of the aftermarket filters have smaller elements and add excess restriction to fuel flow, especially after then get a bit of dirt in them. Normally problems with this filter are seen at high speed, not idle, but you have checked most all the easy boxes, so the less likely ones are what is left.

Tracking down fuel system issues like this can be a pain, but it will work out.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Charleston, SC


eric freedman
 

HI,

Do you have an alarm or idiot light indicating that there is water in the Yanmar engine mounted filter?

If you do not you do not need to use that water sensing float  and the special filter for that.

You can just change over to a regular (cheaper)  Yanmar filter without the wiring. On my old engine 4jh3hte with a “B’ Panel there was no need for the water float.

Changing that special filter with the wires attached was always a messy job.

 

My 2 cents with respect to your original problem is that the O ring in the Racor filter or the Yanmar fuel filter started to leak .

Stick with the Howes Meaner power cleaner. It is good for all situations.

I also use 2 micron filters in my Racor filters.

10 micron is suggested but the 2 micron works perfectly well.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dan Carlson
Sent: Friday, February 05, 2021 1:52 PM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Yanmar no start.

 

Thanks all for the helpful tips which also provides great emotional support :-) Nothing like a hick-up with your main engine out at anchor to get a little anxiety up.

 

All appears good now.

 

I changed both racor filters which had both been used since last changed. The in-use racor had noticably more dirt on it.  I also changed the fuel filters on both the Yanmar and Onan as they were right at a year since last change and the Yanmar had over 400 hrs due to above normal use on the long haul from the Caribbean to Chesapeake Bay in May and back after hurricane season this November. 

 

Both engines started and ran fine. 

 

I can suspect that a lot of extra motoring/motor-sailing, often when beating to the windward could have contributed to added gunk load on the fuel filters.  Also, in the last couple months we have had six rollicking reaches back and forth between Antigua and Barbuda with only about 200 liters sloshing around in the fuel tank. They were all sailing except the final 45 min to an hour using stirred up fuel to get into the anchorage. And the we just refueled last week as well, immediately motor-sailing for over a hour around to our anchorage.  Plenty of reasons to stir up the tank and add load to the fuel filters.

 

A few additional points:

- there were no issues with the Onan (but now with the LiFePo batteries it only had 100 hours over the last year and I'm sure that will go down more with my added solar capacity)

- no signs of water in the Racor bowls, or fuel drained from either the Yanmar or Onan fuel filters. 

- Fuel filters are Racor, Yanmar and Onan OEM parts.

- last month when I was down to about 180 liters in the tank, I opened the rear tank inspection port and could clearly see to the bottom of the tank and it was clean stainless steel. Could still be a little gunk in the corners or far forward. 

- I have been using Howes fuel treatment the last due refuelings, as well as a Valvetech biocide since Cartegena in Jan of 2020 (due to concerns with the hot humid environments we we're sailing in and also concerns about potentially having to purchase fuel with some bio-diesel in it)

- changing the Yanmar fuel filter is one of my less favorite maintenance tasks. Yes it's pretty straight forward and thanks for Bill Rouse simple instructions, but it's always a bit messy and I don't like the smell of diesel in the engine room.

- right now I'm chalking it up to restricted fuel flow due to dirty filters, but I guess that I was surprised to see it show up suddenly at idle.

 

Fair winds to all, 

 

Daniel and Lori Carlson on sv BeBe, SM #387, currently in Antigua

 

 

 

On Fri, Feb 5, 2021, 11:18 AM Karen Smith via groups.io <karenharmonie=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Daniel,

I don't have any amazing magic things to add to what others have said, but I would STRONGLY discourage you from fiddling with the idle speed adjustment on the injection pump.  The inability to run stably at normal idle speed is a symptom, not the first cause of a failure.

This is not like the mixture adjustment on your outboard carburetor. It does not control the fuel flow itself, rather it controls the set point of a speed governor than then in turn adjusts the fuel rack.  Adjusting the idle speed adjustment is not typically done as part of a repair, but is part of the set up of the injection pump.

If you can get the engine running at a stable speed (slower is easier for this test) it might be worth opening the nut on the injectors, one at a time.  When disconnected, each injector should have a similar effect on the speed/smoothness of operation.  If one has little or no effect, then that injector is likely bad or clogged.

Another trick that can help sort out things, put a piece of clear plastic tubing into the system just before the lift pump.  If you see bubbles flowing by when running then you know you have an air leak that needs fixing.  If you see only clear fuel flow, then you can check off everything upstream of this as OK.  With your fuel tank nearly full, I doubt this is the problem, but it helps to be sure.

Last thing, I might have missed this, but if not yet done, changing the secondary fuel filter on the engine would be a good idea.  Again, not a likely, but a possible, cause of this kind of problem. For this filter, I would recommend (if possible) using a Yanmar OEM filter.  Some of the aftermarket filters have smaller elements and add excess restriction to fuel flow, especially after then get a bit of dirt in them. Normally problems with this filter are seen at high speed, not idle, but you have checked most all the easy boxes, so the less likely ones are what is left.

Tracking down fuel system issues like this can be a pain, but it will work out.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Charleston, SC


eric freedman
 

Hi Dan,

Did you ever check the filter inside the fuel tank?

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dan Carlson
Sent: Friday, February 05, 2021 1:52 PM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Yanmar no start.

 

Thanks all for the helpful tips which also provides great emotional support :-) Nothing like a hick-up with your main engine out at anchor to get a little anxiety up.

 

All appears good now.

 

I changed both racor filters which had both been used since last changed. The in-use racor had noticably more dirt on it.  I also changed the fuel filters on both the Yanmar and Onan as they were right at a year since last change and the Yanmar had over 400 hrs due to above normal use on the long haul from the Caribbean to Chesapeake Bay in May and back after hurricane season this November. 

 

Both engines started and ran fine. 

 

I can suspect that a lot of extra motoring/motor-sailing, often when beating to the windward could have contributed to added gunk load on the fuel filters.  Also, in the last couple months we have had six rollicking reaches back and forth between Antigua and Barbuda with only about 200 liters sloshing around in the fuel tank. They were all sailing except the final 45 min to an hour using stirred up fuel to get into the anchorage. And the we just refueled last week as well, immediately motor-sailing for over a hour around to our anchorage.  Plenty of reasons to stir up the tank and add load to the fuel filters.

 

A few additional points:

- there were no issues with the Onan (but now with the LiFePo batteries it only had 100 hours over the last year and I'm sure that will go down more with my added solar capacity)

- no signs of water in the Racor bowls, or fuel drained from either the Yanmar or Onan fuel filters. 

- Fuel filters are Racor, Yanmar and Onan OEM parts.

- last month when I was down to about 180 liters in the tank, I opened the rear tank inspection port and could clearly see to the bottom of the tank and it was clean stainless steel. Could still be a little gunk in the corners or far forward. 

- I have been using Howes fuel treatment the last due refuelings, as well as a Valvetech biocide since Cartegena in Jan of 2020 (due to concerns with the hot humid environments we we're sailing in and also concerns about potentially having to purchase fuel with some bio-diesel in it)

- changing the Yanmar fuel filter is one of my less favorite maintenance tasks. Yes it's pretty straight forward and thanks for Bill Rouse simple instructions, but it's always a bit messy and I don't like the smell of diesel in the engine room.

- right now I'm chalking it up to restricted fuel flow due to dirty filters, but I guess that I was surprised to see it show up suddenly at idle.

 

Fair winds to all, 

 

Daniel and Lori Carlson on sv BeBe, SM #387, currently in Antigua

 

 

 

On Fri, Feb 5, 2021, 11:18 AM Karen Smith via groups.io <karenharmonie=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Daniel,

I don't have any amazing magic things to add to what others have said, but I would STRONGLY discourage you from fiddling with the idle speed adjustment on the injection pump.  The inability to run stably at normal idle speed is a symptom, not the first cause of a failure.

This is not like the mixture adjustment on your outboard carburetor. It does not control the fuel flow itself, rather it controls the set point of a speed governor than then in turn adjusts the fuel rack.  Adjusting the idle speed adjustment is not typically done as part of a repair, but is part of the set up of the injection pump.

If you can get the engine running at a stable speed (slower is easier for this test) it might be worth opening the nut on the injectors, one at a time.  When disconnected, each injector should have a similar effect on the speed/smoothness of operation.  If one has little or no effect, then that injector is likely bad or clogged.

Another trick that can help sort out things, put a piece of clear plastic tubing into the system just before the lift pump.  If you see bubbles flowing by when running then you know you have an air leak that needs fixing.  If you see only clear fuel flow, then you can check off everything upstream of this as OK.  With your fuel tank nearly full, I doubt this is the problem, but it helps to be sure.

Last thing, I might have missed this, but if not yet done, changing the secondary fuel filter on the engine would be a good idea.  Again, not a likely, but a possible, cause of this kind of problem. For this filter, I would recommend (if possible) using a Yanmar OEM filter.  Some of the aftermarket filters have smaller elements and add excess restriction to fuel flow, especially after then get a bit of dirt in them. Normally problems with this filter are seen at high speed, not idle, but you have checked most all the easy boxes, so the less likely ones are what is left.

Tracking down fuel system issues like this can be a pain, but it will work out.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Charleston, SC


Dan Carlson
 

Hello Eric, 

Several times when I've had less than 200 liters of fuel in the tank I've removed the inspection port  covers to look inside the tank.  I've never emptied the tank completely. 

What I can also say is that when I changed the racor filters and opened the valve to refill the bowls on each side that the fuel flowed very freely from the tank to the racors. So I don't think that there was any obstruction there. 

I do have the wiring for the water detector on the Yanmar fuel filter, but I've never drained any water from that fuel filter, or from the simple drain on the bottom of the Onan fuel filter, or seen any water in the Racor bowls (which is the first place that I'd expect to find water, and I inspect pretty regularly).

Thanks for the extra recco's.

 Best regards, Daniel Carlson, on sv BeBe, SM #387

On Fri, Feb 5, 2021, 8:14 PM eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:

Hi Dan,

Did you ever check the filter inside the fuel tank?

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dan Carlson
Sent: Friday, February 05, 2021 1:52 PM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Yanmar no start.

 

Thanks all for the helpful tips which also provides great emotional support :-) Nothing like a hick-up with your main engine out at anchor to get a little anxiety up.

 

All appears good now.

 

I changed both racor filters which had both been used since last changed. The in-use racor had noticably more dirt on it.  I also changed the fuel filters on both the Yanmar and Onan as they were right at a year since last change and the Yanmar had over 400 hrs due to above normal use on the long haul from the Caribbean to Chesapeake Bay in May and back after hurricane season this November. 

 

Both engines started and ran fine. 

 

I can suspect that a lot of extra motoring/motor-sailing, often when beating to the windward could have contributed to added gunk load on the fuel filters.  Also, in the last couple months we have had six rollicking reaches back and forth between Antigua and Barbuda with only about 200 liters sloshing around in the fuel tank. They were all sailing except the final 45 min to an hour using stirred up fuel to get into the anchorage. And the we just refueled last week as well, immediately motor-sailing for over a hour around to our anchorage.  Plenty of reasons to stir up the tank and add load to the fuel filters.

 

A few additional points:

- there were no issues with the Onan (but now with the LiFePo batteries it only had 100 hours over the last year and I'm sure that will go down more with my added solar capacity)

- no signs of water in the Racor bowls, or fuel drained from either the Yanmar or Onan fuel filters. 

- Fuel filters are Racor, Yanmar and Onan OEM parts.

- last month when I was down to about 180 liters in the tank, I opened the rear tank inspection port and could clearly see to the bottom of the tank and it was clean stainless steel. Could still be a little gunk in the corners or far forward. 

- I have been using Howes fuel treatment the last due refuelings, as well as a Valvetech biocide since Cartegena in Jan of 2020 (due to concerns with the hot humid environments we we're sailing in and also concerns about potentially having to purchase fuel with some bio-diesel in it)

- changing the Yanmar fuel filter is one of my less favorite maintenance tasks. Yes it's pretty straight forward and thanks for Bill Rouse simple instructions, but it's always a bit messy and I don't like the smell of diesel in the engine room.

- right now I'm chalking it up to restricted fuel flow due to dirty filters, but I guess that I was surprised to see it show up suddenly at idle.

 

Fair winds to all, 

 

Daniel and Lori Carlson on sv BeBe, SM #387, currently in Antigua

 

 

 

On Fri, Feb 5, 2021, 11:18 AM Karen Smith via groups.io <karenharmonie=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Daniel,

I don't have any amazing magic things to add to what others have said, but I would STRONGLY discourage you from fiddling with the idle speed adjustment on the injection pump.  The inability to run stably at normal idle speed is a symptom, not the first cause of a failure.

This is not like the mixture adjustment on your outboard carburetor. It does not control the fuel flow itself, rather it controls the set point of a speed governor than then in turn adjusts the fuel rack.  Adjusting the idle speed adjustment is not typically done as part of a repair, but is part of the set up of the injection pump.

If you can get the engine running at a stable speed (slower is easier for this test) it might be worth opening the nut on the injectors, one at a time.  When disconnected, each injector should have a similar effect on the speed/smoothness of operation.  If one has little or no effect, then that injector is likely bad or clogged.

Another trick that can help sort out things, put a piece of clear plastic tubing into the system just before the lift pump.  If you see bubbles flowing by when running then you know you have an air leak that needs fixing.  If you see only clear fuel flow, then you can check off everything upstream of this as OK.  With your fuel tank nearly full, I doubt this is the problem, but it helps to be sure.

Last thing, I might have missed this, but if not yet done, changing the secondary fuel filter on the engine would be a good idea.  Again, not a likely, but a possible, cause of this kind of problem. For this filter, I would recommend (if possible) using a Yanmar OEM filter.  Some of the aftermarket filters have smaller elements and add excess restriction to fuel flow, especially after then get a bit of dirt in them. Normally problems with this filter are seen at high speed, not idle, but you have checked most all the easy boxes, so the less likely ones are what is left.

Tracking down fuel system issues like this can be a pain, but it will work out.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Charleston, SC


JB Duler
 

Sometimes you only think about the bottom of the tank and the Raccor filters.

But the actual hoses between the tank and the filters may have deteriorated INSIDE over the years.  They look OK from the outside.

That creates all king of problems, you get the tank empty, get it cleaned and sometime it is a recurring a problem.

Change the gas lines every 10–20 years, unless it is metal of course/

On Feb 5, 2021, at 17:26, Dan Carlson <carlsdan61@...> wrote:

Hello Eric, 

Several times when I've had less than 200 liters of fuel in the tank I've removed the inspection port  covers to look inside the tank.  I've never emptied the tank completely. 

What I can also say is that when I changed the racor filters and opened the valve to refill the bowls on each side that the fuel flowed very freely from the tank to the racors. So I don't think that there was any obstruction there. 

I do have the wiring for the water detector on the Yanmar fuel filter, but I've never drained any water from that fuel filter, or from the simple drain on the bottom of the Onan fuel filter, or seen any water in the Racor bowls (which is the first place that I'd expect to find water, and I inspect pretty regularly).

Thanks for the extra recco's.

 Best regards, Daniel Carlson, on sv BeBe, SM #387

On Fri, Feb 5, 2021, 8:14 PM eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:

Hi Dan,

Did you ever check the filter inside the fuel tank?

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dan Carlson
Sent: Friday, February 05, 2021 1:52 PM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Yanmar no start.

 

Thanks all for the helpful tips which also provides great emotional support :-) Nothing like a hick-up with your main engine out at anchor to get a little anxiety up.

 

All appears good now.

 

I changed both racor filters which had both been used since last changed. The in-use racor had noticably more dirt on it.  I also changed the fuel filters on both the Yanmar and Onan as they were right at a year since last change and the Yanmar had over 400 hrs due to above normal use on the long haul from the Caribbean to Chesapeake Bay in May and back after hurricane season this November. 

 

Both engines started and ran fine. 

 

I can suspect that a lot of extra motoring/motor-sailing, often when beating to the windward could have contributed to added gunk load on the fuel filters.  Also, in the last couple months we have had six rollicking reaches back and forth between Antigua and Barbuda with only about 200 liters sloshing around in the fuel tank. They were all sailing except the final 45 min to an hour using stirred up fuel to get into the anchorage. And the we just refueled last week as well, immediately motor-sailing for over a hour around to our anchorage.  Plenty of reasons to stir up the tank and add load to the fuel filters.

 

A few additional points:

- there were no issues with the Onan (but now with the LiFePo batteries it only had 100 hours over the last year and I'm sure that will go down more with my added solar capacity)

- no signs of water in the Racor bowls, or fuel drained from either the Yanmar or Onan fuel filters. 

- Fuel filters are Racor, Yanmar and Onan OEM parts.

- last month when I was down to about 180 liters in the tank, I opened the rear tank inspection port and could clearly see to the bottom of the tank and it was clean stainless steel. Could still be a little gunk in the corners or far forward. 

- I have been using Howes fuel treatment the last due refuelings, as well as a Valvetech biocide since Cartegena in Jan of 2020 (due to concerns with the hot humid environments we we're sailing in and also concerns about potentially having to purchase fuel with some bio-diesel in it)

- changing the Yanmar fuel filter is one of my less favorite maintenance tasks. Yes it's pretty straight forward and thanks for Bill Rouse simple instructions, but it's always a bit messy and I don't like the smell of diesel in the engine room.

- right now I'm chalking it up to restricted fuel flow due to dirty filters, but I guess that I was surprised to see it show up suddenly at idle.

 

Fair winds to all, 

 

Daniel and Lori Carlson on sv BeBe, SM #387, currently in Antigua

 

 

 

On Fri, Feb 5, 2021, 11:18 AM Karen Smith via groups.io <karenharmonie=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Daniel,

I don't have any amazing magic things to add to what others have said, but I would STRONGLY discourage you from fiddling with the idle speed adjustment on the injection pump.  The inability to run stably at normal idle speed is a symptom, not the first cause of a failure.

This is not like the mixture adjustment on your outboard carburetor. It does not control the fuel flow itself, rather it controls the set point of a speed governor than then in turn adjusts the fuel rack.  Adjusting the idle speed adjustment is not typically done as part of a repair, but is part of the set up of the injection pump.

If you can get the engine running at a stable speed (slower is easier for this test) it might be worth opening the nut on the injectors, one at a time.  When disconnected, each injector should have a similar effect on the speed/smoothness of operation.  If one has little or no effect, then that injector is likely bad or clogged.

Another trick that can help sort out things, put a piece of clear plastic tubing into the system just before the lift pump.  If you see bubbles flowing by when running then you know you have an air leak that needs fixing.  If you see only clear fuel flow, then you can check off everything upstream of this as OK.  With your fuel tank nearly full, I doubt this is the problem, but it helps to be sure.

Last thing, I might have missed this, but if not yet done, changing the secondary fuel filter on the engine would be a good idea.  Again, not a likely, but a possible, cause of this kind of problem. For this filter, I would recommend (if possible) using a Yanmar OEM filter.  Some of the aftermarket filters have smaller elements and add excess restriction to fuel flow, especially after then get a bit of dirt in them. Normally problems with this filter are seen at high speed, not idle, but you have checked most all the easy boxes, so the less likely ones are what is left.

Tracking down fuel system issues like this can be a pain, but it will work out.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Charleston, SC





--
John Bernard "JB" Duler
San Francisco
Meltem # 19, Western Med


eric freedman
 

Hi Dan

Inside the tank there is a screen that in my case got full of silicone that Amel used to seal the inspection ports.

The engine would run fine for days and then suddenly stop. After crossing the Atlantic I was 5 miles from home and the crew said call for a tow—the hell I will. I finally realized that there was a blockage inside the tank. I disconnected the fuel line and put the bell of an air horn over the hose and when I heard bubbling, problem solved. When I got home I drained the tank and took the bottom valve apart and found the “filter” like is used in the shower drains, full of gunk.

 

Next fuel filter change ditch the filter and sensor and get the regular Yanmar filter.  I only know of this as I am installing a new Yanmar 4jh4hte and I traced the wire back as I was rewiring the new engine for an isolated ground . The wire goes into the harness and ends not connected in the control panel. I am using my existing “b” panel .Possibly it is connected in another panel. You can check the harness wiring diagram to see if is doing anything in your unit.

 

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dan Carlson
Sent: Friday, February 05, 2021 8:27 PM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Yanmar no start.

 

Hello Eric, 

 

Several times when I've had less than 200 liters of fuel in the tank I've removed the inspection port  covers to look inside the tank.  I've never emptied the tank completely. 

 

What I can also say is that when I changed the racor filters and opened the valve to refill the bowls on each side that the fuel flowed very freely from the tank to the racors. So I don't think that there was any obstruction there. 

 

I do have the wiring for the water detector on the Yanmar fuel filter, but I've never drained any water from that fuel filter, or from the simple drain on the bottom of the Onan fuel filter, or seen any water in the Racor bowls (which is the first place that I'd expect to find water, and I inspect pretty regularly).

 

Thanks for the extra recco's.

 

 Best regards, Daniel Carlson, on sv BeBe, SM #387

 

On Fri, Feb 5, 2021, 8:14 PM eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:

Hi Dan,

Did you ever check the filter inside the fuel tank?

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dan Carlson
Sent: Friday, February 05, 2021 1:52 PM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Yanmar no start.

 

Thanks all for the helpful tips which also provides great emotional support :-) Nothing like a hick-up with your main engine out at anchor to get a little anxiety up.

 

All appears good now.

 

I changed both racor filters which had both been used since last changed. The in-use racor had noticably more dirt on it.  I also changed the fuel filters on both the Yanmar and Onan as they were right at a year since last change and the Yanmar had over 400 hrs due to above normal use on the long haul from the Caribbean to Chesapeake Bay in May and back after hurricane season this November. 

 

Both engines started and ran fine. 

 

I can suspect that a lot of extra motoring/motor-sailing, often when beating to the windward could have contributed to added gunk load on the fuel filters.  Also, in the last couple months we have had six rollicking reaches back and forth between Antigua and Barbuda with only about 200 liters sloshing around in the fuel tank. They were all sailing except the final 45 min to an hour using stirred up fuel to get into the anchorage. And the we just refueled last week as well, immediately motor-sailing for over a hour around to our anchorage.  Plenty of reasons to stir up the tank and add load to the fuel filters.

 

A few additional points:

- there were no issues with the Onan (but now with the LiFePo batteries it only had 100 hours over the last year and I'm sure that will go down more with my added solar capacity)

- no signs of water in the Racor bowls, or fuel drained from either the Yanmar or Onan fuel filters. 

- Fuel filters are Racor, Yanmar and Onan OEM parts.

- last month when I was down to about 180 liters in the tank, I opened the rear tank inspection port and could clearly see to the bottom of the tank and it was clean stainless steel. Could still be a little gunk in the corners or far forward. 

- I have been using Howes fuel treatment the last due refuelings, as well as a Valvetech biocide since Cartegena in Jan of 2020 (due to concerns with the hot humid environments we we're sailing in and also concerns about potentially having to purchase fuel with some bio-diesel in it)

- changing the Yanmar fuel filter is one of my less favorite maintenance tasks. Yes it's pretty straight forward and thanks for Bill Rouse simple instructions, but it's always a bit messy and I don't like the smell of diesel in the engine room.

- right now I'm chalking it up to restricted fuel flow due to dirty filters, but I guess that I was surprised to see it show up suddenly at idle.

 

Fair winds to all, 

 

Daniel and Lori Carlson on sv BeBe, SM #387, currently in Antigua

 

 

 

On Fri, Feb 5, 2021, 11:18 AM Karen Smith via groups.io <karenharmonie=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Daniel,

I don't have any amazing magic things to add to what others have said, but I would STRONGLY discourage you from fiddling with the idle speed adjustment on the injection pump.  The inability to run stably at normal idle speed is a symptom, not the first cause of a failure.

This is not like the mixture adjustment on your outboard carburetor. It does not control the fuel flow itself, rather it controls the set point of a speed governor than then in turn adjusts the fuel rack.  Adjusting the idle speed adjustment is not typically done as part of a repair, but is part of the set up of the injection pump.

If you can get the engine running at a stable speed (slower is easier for this test) it might be worth opening the nut on the injectors, one at a time.  When disconnected, each injector should have a similar effect on the speed/smoothness of operation.  If one has little or no effect, then that injector is likely bad or clogged.

Another trick that can help sort out things, put a piece of clear plastic tubing into the system just before the lift pump.  If you see bubbles flowing by when running then you know you have an air leak that needs fixing.  If you see only clear fuel flow, then you can check off everything upstream of this as OK.  With your fuel tank nearly full, I doubt this is the problem, but it helps to be sure.

Last thing, I might have missed this, but if not yet done, changing the secondary fuel filter on the engine would be a good idea.  Again, not a likely, but a possible, cause of this kind of problem. For this filter, I would recommend (if possible) using a Yanmar OEM filter.  Some of the aftermarket filters have smaller elements and add excess restriction to fuel flow, especially after then get a bit of dirt in them. Normally problems with this filter are seen at high speed, not idle, but you have checked most all the easy boxes, so the less likely ones are what is left.

Tracking down fuel system issues like this can be a pain, but it will work out.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Charleston, SC