Raspberry Pi


Bill Kinney
 

I use an R-pi4 to collect, save (using InfluxDB) , and display data (using Grafana)  from my Victron system while we are off grid and unconnected to the internet.  It draws very little power itself, and was scary cheap, even with a 250GB SSD to hold data.  I installed it without its own display and keyboard, just looking at data with a wireless connection from my computer or tablet.  

I'm not a huge computer nerd, and would just assume avoid those kinds of details, but it wasn't that hard to configure with suitable internet tutorials holding my hand. 

Victron's level of support for things like this that are officially "unsupported" is great.  https://github.com/victronenergy/venus-docker-grafana

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Hollywood, FL, USA


John Facci
 

Hi Mark,

 

I got inspired by the SeaBits write-up a couple of weeks ago and my NMEA 2000 interface board turned up a few days ago. I haven’t purchased the Raspberry Pi 4 yet as I thought the NMEA board would take ages from the UK.

 

We already use a Raspberry Pi Zero and Pimoroni Automation HAT (to make dealing with 24v easy) to monitor: Onan and Yanmar exhaust temp. Engine room temp, water tank (over fill) level, anchor wash runtime (In the future I may convert anchor wash to fresh water and I’m always forgetting to turn it off). Bilge runtime and frequency. When an alarm threshold is reached a buzzer is enabled.

All the data collected is stored in a MySQL database. A separate php script allows me to view reports and graphs via a web browser.

The Pi Zero also runs Pi-Hole (internet ad filter) and a simple web based ToDo list.

 

John and Jane

KAOS SM 332

Brisbane


Mark Erdos
 

Ah, yes. Beer: the universal currency of cruisers.

Good luck with your project.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Mark Garver via groups.io

Sent: Friday, April 23, 2021 5:04 AM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Cc: AmelYachtOwners@groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Raspberry Pi

 

Mark,

 

I am heading down this path myself. Like you I have a friend that has his whole boat tricked out just as you describe and it is amazing and VERY inexpensive. Another incredible benefit is power consumption of a Raspberry PI computer vs a traditional computer and other electronics. On his boat not only can he view the status of his boat if there is Internet connectivity, he can control many functions remote as well.

 

Good luck if you go down this path, it will be worth it. Fortunately, for me my friend is going to do all of the work for me :) Cost me a couple of beers!

 

Best,

 

Mark

S/V It’s Good

Amel SM #105

Currently in Chesapeake Bay



On Apr 22, 2021, at 7:24 PM, Mark Erdos <mcerdos@...> wrote:

 

I am curious if anyone in this group is using Raspberry Pi’s as a computer aboard. 

 

Yesterday, I was on a friends boat. His entire NMEA network, entertainment and programs were available on any monitor on the boat (via a wireless router). With a click of the mouse he can view charts (OpenCPN or Time Zero), anchor alarm status, wind speed (and all related navigation information), battery status, solar panels etc. on any of the standard 5 mounted LED monitors on the vessel. The entire system cost him about US$1,000 (including the monitors). He can even split screen sailing info and watch a movie at the helm while on watch. His entire vast media library is 100% available at any station.

 

The best part: he has various alarms set up and the Raspberry Pi monitors. With the 12v LED monitors off, the system draws only 0.4 amps at 12 vdc. So, his anchor, battery voltage, or AIS alarms etc are all able to run 24/7.

 

While the vessel is in an anchorage or marina with internet connectivity, he can use his phone to remote access the entire onboard network to see the status of his boat systems. For example, he can check to see if the bilge pump has cycled and how many times. 

 

I am a big proponent of using an onboard PC rather than a plotter and manufacture network (such as Raymarine’s Seatalk). I have all of my instruments connected to the ships computer and can display everything on one monitor (with an option for a second). However, my system is now about 8 years old and I was stunned to find the entire setup could be replaced with a US$99 Raspberry Pi. 

 

I would be interested to hear about what others are using or if anyone plans to go this route.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

 

 


Mark Garver
 

Mark,

I am heading down this path myself. Like you I have a friend that has his whole boat tricked out just as you describe and it is amazing and VERY inexpensive. Another incredible benefit is power consumption of a Raspberry PI computer vs a traditional computer and other electronics. On his boat not only can he view the status of his boat if there is Internet connectivity, he can control many functions remote as well.

Good luck if you go down this path, it will be worth it. Fortunately, for me my friend is going to do all of the work for me :) Cost me a couple of beers!

Best,

Mark
S/V It’s Good
Amel SM #105
Currently in Chesapeake Bay

On Apr 22, 2021, at 7:24 PM, Mark Erdos <mcerdos@...> wrote:

I am curious if anyone in this group is using Raspberry Pi’s as a computer aboard. 
 
Yesterday, I was on a friends boat. His entire NMEA network, entertainment and programs were available on any monitor on the boat (via a wireless router). With a click of the mouse he can view charts (OpenCPN or Time Zero), anchor alarm status, wind speed (and all related navigation information), battery status, solar panels etc. on any of the standard 5 mounted LED monitors on the vessel. The entire system cost him about US$1,000 (including the monitors). He can even split screen sailing info and watch a movie at the helm while on watch. His entire vast media library is 100% available at any station.
 
The best part: he has various alarms set up and the Raspberry Pi monitors. With the 12v LED monitors off, the system draws only 0.4 amps at 12 vdc. So, his anchor, battery voltage, or AIS alarms etc are all able to run 24/7.
 
While the vessel is in an anchorage or marina with internet connectivity, he can use his phone to remote access the entire onboard network to see the status of his boat systems. For example, he can check to see if the bilge pump has cycled and how many times. 
 
I am a big proponent of using an onboard PC rather than a plotter and manufacture network (such as Raymarine’s Seatalk). I have all of my instruments connected to the ships computer and can display everything on one monitor (with an option for a second). However, my system is now about 8 years old and I was stunned to find the entire setup could be replaced with a US$99 Raspberry Pi. 
 
I would be interested to hear about what others are using or if anyone plans to go this route.
 
 
With best regards,
 
Mark
 
Skipper
Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275
Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia
 


Billy Newport
 

I have a Pi 4 on my 55. I added a yachtd NMEA-2K to Wifi bridge. This allows my PI to sniff all NMEA data on the furuno N2K backdone. I have an RTL/433Mhz dongle on my PI. This collects temperature/humidity readings from the cabins/engine room/diesel heater return/frigoboat compressors/fridges/freezeers. 433Mhz is key here as it's dirt cheap for sensors (10 bucks US each).
I store all the data in a time series database (influxdb) using telemetry/node red to do that. I am using grafana to build dashboards.
The yachtd Wifi bridge also lets me create NMEA events so I am able to send non NMEA data above back to NMEA to visualize on the Furuno plotters.
This is still a work in progress. I am looking at using signal k to "standardize" the above also. With the price of cheap tablets, it'd be easy to add such tablets around the boat to look at the various dashboards that can be built.


Philippe BELLOIR
 

Hello,

I use raspberry with openplotter  see at https://openmarine.net/openplotter

 

And all connections with wifi, phone, nmea….   http://yvesc0610.free.fr/nmea/NMEA_LOGICIELS.html

 

I found a lot of hardware on aliexpress like this  https://fr.aliexpress.com/item/32730291445.html?spm=a2g0s.9042311.0.0.e4c14c4dXsl72d

 

Fairs winds

Phil

 

 

De : main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> De la part de Mark Erdos
Envoyé : vendredi 23 avril 2021 02:24
À : AmelYachtOwners@groups.io
Objet : [AmelYachtOwners] Raspberry Pi

 

I am curious if anyone in this group is using Raspberry Pi’s as a computer aboard.

 

Yesterday, I was on a friends boat. His entire NMEA network, entertainment and programs were available on any monitor on the boat (via a wireless router). With a click of the mouse he can view charts (OpenCPN or Time Zero), anchor alarm status, wind speed (and all related navigation information), battery status, solar panels etc. on any of the standard 5 mounted LED monitors on the vessel. The entire system cost him about US$1,000 (including the monitors). He can even split screen sailing info and watch a movie at the helm while on watch. His entire vast media library is 100% available at any station.

 

The best part: he has various alarms set up and the Raspberry Pi monitors. With the 12v LED monitors off, the system draws only 0.4 amps at 12 vdc. So, his anchor, battery voltage, or AIS alarms etc are all able to run 24/7.

 

While the vessel is in an anchorage or marina with internet connectivity, he can use his phone to remote access the entire onboard network to see the status of his boat systems. For example, he can check to see if the bilge pump has cycled and how many times.

 

I am a big proponent of using an onboard PC rather than a plotter and manufacture network (such as Raymarine’s Seatalk). I have all of my instruments connected to the ships computer and can display everything on one monitor (with an option for a second). However, my system is now about 8 years old and I was stunned to find the entire setup could be replaced with a US$99 Raspberry Pi.

 

I would be interested to hear about what others are using or if anyone plans to go this route.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

www.creampuff.us

 


Mark Erdos
 

Thanks Paul, I enjoyed the read.

 

I think he was running Linux on the Pi. His Raspberry was powered by PoE (the router connection).

 

I am not sure if the TimeZero was running on the Pi or on the Windows PC. They are linked together. I think TZ only runs on Windows. He can open both on one monitor and the NMEA info is shared. This is something I can’t do with my set up. I can either run OpenCPN or TZ on my LCD monitor. But, not both. The GPS NMEA cannot be shared. I have to close one and open the other. But, the Raspberry Pi works around this.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Paul Harries via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, April 22, 2021 2:40 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Raspberry Pi

 

Have you seen this?

https://www.google.com/amp/s/seabits.com/nmea-2000-powered-raspberry-pi/%3famp


Paul Harries
 

Have you seen this?
https://www.google.com/amp/s/seabits.com/nmea-2000-powered-raspberry-pi/%3famp


Paul Harries
 

What software was installed on the raspberry Pi?


On Thu, Apr 22, 2021 at 19:14, Mark Erdos
<mcerdos@...> wrote:

I am curious if anyone in this group is using Raspberry Pi’s as a computer aboard.

 

Yesterday, I was on a friends boat. His entire NMEA network, entertainment and programs were available on any monitor on the boat (via a wireless router). With a click of the mouse he can view charts (OpenCPN or Time Zero), anchor alarm status, wind speed (and all related navigation information), battery status, solar panels etc. on any of the standard 5 mounted LED monitors on the vessel. The entire system cost him about US$1,000 (including the monitors). He can even split screen sailing info and watch a movie at the helm while on watch. His entire vast media library is 100% available at any station.

 

The best part: he has various alarms set up and the Raspberry Pi monitors. With the 12v LED monitors off, the system draws only 0.4 amps at 12 vdc. So, his anchor, battery voltage, or AIS alarms etc are all able to run 24/7.

 

While the vessel is in an anchorage or marina with internet connectivity, he can use his phone to remote access the entire onboard network to see the status of his boat systems. For example, he can check to see if the bilge pump has cycled and how many times.

 

I am a big proponent of using an onboard PC rather than a plotter and manufacture network (such as Raymarine’s Seatalk). I have all of my instruments connected to the ships computer and can display everything on one monitor (with an option for a second). However, my system is now about 8 years old and I was stunned to find the entire setup could be replaced with a US$99 Raspberry Pi.

 

I would be interested to hear about what others are using or if anyone plans to go this route.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

www.creampuff.us

 


Mark Erdos
 

I am curious if anyone in this group is using Raspberry Pi’s as a computer aboard.

 

Yesterday, I was on a friends boat. His entire NMEA network, entertainment and programs were available on any monitor on the boat (via a wireless router). With a click of the mouse he can view charts (OpenCPN or Time Zero), anchor alarm status, wind speed (and all related navigation information), battery status, solar panels etc. on any of the standard 5 mounted LED monitors on the vessel. The entire system cost him about US$1,000 (including the monitors). He can even split screen sailing info and watch a movie at the helm while on watch. His entire vast media library is 100% available at any station.

 

The best part: he has various alarms set up and the Raspberry Pi monitors. With the 12v LED monitors off, the system draws only 0.4 amps at 12 vdc. So, his anchor, battery voltage, or AIS alarms etc are all able to run 24/7.

 

While the vessel is in an anchorage or marina with internet connectivity, he can use his phone to remote access the entire onboard network to see the status of his boat systems. For example, he can check to see if the bilge pump has cycled and how many times.

 

I am a big proponent of using an onboard PC rather than a plotter and manufacture network (such as Raymarine’s Seatalk). I have all of my instruments connected to the ships computer and can display everything on one monitor (with an option for a second). However, my system is now about 8 years old and I was stunned to find the entire setup could be replaced with a US$99 Raspberry Pi.

 

I would be interested to hear about what others are using or if anyone plans to go this route.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

www.creampuff.us