Seasickness cures and medication


Eric Freedman
 

I was asked by a crewmember to poll the group to find out what Amel owners used

and recommended for seasickness.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 


Mark Garver
 

Eric,

We keep a good supply of ginger gum aboard and my wife swears by its effectiveness!

Mark Garver
S/V It’s Good


On Jun 9, 2021, at 11:55 AM, eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:



I was asked by a crewmember to poll the group to find out what Amel owners used

and recommended for seasickness.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 


JOHN HAYES
 

 Scopaderm a patch that sticks to the skin behind the ear and available at pharmacies in NZ is excellent for crew afflicted by sea sickness . It’s not cheap at about NZ $25 for 2 patches. You wear both. Does not make users drowsy.  I don’t use myself but always keep some on board for use when someone on board is afflicted 

John Hayes 
Nga Waka SN 61
Wellington NZ

On 10/06/2021, at 4:55 AM, eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:



I was asked by a crewmember to poll the group to find out what Amel owners used

and recommended for seasickness.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 


Paul Harries
 

FYI
Apparently NASA has in past mandated use of scopolamine patches behind the ear for all space crew, it is used on one side at a time. I do not know how long this policy was in place.
NASA apparently selected scopolamine patches for being the best anti motion sickness medication with lowest side effects.


--
Paul Harries
Prospective Amel Buyer


Germain Jean-Pierre
 

When doing aerobatic training in the RCAF, we could use Scopolamine patches. 

Luckily, I never needed one even when surrounded by very sick people. I am lucky. 

Jean-Pierre Germain, Eleuthera, SM007, NZ


On 10/06/2021, at 6:08 AM, JOHN HAYES <johnhayes862@...> wrote:


 Scopaderm a patch that sticks to the skin behind the ear and available at pharmacies in NZ is excellent for crew afflicted by sea sickness . It’s not cheap at about NZ $25 for 2 patches. You wear both. Does not make users drowsy.  I don’t use myself but always keep some on board for use when someone on board is afflicted 

John Hayes 
Nga Waka SN 61
Wellington NZ

On 10/06/2021, at 4:55 AM, eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:



I was asked by a crewmember to poll the group to find out what Amel owners used

and recommended for seasickness.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 


 

Paul,

We have an Amel Group member Super Maramu owner who is an Astronaut, a Professor of Cardiology, and was part of a Space Station crew. Additionally, he is one of the smartest people I have ever met. I will ask him and get back to you.

Bill
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Wed, Jun 9, 2021 at 1:41 PM Paul Harries via groups.io <Pharries=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
FYI
Apparently NASA has in past mandated use of scopolamine patches behind the ear for all space crew, it is used on one side at a time. I do not know how long this policy was in place.
NASA apparently selected scopolamine patches for being the best anti motion sickness medication with lowest side effects.


--
Paul Harries
Prospective Amel Buyer


 

The helm!

Tell crew members to tell you when they feel the least bit queasy, then put them in the helm seat and have them steer to something on the horizon, even if it is a cloud...of course, you'll have to adjust their focus when the cloud moves.

This works. Have you ever known a driver of a car to get car sick?

Bill
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Wed, Jun 9, 2021 at 1:49 PM Germain Jean-Pierre <jp.germain45@...> wrote:
When doing aerobatic training in the RCAF, we could use Scopolamine patches. 

Luckily, I never needed one even when surrounded by very sick people. I am lucky. 

Jean-Pierre Germain, Eleuthera, SM007, NZ


On 10/06/2021, at 6:08 AM, JOHN HAYES <johnhayes862@...> wrote:


 Scopaderm a patch that sticks to the skin behind the ear and available at pharmacies in NZ is excellent for crew afflicted by sea sickness . It’s not cheap at about NZ $25 for 2 patches. You wear both. Does not make users drowsy.  I don’t use myself but always keep some on board for use when someone on board is afflicted 

John Hayes 
Nga Waka SN 61
Wellington NZ

On 10/06/2021, at 4:55 AM, eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:



I was asked by a crewmember to poll the group to find out what Amel owners used

and recommended for seasickness.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 


Eric Freedman
 

Bill,

Please ask him if he ever met Dr David Dickman.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io On Behalf Of CW Bill Rouse
Sent: Wednesday, June 09, 2021 5:05 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io Notification <main@amelyachtowners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Seasickness cures and medication

 

Paul,

 

We have an Amel Group member Super Maramu owner who is an Astronaut, a Professor of Cardiology, and was part of a Space Station crew. Additionally, he is one of the smartest people I have ever met. I will ask him and get back to you.

 

Bill

Image removed by sender.

CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School

Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 

Image removed by sender.Image removed by sender.Image removed by sender.

 

View My Training Calendar

Image removed by sender.

 

 

On Wed, Jun 9, 2021 at 1:41 PM Paul Harries via groups.io <Pharries=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

FYI

Apparently NASA has in past mandated use of scopolamine patches behind the ear for all space crew, it is used on one side at a time. I do not know how long this policy was in place.

NASA apparently selected scopolamine patches for being the best anti motion sickness medication with lowest side effects.


--
Paul Harries
Prospective Amel Buyer


Karl & Deborah Windahl
 

Tempting the fates, but I've been lucky to never have experienced sea sickness. My wife, however, can get sick at dock and has had no problems when taking Bonine. She does get a little sleepy but nothing like with Dramamine. 
Karl Windahl
Maramu #258 "Have Fun"



On Wed, Jun 9, 2021, 12:55 PM eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:

I was asked by a crewmember to poll the group to find out what Amel owners used

and recommended for seasickness.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 


Brent Cameron
 

I used to teach aerobatics myself and was never much affected no matter the motion. Same went for flight in IMC (clouds). Boats on the other hand can get me rarely. I’m not good with sitting there jigging on deep sea fishing fishing boats where I’m exposed to the diesel exhaust or on sailboats l when I lose sight of the horizon and the boat is yawing down waves (that motion has nothing to do with flying and i guess that I’m not used to it and it can do me in until about day 3-4 and then I’m fine.). It’s funny but I always seem to get it for about a day at the evening of day 2 if it’s going to happen to me on a passage. If I make it past that, I’m fine. 

Anyway,  I’ve tried just about everything and I’ve found that:
  1) Gravol (Dimenhydrinate) - works only when I have so much that  I’m asleep.  
  2) Bonine - if taken before I leave and regularly, it can stave off the effects unless it’s really bad out there. 
  3) Elastic Sea sick Wrist Bands - I guess I’m too sceptical for them to work for me
  4) Electric Sea Sick Wrist Bands - Ditto and I’ve wound the voltage right up to the point they make me jump. 
  5) Scopalomine - Doesn’t seem to stave off Day 2/3 effects for me but do note that you really need to wash your hands well after touching these as it will completely dilate your pupils and scare the hell out of your friends and family.   I wish it worked for me as it is the easiest of the lot (well except for those wrist band things) and has the least side effects. 
 6) Sturgeron (Cinnarizine) - used by the  Royal Navy but it has significant potential side effects so is not sold in North America (but you can get it in the Caribbean and Mexico). This works perfectly for me but I only ever take it when I know it’s going to be rough and at day 2 and only until day 4. The problem with it is that it can bring on Parkinson’s if you are so inclined to get it.  Some estimates say that more than 15% of all Parkinson’s cases were associated with longer term use of this so I’m really careful with it (and have no family history of it). It doesn’t make me drowsy but it can I’m told.  

Once you get sick, time will be the only cure IMHO. Bill’s suggestion works great during the day when you can see clouds or islands and the horizon but when you lose those, lie flat and near the centre of the boat to minimize motions.  It’s funny with me. I can take rolling and pitching all day long without so much as a twinge but throw in a few unexpected yaws (slipping turn from side to side without banking) and my tummy starts to turn.   

After 3-4 days at sea, it always gets better for me and I lose any effect no matter the motion. Doesn’t help when you are suffering though as you just want to die and get it all over with. :-). 

On my last passage, we found that if we lay down the moment we started to feel something and then popped up for quick tasks and then back down right away, we could stave off any effects without medication.  

Those who never get sick have my admiration, those who always do, have my deepest sympathies.  

Brent

On Jun 9, 2021, 5:10 PM -0400, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...>, wrote:
The helm!

Tell crew members to tell you when they feel the least bit queasy, then put them in the helm seat and have them steer to something on the horizon, even if it is a cloud...of course, you'll have to adjust their focus when the cloud moves.

This works. Have you ever known a driver of a car to get car sick?

Bill
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Wed, Jun 9, 2021 at 1:49 PM Germain Jean-Pierre <jp.germain45@...> wrote:
When doing aerobatic training in the RCAF, we could use Scopolamine patches. 

Luckily, I never needed one even when surrounded by very sick people. I am lucky. 

Jean-Pierre Germain, Eleuthera, SM007, NZ


On 10/06/2021, at 6:08 AM, JOHN HAYES <johnhayes862@...> wrote:


 Scopaderm a patch that sticks to the skin behind the ear and available at pharmacies in NZ is excellent for crew afflicted by sea sickness . It’s not cheap at about NZ $25 for 2 patches. You wear both. Does not make users drowsy.  I don’t use myself but always keep some on board for use when someone on board is afflicted 

John Hayes 
Nga Waka SN 61
Wellington NZ

On 10/06/2021, at 4:55 AM, eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:



I was asked by a crewmember to poll the group to find out what Amel owners used

and recommended for seasickness.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 


--
Brent Cameron

Future Amel Owner & Amel Owner Registry Moderator

Oro-Medonte, Ontario, Canada


Lee-Ann Strelzow
 

Lasts for a week or so    So not a bad idea and not so expensive when you just use one.  Also you need to wear a few days before to make it effective.  Available in USA too.
Cheers
Lee Ann

We do not learn from experience. We learn from reflecting on experience."


On Jun 9, 2021, at 2:10 PM, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:


The helm!

Tell crew members to tell you when they feel the least bit queasy, then put them in the helm seat and have them steer to something on the horizon, even if it is a cloud...of course, you'll have to adjust their focus when the cloud moves.

This works. Have you ever known a driver of a car to get car sick?

Bill
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Wed, Jun 9, 2021 at 1:49 PM Germain Jean-Pierre <jp.germain45@...> wrote:
When doing aerobatic training in the RCAF, we could use Scopolamine patches. 

Luckily, I never needed one even when surrounded by very sick people. I am lucky. 

Jean-Pierre Germain, Eleuthera, SM007, NZ


On 10/06/2021, at 6:08 AM, JOHN HAYES <johnhayes862@...> wrote:


 Scopaderm a patch that sticks to the skin behind the ear and available at pharmacies in NZ is excellent for crew afflicted by sea sickness . It’s not cheap at about NZ $25 for 2 patches. You wear both. Does not make users drowsy.  I don’t use myself but always keep some on board for use when someone on board is afflicted 

John Hayes 
Nga Waka SN 61
Wellington NZ

On 10/06/2021, at 4:55 AM, eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:



I was asked by a crewmember to poll the group to find out what Amel owners used

and recommended for seasickness.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 


Giorgio Ardrizzi
 

I have been using Biodramina Cafeina for years and I am very happy. It is the usual Dramamina type pill, but it contains caffeine which completely eliminates sleepiness.  The problem is finding it, because to my knowledge it is only sold in Spain. You can also buy it online.  On average it lasts 6/8 hours.

With regard to the Scopolamine patch, I advice once applied, to cover it with a paper patch. If inadvertently touches the patch and then the eyes, causes the complete opening of the pupil for many hours.
Being the Scopolamine a drug, for years in Italy, my nation, sale is prohibited.

Giorgio Ardrizzi
sy Saudade III
Sharki #1 - 1980
in Le Marin, Martinique


Marcel Tromp
 

Lie down on your belly , relax the muscles but have a bucket nearby! No meds!


On Thu, 10 Jun. 2021 at 16:29, Giorgio Ardrizzi
<giorgio.ardrizzi@...> wrote:
I have been using Biodramina Cafeina for years and I am very happy. It is the usual Dramamina type pill, but it contains caffeine which completely eliminates sleepiness.  The problem is finding it, because to my knowledge it is only sold in Spain. You can also buy it online.  On average it lasts 6/8 hours.

With regard to the Scopolamine patch, I advice once applied, to cover it with a paper patch. If inadvertently touches the patch and then the eyes, causes the complete opening of the pupil for many hours.
Being the Scopolamine a drug, for years in Italy, my nation, sale is prohibited.

Giorgio Ardrizzi
sy Saudade III
Sharki #1 - 1980
in Le Marin, Martinique


Alan Leslie
 

We take Stugeron tablets for the first 2 days. It makes me a bit drowsy, but after two days all is fine...and if out for 6 months or so, never have to take it again.
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


CARINA HAMMARLUND
 

We use scopolamine patches which works well and we also tried the sea sickness googles used by the marine.
you look funny wearing them but it really helps when you need to go down for galley work etc
--
Carina
SV Ultimo
Amel 54 No 165


Randall Walker
 

Number one cure, stay on land.
If that is not possible I recommend unsalted soda crackers and flat Canada Dry ginger ale.
All my friends are not so nice and just say “suck it up buttercup” lol

Randall
A54#56
At anchor in Grenada 

On Wed, Jun 9, 2021 at 12:55 eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:

I was asked by a crewmember to poll the group to find out what Amel owners used

and recommended for seasickness.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 


Joerg Esdorn
 

Another vote for sturgeon.   I hadn’t heard about the long term bad effects but I’ve never had a crew who took it get seasick or have side effects.   I have recently had a case of a crew member who didn’t think it was necessary to take it.  Bad idea.  Throwing up for hours and serious dehydration resulted.  If you start vomiting not even water stays down.  So I’ve now bought some suppositories to deal with that situation.  I hope I will never have to use them.  


Joerg Esdorn
A55 Kincsem
Vigo


Doug Smith
 

From the perspective of a US emergency physician, here are my thoughts and experiences on the medications we have used and continue to use.

 

Dramamine, Antivert, Meclizine, and Bonine are all the same drug, just in different milligram amounts of the drug meclizine.  12.5 mg, 25 mg, up to 50 mg at a time for severe symptoms.  Best if taken early, before the vomiting occurs, and when symptoms are starting to take hold. They come in tablets or dissolvable pills, and are very well tolerated in most people.  Importantly, in the US they are all over the counter.  It is ok to break a 25 mg tablet in half.

For those in the US, and especially for those traveling with kids, most US doctors will give you a prescription for Zofran, or Ondansetron, which works exceptionally well for the vomiting and has almost no side effects at all. Just explain the purpose and I can’t imagine a doctor who would decline. The dose of Ondansetron is 4 mg but it can be tolerated in doses up to 16 mg and 32 mg for adults.  Most of the time 4 mg is enough.  Very effective.

We carry on board our boat, a healthy supply of these two drugs, Zofran and Meclizine.

Scopolamine patches are very effective, and I carry them, but haven’t used them a ton since the others work so well, with less side effects. The nice part of this one is that if you start to get the side effects that are uncomfortable, you can just remove the patches and they will go away with some Benadryl or diphenhydramine.

We also carry Compazine and Phenergan on board, but similar to scopolamine, the risk of side effects are slightly higher. These work well, if the vomiting has already started, and can be given rectally as well, but the rectal suppositories need to be kept cool to avoid melting. You manage these side effects with Benadryl as well.

 

In order of preference,

For adults, Meclizine, Ondansetron, Scopolomine, and then lastly Phenergan or Compazine whichever is on board.

For kids under about 10 years of age, ondansetron, ondansetron, ondansetron.

The other points are well made about watching the horizon, and staying topside.  Ginger snaps, or ginger ale are nice mild remedies as ginger has some anti nausea properties. We try to encourage liquids in small sips mouthful every 5- 10 minutes, as soon as the medications take effect and then to encourage dry snacks like granola, or crackers, while the meds are working.

 

Doug Smith

S/V Aventura, Amel 54-113

White Point Marina, Kinsale VA USA

 

From: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of eric freedman <kimberlite@...>
Reply-To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Date: Wednesday, June 9, 2021 at 12:55 PM
To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Seasickness cures and medication

 

I was asked by a crewmember to poll the group to find out what Amel owners used

and recommended for seasickness.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 


Thomas Peacock
 

One of the problems with nausea and vomiting is that while the end-result is the same (first you’re afraid you’re going to die, then you’re afraid that you won’t), the causes of N & V are manifold. Stomach viruses, food poisoning, post-anesthesia, chemotherapy, motion, pain, bowel obstruction; the list goes on. But, what works for one cause does not necessarily work for another cause.

I’m a retired oncologist, and have unfortunately had many patients who have suffered severely with chemotherapy induced N & V. I have witnessed huge advances in managing this: first metoclopramide (Reglan in the US), ondansetron (Zofran in the US), and Aprepitant (Emend in the US). Due to these drugs, the vast majority of people who undergo treatment today experience little or no N & V. 

Being a sailor who does suffer somewhat from motion sickness, I have also followed these newer drugs in the hopes that they might benefit me as well. Unfortunately, none of them really seem to help. That is not my personal experience talking: there have been well-run published studies looking for benefit from them for motion sickness, and unfortunately, they just don’t work. In addition, while generally well-tolerated, they are not entirely free of side effects. The most noticeable one for ondansetron is constipation. While most drugs list constipation as a side-effect, for ondansetron it is real. That’s already a potential problem on any blue-water voyage, especially in rough seas where the desire to visit the head is oftentimes overcome by the fear of sitting on the pot in a rolling boat. We do not carry these drugs on board.

So, I agree with most others on this forum:  meclizine (Antivert, Bonine), absolutely worth of try. Scopolomine, also helps some people. Dimenhydrinate (Dramamine), also can help others. They can all cause dry mouth, and drowsiness; not to be taken with alcohol. I have tried the electric bracelets, my jury is still out. On another note, I have read a German study that showed some modest benefit from Vitamin C, 2 gram dose a day. Pretty safe. And, I’m in total agreement for any form of ginger.

Unfortunately, nothing really helps A LOT. Maybe just enough so that you can function. Or maybe not. 

Tom Peacock
SM 240 Aletes
Chesapeake Bay
But I’m a landlubber for many more weeks with a broken leg

On Jun 9, 2021, at 12:55 PM, eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:

I was asked by a crewmember to poll the group to find out what Amel owners used 
and recommended for seasickness.
Fair Winds
Eric
Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376
 


--
Tom Peacock
SM 240 Aletes
Chesapeake Bay


Eric Freedman
 

Did you try stugeron?

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io On Behalf Of Thomas Peacock
Sent: Friday, June 11, 2021 2:25 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Seasickness cures and medication

 

One of the problems with nausea and vomiting is that while the end-result is the same (first you’re afraid you’re going to die, then you’re afraid that you won’t), the causes of N & V are manifold. Stomach viruses, food poisoning, post-anesthesia, chemotherapy, motion, pain, bowel obstruction; the list goes on. But, what works for one cause does not necessarily work for another cause.

 

I’m a retired oncologist, and have unfortunately had many patients who have suffered severely with chemotherapy induced N & V. I have witnessed huge advances in managing this: first metoclopramide (Reglan in the US), ondansetron (Zofran in the US), and Aprepitant (Emend in the US). Due to these drugs, the vast majority of people who undergo treatment today experience little or no N & V. 

 

Being a sailor who does suffer somewhat from motion sickness, I have also followed these newer drugs in the hopes that they might benefit me as well. Unfortunately, none of them really seem to help. That is not my personal experience talking: there have been well-run published studies looking for benefit from them for motion sickness, and unfortunately, they just don’t work. In addition, while generally well-tolerated, they are not entirely free of side effects. The most noticeable one for ondansetron is constipation. While most drugs list constipation as a side-effect, for ondansetron it is real. That’s already a potential problem on any blue-water voyage, especially in rough seas where the desire to visit the head is oftentimes overcome by the fear of sitting on the pot in a rolling boat. We do not carry these drugs on board.

 

So, I agree with most others on this forum:  meclizine (Antivert, Bonine), absolutely worth of try. Scopolomine, also helps some people. Dimenhydrinate (Dramamine), also can help others. They can all cause dry mouth, and drowsiness; not to be taken with alcohol. I have tried the electric bracelets, my jury is still out. On another note, I have read a German study that showed some modest benefit from Vitamin C, 2 gram dose a day. Pretty safe. And, I’m in total agreement for any form of ginger.

 

Unfortunately, nothing really helps A LOT. Maybe just enough so that you can function. Or maybe not. 

 

Tom Peacock

SM 240 Aletes

Chesapeake Bay

But I’m a landlubber for many more weeks with a broken leg



On Jun 9, 2021, at 12:55 PM, eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:

 

I was asked by a crewmember to poll the group to find out what Amel owners used 

and recommended for seasickness.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 


--
Tom Peacock
SM 240 Aletes
Chesapeake Bay