[Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Anchor Locker


VLADIMIR SONSEV
 

Moldy pywood can be saved. Just clean it, dry well and apply penetrating epoxy. Follow instructions. Your can add a layer of fiberglass on top if needed. 

Vladimir
SM 345 "LIFE IS GOOD"

On Feb 21, 2018 05:01, "greatketch@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Gerhard,


This has been a popular topic recently.  It seems that this year many Super Maramus (mine included) have reached the age where the plywood in the chain locker reached the end of its useful life.  The only reason I can see for not fully encapsulating the plywood in the chain locker is just manufacturing expedience. There are very few places where Amel took shortcuts, so I guess I can forgive them this one.  Where our wood was coated, it was coated with glass and resin, not simply paint.

If the plywood is "moldy" it is almost certainly past the point where it can be saved, although others with more wooden boat experience than I might have some useful suggestions.

We replaced the horizontal plywood in our boat completely, and ground off a layer or two from the vertical bulkhead down to hard, dry wood before covering it with fiberglass and resin.  If you dig back a few months in the forum archives you'll find a lot of discussion about the various approaches to this project.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Freeport, Bahamas



---In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, <no_reply@...> wrote :


I take all the chain out every year to clean the anchor locker and as has been noted on previous posts, the plywood ceiling is always mouldy.  Does anybody know why the anchor locker is painted halfway up with white paint and the rest of the fiberglass is left bare and the plywood ceiling is left unpainted?  Has anybody painted the sides and especially the plywood ceiling?  If so, what paint was used?  Does anybody know what the existing white paint is?


Gerhard Hoffmann

Pepino SM381

Greece

 




On Feb 21, 2018 05:01, "greatketch@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Gerhard,


This has been a popular topic recently.  It seems that this year many Super Maramus (mine included) have reached the age where the plywood in the chain locker reached the end of its useful life.  The only reason I can see for not fully encapsulating the plywood in the chain locker is just manufacturing expedience. There are very few places where Amel took shortcuts, so I guess I can forgive them this one.  Where our wood was coated, it was coated with glass and resin, not simply paint.

If the plywood is "moldy" it is almost certainly past the point where it can be saved, although others with more wooden boat experience than I might have some useful suggestions.

We replaced the horizontal plywood in our boat completely, and ground off a layer or two from the vertical bulkhead down to hard, dry wood before covering it with fiberglass and resin.  If you dig back a few months in the forum archives you'll find a lot of discussion about the various approaches to this project.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Freeport, Bahamas



---In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, <no_reply@...> wrote :


I take all the chain out every year to clean the anchor locker and as has been noted on previous posts, the plywood ceiling is always mouldy.  Does anybody know why the anchor locker is painted halfway up with white paint and the rest of the fiberglass is left bare and the plywood ceiling is left unpainted?  Has anybody painted the sides and especially the plywood ceiling?  If so, what paint was used?  Does anybody know what the existing white paint is?


Gerhard Hoffmann

Pepino SM381

Greece

 



James Studdart
 

Out of curiosity, does penetrating epoxy work on the underside of the plywood (working against gravity). The plywood will draw in some I expect, but is it enough?

Cheers,
James.
SeaBean SM344
Tahiti, FP

On Wed, Feb 21, 2018 at 05:56 Vladimir Sonsev sonsev52@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Moldy pywood can be saved. Just clean it, dry well and apply penetrating epoxy. Follow instructions. Your can add a layer of fiberglass on top if needed. 

Vladimir
SM 345 "LIFE IS GOOD"


On Feb 21, 2018 05:01, "greatketch@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Gerhard,


This has been a popular topic recently.  It seems that this year many Super Maramus (mine included) have reached the age where the plywood in the chain locker reached the end of its useful life.  The only reason I can see for not fully encapsulating the plywood in the chain locker is just manufacturing expedience. There are very few places where Amel took shortcuts, so I guess I can forgive them this one.  Where our wood was coated, it was coated with glass and resin, not simply paint.

If the plywood is "moldy" it is almost certainly past the point where it can be saved, although others with more wooden boat experience than I might have some useful suggestions.

We replaced the horizontal plywood in our boat completely, and ground off a layer or two from the vertical bulkhead down to hard, dry wood before covering it with fiberglass and resin.  If you dig back a few months in the forum archives you'll find a lot of discussion about the various approaches to this project.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Freeport, Bahamas



---In amelyachtowners@..., <no_reply@...> wrote :


I take all the chain out every year to clean the anchor locker and as has been noted on previous posts, the plywood ceiling is always mouldy.  Does anybody know why the anchor locker is painted halfway up with white paint and the rest of the fiberglass is left bare and the plywood ceiling is left unpainted?  Has anybody painted the sides and especially the plywood ceiling?  If so, what paint was used?  Does anybody know what the existing white paint is?


Gerhard Hoffmann

Pepino SM381

Greece

 




On Feb 21, 2018 05:01, "greatketch@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Gerhard,


This has been a popular topic recently.  It seems that this year many Super Maramus (mine included) have reached the age where the plywood in the chain locker reached the end of its useful life.  The only reason I can see for not fully encapsulating the plywood in the chain locker is just manufacturing expedience. There are very few places where Amel took shortcuts, so I guess I can forgive them this one.  Where our wood was coated, it was coated with glass and resin, not simply paint.

If the plywood is "moldy" it is almost certainly past the point where it can be saved, although others with more wooden boat experience than I might have some useful suggestions.

We replaced the horizontal plywood in our boat completely, and ground off a layer or two from the vertical bulkhead down to hard, dry wood before covering it with fiberglass and resin.  If you dig back a few months in the forum archives you'll find a lot of discussion about the various approaches to this project.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Freeport, Bahamas



---In amelyachtowners@..., <no_reply@...> wrote :


I take all the chain out every year to clean the anchor locker and as has been noted on previous posts, the plywood ceiling is always mouldy.  Does anybody know why the anchor locker is painted halfway up with white paint and the rest of the fiberglass is left bare and the plywood ceiling is left unpainted?  Has anybody painted the sides and especially the plywood ceiling?  If so, what paint was used?  Does anybody know what the existing white paint is?


Gerhard Hoffmann

Pepino SM381

Greece

 



VLADIMIR SONSEV
 

Yes it will work against gravity because of capillary effect. Water goes up in the trees because of capillary effect. I would roll it with a paint roller. It is very important to dry it well first. 

Vladimir
SM 345 "LIFE IS GOOD"

On Feb 21, 2018 15:40, "James Studdart james.studdart@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Out of curiosity, does penetrating epoxy work on the underside of the plywood (working against gravity). The plywood will draw in some I expect, but is it enough?

Cheers,
James.
SeaBean SM344
Tahiti, FP

On Wed, Feb 21, 2018 at 05:56 Vladimir Sonsev sonsev52@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
 

Moldy pywood can be saved. Just clean it, dry well and apply penetrating epoxy. Follow instructions. Your can add a layer of fiberglass on top if needed. 

Vladimir
SM 345 "LIFE IS GOOD"


On Feb 21, 2018 05:01, "greatketch@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
 

Gerhard,


This has been a popular topic recently.  It seems that this year many Super Maramus (mine included) have reached the age where the plywood in the chain locker reached the end of its useful life.  The only reason I can see for not fully encapsulating the plywood in the chain locker is just manufacturing expedience. There are very few places where Amel took shortcuts, so I guess I can forgive them this one.  Where our wood was coated, it was coated with glass and resin, not simply paint.

If the plywood is "moldy" it is almost certainly past the point where it can be saved, although others with more wooden boat experience than I might have some useful suggestions.

We replaced the horizontal plywood in our boat completely, and ground off a layer or two from the vertical bulkhead down to hard, dry wood before covering it with fiberglass and resin.  If you dig back a few months in the forum archives you'll find a lot of discussion about the various approaches to this project.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Freeport, Bahamas



---In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, <no_reply@...> wrote :


I take all the chain out every year to clean the anchor locker and as has been noted on previous posts, the plywood ceiling is always mouldy.  Does anybody know why the anchor locker is painted halfway up with white paint and the rest of the fiberglass is left bare and the plywood ceiling is left unpainted?  Has anybody painted the sides and especially the plywood ceiling?  If so, what paint was used?  Does anybody know what the existing white paint is?


Gerhard Hoffmann

Pepino SM381

Greece

 




On Feb 21, 2018 05:01, "greatketch@yahoo..com [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
 

Gerhard,


This has been a popular topic recently.  It seems that this year many Super Maramus (mine included) have reached the age where the plywood in the chain locker reached the end of its useful life.  The only reason I can see for not fully encapsulating the plywood in the chain locker is just manufacturing expedience. There are very few places where Amel took shortcuts, so I guess I can forgive them this one.  Where our wood was coated, it was coated with glass and resin, not simply paint.

If the plywood is "moldy" it is almost certainly past the point where it can be saved, although others with more wooden boat experience than I might have some useful suggestions.

We replaced the horizontal plywood in our boat completely, and ground off a layer or two from the vertical bulkhead down to hard, dry wood before covering it with fiberglass and resin.  If you dig back a few months in the forum archives you'll find a lot of discussion about the various approaches to this project.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Freeport, Bahamas



---In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, <no_reply@...> wrote :


I take all the chain out every year to clean the anchor locker and as has been noted on previous posts, the plywood ceiling is always mouldy.  Does anybody know why the anchor locker is painted halfway up with white paint and the rest of the fiberglass is left bare and the plywood ceiling is left unpainted?  Has anybody painted the sides and especially the plywood ceiling?  If so, what paint was used?  Does anybody know what the existing white paint is?


Gerhard Hoffmann

Pepino SM381

Greece

 




James Alton
 

James,

   There are a lot of different kinds of mold, some are just superficial and some indicate that the wood is being consumed.  You can try poking the wood in areas with an ice pick to see if there is any unusual softness which would indicate dry rot..which is actually misnomer since some moisture is required for rot to progress.

   If the wood is dry, it will certainly absorb epoxy regardless of the orientation of the application.   Epoxy can do a great job protecting wood from absorbing moisture but if the wood is already wet (wood can appear dry on the surface but there still be a lot of moisture deeper into the wood) you will be sealing the moisture in which can in some cases accelerate the deterioration.   Think of the way the wood core in a deck with fibreglass on both sides of it will rot if the core gets wet.  The moisture can enter through a small hole but due to the fibreglass it cannot easily dry back out.   Keep in mind that with plywood, any moisture has to cross multiple glue lines to get out so the drying from the bottom could take a long time to complete if you want to go that route.  

  Another option would be to treat the wood with a water borne fungicide which actually works best if the wood is already wet.  The borate products work pretty well in preventing or slowing rot and are used for instance in the cellulose insulation used in attics to keep the paper from rotting or bugs eating it, while still being pretty safe for humans living in the house.  One such product that I have some experience with is called Timbor, which is a white powder that is mixed with water and can then be applied via brush or spray.  The product is essentially odourless and cleans up with water.  It will leave a white residue if allowed to dry on a surface but can be removed with soap and water.  Given time and enough applications the borate can completely penetrate the plywood and should slow  deterioration of the wood.  The anchor locker is a pretty harsh environment for wood due to the continual dampness so if I ever have to rebuild my own locker, I will consider my options to eliminate the wood panels.

   The cleaning that you are doing is certainly going to help.  I try to pull my anchor chain out each time I am in a marina, rinse and dry the locker.   I just lay a couple square rubber pads on the deck and pile it up close to the hawse pipe, I don’t bother stretching it out.  I also keep the chain door open to vent as much as I can so that things can dry inside the locker.  Good ventilation will help more than anything to reduce mildew and rot of the wood.

Best,

James

SV Sueño
Maramu #220

On Feb 21, 2018, at 2:39 PM, James Studdart james.studdart@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Out of curiosity, does penetrating epoxy work on the underside of the plywood (working against gravity). The plywood will draw in some I expect, but is it enough?

Cheers,
James.
SeaBean SM344
Tahiti, FP

On Wed, Feb 21, 2018 at 05:56 Vladimir Sonsev sonsev52@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Moldy pywood can be saved. Just clean it, dry well and apply penetrating epoxy. Follow instructions. Your can add a layer of fiberglass on top if needed. 

Vladimir 
SM 345 "LIFE IS GOOD"



On Feb 21, 2018 05:01, "greatketch@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Gerhard,


This has been a popular topic recently.  It seems that this year many Super Maramus (mine included) have reached the age where the plywood in the chain locker reached the end of its useful life.  The only reason I can see for not fully encapsulating the plywood in the chain locker is just manufacturing expedience. There are very few places where Amel took shortcuts, so I guess I can forgive them this one.  Where our wood was coated, it was coated with glass and resin, not simply paint.

If the plywood is "moldy" it is almost certainly past the point where it can be saved, although others with more wooden boat experience than I might have some useful suggestions.

We replaced the horizontal plywood in our boat completely, and ground off a layer or two from the vertical bulkhead down to hard, dry wood before covering it with fiberglass and resin.  If you dig back a few months in the forum archives you'll find a lot of discussion about the various approaches to this project.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Freeport, Bahamas



---In amelyachtowners@..., <no_reply@...> wrote :


I take all the chain out every year to clean the anchor locker and as has been noted on previous posts, the plywood ceiling is always mouldy.  Does anybody know why the anchor locker is painted halfway up with white paint and the rest of the fiberglass is left bare and the plywood ceiling is left unpainted?  Has anybody painted the sides and especially the plywood ceiling?  If so, what paint was used?  Does anybody know what the existing white paint is?


Gerhard Hoffmann

Pepino SM381

Greece

 






On Feb 21, 2018 05:01, "greatketch@yahoo..com [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Gerhard,


This has been a popular topic recently.  It seems that this year many Super Maramus (mine included) have reached the age where the plywood in the chain locker reached the end of its useful life.  The only reason I can see for not fully encapsulating the plywood in the chain locker is just manufacturing expedience. There are very few places where Amel took shortcuts, so I guess I can forgive them this one.  Where our wood was coated, it was coated with glass and resin, not simply paint.

If the plywood is "moldy" it is almost certainly past the point where it can be saved, although others with more wooden boat experience than I might have some useful suggestions.

We replaced the horizontal plywood in our boat completely, and ground off a layer or two from the vertical bulkhead down to hard, dry wood before covering it with fiberglass and resin.  If you dig back a few months in the forum archives you'll find a lot of discussion about the various approaches to this project.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Freeport, Bahamas



---In amelyachtowners@..., <no_reply@...> wrote :


I take all the chain out every year to clean the anchor locker and as has been noted on previous posts, the plywood ceiling is always mouldy.  Does anybody know why the anchor locker is painted halfway up with white paint and the rest of the fiberglass is left bare and the plywood ceiling is left unpainted?  Has anybody painted the sides and especially the plywood ceiling?  If so, what paint was used?  Does anybody know what the existing white paint is?


Gerhard Hoffmann

Pepino SM381

Greece

 








James Studdart
 

Good to know. Thanks Vladimir. It seems prudent to keep an eye on the locker and then perform this at any sign it’s not in the best shape.

Cheers,
James.
SeaBean #344
Tahiti, FP

On Wed, Feb 21, 2018 at 15:20 Vladimir Sonsev sonsev52@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Yes it will work against gravity because of capillary effect. Water goes up in the trees because of capillary effect. I would roll it with a paint roller. It is very important to dry it well first. 

Vladimir

SM 345 "LIFE IS GOOD"

On Feb 21, 2018 15:40, "James Studdart james.studdart@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Out of curiosity, does penetrating epoxy work on the underside of the plywood (working against gravity). The plywood will draw in some I expect, but is it enough?

Cheers,
James.
SeaBean SM344
Tahiti, FP

On Wed, Feb 21, 2018 at 05:56 Vladimir Sonsev sonsev52@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Moldy pywood can be saved. Just clean it, dry well and apply penetrating epoxy. Follow instructions. Your can add a layer of fiberglass on top if needed. 

Vladimir
SM 345 "LIFE IS GOOD"


On Feb 21, 2018 05:01, "greatketch@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Gerhard,


This has been a popular topic recently.  It seems that this year many Super Maramus (mine included) have reached the age where the plywood in the chain locker reached the end of its useful life.  The only reason I can see for not fully encapsulating the plywood in the chain locker is just manufacturing expedience. There are very few places where Amel took shortcuts, so I guess I can forgive them this one.  Where our wood was coated, it was coated with glass and resin, not simply paint.

If the plywood is "moldy" it is almost certainly past the point where it can be saved, although others with more wooden boat experience than I might have some useful suggestions.

We replaced the horizontal plywood in our boat completely, and ground off a layer or two from the vertical bulkhead down to hard, dry wood before covering it with fiberglass and resin.  If you dig back a few months in the forum archives you'll find a lot of discussion about the various approaches to this project.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Freeport, Bahamas



---In amelyachtowners@..., <no_reply@...> wrote :


I take all the chain out every year to clean the anchor locker and as has been noted on previous posts, the plywood ceiling is always mouldy.  Does anybody know why the anchor locker is painted halfway up with white paint and the rest of the fiberglass is left bare and the plywood ceiling is left unpainted?  Has anybody painted the sides and especially the plywood ceiling?  If so, what paint was used?  Does anybody know what the existing white paint is?


Gerhard Hoffmann

Pepino SM381

Greece

 




On Feb 21, 2018 05:01, "greatketch@yahoo..com [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Gerhard,


This has been a popular topic recently.  It seems that this year many Super Maramus (mine included) have reached the age where the plywood in the chain locker reached the end of its useful life.  The only reason I can see for not fully encapsulating the plywood in the chain locker is just manufacturing expedience. There are very few places where Amel took shortcuts, so I guess I can forgive them this one.  Where our wood was coated, it was coated with glass and resin, not simply paint.

If the plywood is "moldy" it is almost certainly past the point where it can be saved, although others with more wooden boat experience than I might have some useful suggestions.

We replaced the horizontal plywood in our boat completely, and ground off a layer or two from the vertical bulkhead down to hard, dry wood before covering it with fiberglass and resin.  If you dig back a few months in the forum archives you'll find a lot of discussion about the various approaches to this project.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Freeport, Bahamas



---In amelyachtowners@..., <no_reply@...> wrote :


I take all the chain out every year to clean the anchor locker and as has been noted on previous posts, the plywood ceiling is always mouldy.  Does anybody know why the anchor locker is painted halfway up with white paint and the rest of the fiberglass is left bare and the plywood ceiling is left unpainted?  Has anybody painted the sides and especially the plywood ceiling?  If so, what paint was used?  Does anybody know what the existing white paint is?


Gerhard Hoffmann

Pepino SM381

Greece

 



rossirossix4
 
Edited

Wanted to reinforce James's comment where he says "I try to pull my anchor chain out each time I am in a marina, rinse and dry the locker....I also keep the chain door open to vent as much as I can so that things can dry inside the locker."  In addition to keeping down wood rot it also prevents chain rust and I am willing to bet that most chain rust occurs in the chain locker when the chain is coated with damp salt for long periods of time.

Securing the chain locker access door can be a challenge .  I was recently running through photos and ran into this photo of a project I completed while we were locked down in Santa Marta, Colombia for 7 weeks about a year ago!

Using re-purposed stainless door stops you can make your locker door easier to position and perhaps it works as an incentive to vent the chain locker or to spray it out after chain is removed and rinsed with fresh water.

Self explanitary project photo is here-- https://photos.app.goo.gl/xrf5V6TP3dL5g9mx7    The door is easy to "hang"  on the opening while you dog down the wooden bar--all while trying to avoid crushing the AC ducting with your elbow!  Best to position and mark the holes of the door stops while the door is correctly positioned and then remove and drill and secure with screws--make sure you buy ones that are tall enough to grab the opening.  You can also add horizontal positioning but it seems unnecessary.

Bob and Suzanne, KAIMI SM429


Thomas Kleman
 

I believe Amel didn't glass the bottom of the bow compartment floor because they couldn't without a door being installed. The floor has a slight contour and fitting a pre glassed piece of plywood into the locker to get the contour right would have been very difficult. I did the bow locker floor/ hawse pipe job a few years ago.

On the rusty chain topic though, one overlooked issue in the chain locker is the bottom grate. On #422 the chain rests atop a non removable grate (a false bottom) and under the grate is the drain fitting leading to the bilge. Only way to clear it is to blow air or water into this fitting from the other side. But that clears it, it doesn't clean it. I made my grate removable by cutting a hole in it when I put in my bow locker door and new floor. I vacuum it periodically from inside the chain locker because it clogs from debris on the chain. Now my chain is never sitting in water inside the chain locker.

Tom Kleman
SV L'ORIENT
SM2K 422
Oahu


Alan Leslie
 

Hi Bob and Suzanne,
That's a great idea!
If I ever get back to Elyse, I'll do that.
I am worried that when / if i do get back on the boat I'll find that the anchor chain is a ball of rust...horror thought.
It's now over a year.
Cheers
Alan
Elyse Sm437


Joe Sciarrino
 

Dear Thomas : 
                           Can you show us some pictures of what a clean chain locker looks like and how you are accessing it 
Thank you in advance 

Sincerely
Indigo Joe 
SM 169


On Mar 9, 2021, at 3:00 PM, Thomas Kleman <lorient422@...> wrote:

I believe Amel didn't glass the bottom of the bow compartment floor because they couldn't without a door being installed. The floor has a slight contour and fitting a pre glassed piece of plywood into the locker to get the contour right would have been very difficult. I did the bow locker floor/ hawse pipe job a few years ago.

On the rusty chain topic though, one overlooked issue in the chain locker is the bottom grate. On #422 the chain rests atop a non removable grate (a false bottom) and under the grate is the drain fitting leading to the bilge. Only way to clear it is to blow air or water into this fitting from the other side. But that clears it, it doesn't clean it. I made my grate removable by cutting a hole in it when I put in my bow locker door and new floor. I vacuum it periodically from inside the chain locker because it clogs from debris on the chain. Now my chain is never sitting in water inside the chain locker.

Tom Kleman
SV L'ORIENT
SM2K 422
Oahu


Thomas Kleman
 

The pictures are already posted from mine and the design of others- check the archives.

Thomas Kleman
SV L'ORIENT
SM2K 422


Craig Briggs
 

Another option for keeping the chain locker vented - louvered cover. Switch back to original solid one when passage making.
Inexpensively done by local cabinet maker.

--
SN68 Sangaris, Tropic Isle Harbor, FL


 

I want to issue a small and maybe insignificant warning about venting the chain locker inside the boat.

Judy and I were aboard someone else's SM several years ago who was venting his chain locker into the boat. Judy is very sensitive to respiratory issues. She had a serious reaction to the mold that was being vented out of the chain locker and into the boat. I know this is fairly rare, but if you or someone aboard has ever had a reaction to airborne mold spores, please do not do this. It took a long time to clear this up.

Bill
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Fri, Mar 12, 2021 at 10:12 AM Craig Briggs via groups.io <sangaris=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Another option for keeping the chain locker vented - louvered cover. Switch back to original solid one when passage making.
Inexpensively done by local cabinet maker.

--
SN68 Sangaris, Tropic Isle Harbor, FL


Mark Garver
 

Bill,

Thank you so much for that, my wife has a super sniffer and things like bleach and other smells impact her for days. You just saved me a boat project and an unhappy wife!

Best,

Mark and Jennifer Garver
S/V It’s Good
SM#105
Gloucester Point, VA

On Mar 12, 2021, at 10:23 AM, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:

I want to issue a small and maybe insignificant warning about venting the chain locker inside the boat.

Judy and I were aboard someone else's SM several years ago who was venting his chain locker into the boat. Judy is very sensitive to respiratory issues. She had a serious reaction to the mold that was being vented out of the chain locker and into the boat. I know this is fairly rare, but if you or someone aboard has ever had a reaction to airborne mold spores, please do not do this. It took a long time to clear this up.

Bill
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Fri, Mar 12, 2021 at 10:12 AM Craig Briggs via groups.io <sangaris=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Another option for keeping the chain locker vented - louvered cover. Switch back to original solid one when passage making.
Inexpensively done by local cabinet maker.
<ChainLockerLouveredDoor3.jpg><ChainLockerLouveredDoor2.jpg><ChainLockerLouveredDoor1.jpg>
--
SN68 Sangaris, Tropic Isle Harbor, FL




Craig Briggs
 

Mold in the chain locker is perhaps a bit of a "chicken-egg" conundrum - vent the locker and don't get mold in the first place. If there is mold, get rid of it and vent to prevent it from forming again.

No need to reconcile yourself to having a sealed "mold holding tank" as your chain locker.

Btw, we periodically "hired" a cruising family's child (7-9 year-olds work well) who fit into the chain locker and could scrub every corner. Also, if you're replacing rotted bow locker floors, that's the ideal time to remediate any old mold and add a vent.
--
SN68 Sangaris, Tropic Isle Harbor, FL


Miles
 

Hi Mark,

I have an ozone generator that fits in the opening to the chain locker. About once a year or more, I run it into the locker for a few hours.  This seems to control the mold and the mold odor and it kills any air-born mold spores.  After this I leave the opening open for ventilation when I am at a dock.  One must be careful of much ozone getting into the boat because ozone is a strong oxidizing  gas and it will age rubber and make it brittle—not good for hoses.  Just enough to smell will kill air-born spores (and any odors).  The ozone itself has a very short half-life.  Half an hour or so is long enough for it to dissipate. 

Regards,

Miles Bidwell, s/y Ladybug, sm 216 in Martinique while I am still in Rhode Island