Topics

[Amel Yacht Owners] Windlass bolt to deck

eric freedman
 

I have had great success over the years removing stuck and broken bolts in this manner:

I use a clay like substance called here in the USA Duct Seal.

I build up a small dam around the offending bolts and fill the dam with PB blaster for a week. The bolts almost always are loose by that time if not I continue the process eventually they come out.

It is also important to try to turn the bolt in both directions to spread the PB blaster.

When I re install them I use a paste called never seize high temperature. It is especially good on the outhaul shaft.

Works like a charm.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Monday, October 17, 2016 8:48 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Windlass bolt to deck

 

 

Mike,

Danny's thru-bolt solution sounds good and the drilling, as he points out, will be the key to success. With the good amount of bolt you've got left above deck you may want to try removing it before you go to drilling it out, even though it may shear off. After a good soaking with penetrants (use some acid too, to attack the salts) you may be able to lock two nuts on top to screw it out. If or when that fails you could weld a short bolt of the same diameter to the broken end and use the new bolts hex head to turn. The welding heat may also help break the threads free. If still no joy,you're likely into drilling it out,. Here's a great link to using tread inserts after drilling out the bolt. https://racemagazine.com.au/cars/thread-repair-how-to-fix-broken-bolts-and-stripped-threads

Good luck with it,

Craig Briggs, SN68 Sangaris. 



---In amelyachtowners@..., <simms@...> wrote :

Hi mike. I drilled mine out and put a bolt through. I now have a nut top and bottom
I  lost a lot of sweat and blunted several drills in the process. If you can get a cobalt drill they cut stainless much better than the standard. I didn't have one, as always I was fixing a boat in an exotic location.
Cheers
Danny
SM 299 ocean pearl
Sent from my Vodafone Smart

On Oct 17, 2016 4:33 AM, "'Mike Ondra' mdondra@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

[Attachment(s) from Mike Ondra included below]

As others may have experienced with removing the windlass from the deck, 3 of the 4 bolts were easily removed. The aft starboard bolt is threaded into the deck (no visible nut and probably into a glassed in steel plate). In fact in the bow locker there is rust stain coming through the fiberglass deck and also all along the hawse pipe.

 

In attempting removal the bolt head sheared off leaving a stud about 1” above the deck as pictured above (assuming picture goes with email. I am afraid that continuing to attempt to remove the remaining bole will simply result in shearing off at the deck line. My question is what have others done in this situation?

 

I can envision finding a coupling that could be used but would require an enlargement of the bolt hole in the windlass base thereby weakening it. The stud could be cut off and the windlass moved slightly with new holes for all bolts.

 

Thoughts?

 

Mike Ondra

Aletes SM#240

Rock Hall, MD

 

Alexandre Uster von Baar
 

I like the idea!
Adding duck seal on my list of things to find!
Alexandre



--------------------------------------------

On Mon, 10/17/16, 'sailormon' kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Windlass bolt to deck
To: amelyachtowners@...
Date: Monday, October 17, 2016, 9:26 PM


 









I have had great
success over the years removing stuck and broken bolts in
this manner:I use a clay like
substance called here in the USA Duct Seal.I build up a small dam
around the offending bolts and fill the dam with PB blaster
for a week. The bolts almost always are loose by that time
if not I continue the process eventually they come
out.It is also important to
try to turn the bolt in both directions to spread the PB
blaster.When I re install them
I use a paste called never seize high temperature. It is
especially good on the outhaul shaft.Works like a
charm.Fair
WindsEricKimberlite Amel Super
Maramu #376    From: amelyachtowners@...
[mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Monday, October 17, 2016 8:48
AM
To:
amelyachtowners@...
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners]
Windlass bolt to deck    Mike,Danny's thru-bolt
solution sounds good and the drilling, as he points out,
will be the key to success. With the good amount of bolt
you've got left above deck you may want to try removing
it before you go to drilling it out, even though it may
shear off. After a good soaking with penetrants (use some
acid too, to attack the salts) you may be able to lock two
nuts on top to screw it out. If or when that fails you could
weld a short bolt of the same diameter to the broken end and
use the new bolts hex head to turn. The welding heat may
also help break the threads free. If still no joy,you're
likely into drilling it out,. Here's a great link to
using tread inserts after drilling out the bolt. https://racemagazine.com.au/cars/thread-repair-how-to-fix-broken-bolts-and-stripped-threadsGood luck with
it,Craig
Briggs, SN68 Sangaris. 

---In amelyachtowners@...,
<simms@...> wrote
:Hi mike.
I drilled mine out and put a bolt through. I now have a nut
top and bottom
I  lost a lot of sweat and
blunted several drills in the process. If you can get a
cobalt drill they cut stainless much better than the
standard. I didn't have one, as always I was fixing a
boat in an exotic location.
Cheers
Danny
SM 299 ocean pearl
Sent from my Vodafone SmartOn Oct 17, 2016 4:33 AM,
"'Mike Ondra' mdondra@...
[amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...>
wrote: [Attachment(s) from
Mike Ondra included below]As others may have experienced
with removing the windlass from the deck, 3 of the 4 bolts
were easily removed. The aft starboard bolt is threaded into
the deck (no visible nut and probably into a glassed in
steel plate). In fact in the bow locker there is rust stain
coming through the fiberglass deck and also all along the
hawse pipe. In attempting removal the bolt
head sheared off leaving a stud about 1” above the deck as
pictured above (assuming picture goes with email. I am
afraid that continuing to attempt to remove the remaining
bole will simply result in shearing off at the deck line. My
question is what have others done in this situation? I can envision finding a coupling
that could be used but would require an enlargement of the
bolt hole in the windlass base thereby weakening it. The
stud could be cut off and the windlass moved slightly with
new holes for all bolts. Thoughts? Mike OndraAletes SM#240Rock Hall,
MD 










#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137 --
#yiv0053232137ygrp-mkp {
border:1px solid #d8d8d8;font-family:Arial;margin:10px
0;padding:0 10px;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-mkp hr {
border:1px solid #d8d8d8;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-mkp #yiv0053232137hd {
color:#628c2a;font-size:85%;font-weight:700;line-height:122%;margin:10px
0;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-mkp #yiv0053232137ads {
margin-bottom:10px;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-mkp .yiv0053232137ad {
padding:0 0;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-mkp .yiv0053232137ad p {
margin:0;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-mkp .yiv0053232137ad a {
color:#0000ff;text-decoration:none;}
#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-sponsor
#yiv0053232137ygrp-lc {
font-family:Arial;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-sponsor
#yiv0053232137ygrp-lc #yiv0053232137hd {
margin:10px
0px;font-weight:700;font-size:78%;line-height:122%;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-sponsor
#yiv0053232137ygrp-lc .yiv0053232137ad {
margin-bottom:10px;padding:0 0;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137actions {
font-family:Verdana;font-size:11px;padding:10px 0;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137activity {
background-color:#e0ecee;float:left;font-family:Verdana;font-size:10px;padding:10px;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137activity span {
font-weight:700;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137activity span:first-child {
text-transform:uppercase;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137activity span a {
color:#5085b6;text-decoration:none;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137activity span span {
color:#ff7900;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137activity span
.yiv0053232137underline {
text-decoration:underline;}

#yiv0053232137 .yiv0053232137attach {
clear:both;display:table;font-family:Arial;font-size:12px;padding:10px
0;width:400px;}

#yiv0053232137 .yiv0053232137attach div a {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv0053232137 .yiv0053232137attach img {
border:none;padding-right:5px;}

#yiv0053232137 .yiv0053232137attach label {
display:block;margin-bottom:5px;}

#yiv0053232137 .yiv0053232137attach label a {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv0053232137 blockquote {
margin:0 0 0 4px;}

#yiv0053232137 .yiv0053232137bold {
font-family:Arial;font-size:13px;font-weight:700;}

#yiv0053232137 .yiv0053232137bold a {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv0053232137 dd.yiv0053232137last p a {
font-family:Verdana;font-weight:700;}

#yiv0053232137 dd.yiv0053232137last p span {
margin-right:10px;font-family:Verdana;font-weight:700;}

#yiv0053232137 dd.yiv0053232137last p
span.yiv0053232137yshortcuts {
margin-right:0;}

#yiv0053232137 div.yiv0053232137attach-table div div a {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv0053232137 div.yiv0053232137attach-table {
width:400px;}

#yiv0053232137 div.yiv0053232137file-title a, #yiv0053232137
div.yiv0053232137file-title a:active, #yiv0053232137
div.yiv0053232137file-title a:hover, #yiv0053232137
div.yiv0053232137file-title a:visited {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv0053232137 div.yiv0053232137photo-title a,
#yiv0053232137 div.yiv0053232137photo-title a:active,
#yiv0053232137 div.yiv0053232137photo-title a:hover,
#yiv0053232137 div.yiv0053232137photo-title a:visited {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv0053232137 div#yiv0053232137ygrp-mlmsg
#yiv0053232137ygrp-msg p a span.yiv0053232137yshortcuts {
font-family:Verdana;font-size:10px;font-weight:normal;}

#yiv0053232137 .yiv0053232137green {
color:#628c2a;}

#yiv0053232137 .yiv0053232137MsoNormal {
margin:0 0 0 0;}

#yiv0053232137 o {
font-size:0;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137photos div {
float:left;width:72px;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137photos div div {
border:1px solid
#666666;height:62px;overflow:hidden;width:62px;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137photos div label {
color:#666666;font-size:10px;overflow:hidden;text-align:center;white-space:nowrap;width:64px;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137reco-category {
font-size:77%;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137reco-desc {
font-size:77%;}

#yiv0053232137 .yiv0053232137replbq {
margin:4px;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-actbar div a:first-child {
margin-right:2px;padding-right:5px;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-mlmsg {
font-size:13px;font-family:Arial, helvetica, clean,
sans-serif;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-mlmsg table {
font-size:inherit;font:100%;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-mlmsg select,
#yiv0053232137 input, #yiv0053232137 textarea {
font:99% Arial, Helvetica, clean, sans-serif;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-mlmsg pre, #yiv0053232137
code {
font:115% monospace;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-mlmsg * {
line-height:1.22em;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-mlmsg #yiv0053232137logo {
padding-bottom:10px;}


#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-msg p a {
font-family:Verdana;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-msg
p#yiv0053232137attach-count span {
color:#1E66AE;font-weight:700;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-reco
#yiv0053232137reco-head {
color:#ff7900;font-weight:700;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-reco {
margin-bottom:20px;padding:0px;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-sponsor #yiv0053232137ov
li a {
font-size:130%;text-decoration:none;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-sponsor #yiv0053232137ov
li {
font-size:77%;list-style-type:square;padding:6px 0;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-sponsor #yiv0053232137ov
ul {
margin:0;padding:0 0 0 8px;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-text {
font-family:Georgia;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-text p {
margin:0 0 1em 0;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-text tt {
font-size:120%;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-vital ul li:last-child {
border-right:none !important;
}
#yiv0053232137

INUS - BUSCH
 

Concerning removing studs
I just read an instructive article in the latest PBO November 2016 pages 84-85.
If someone is interested and not having access pls send me an email inusbusch (at) yahoo (dot) de, I will try to send pictures.

Dieter 
Sharki #235

Von meinem iPhone gesendet

Am 18.10.2016 um 12:42 schrieb Alexandre Uster von Baar uster@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>:

 

I like the idea!
Adding duck seal on my list of things to find!
Alexandre

--------------------------------------------
On Mon, 10/17/16, 'sailormon' kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Windlass bolt to deck
To: amelyachtowners@...
Date: Monday, October 17, 2016, 9:26 PM


 









I have had great
success over the years removing stuck and broken bolts in
this manner:I use a clay like
substance called here in the USA Duct Seal.I build up a small dam
around the offending bolts and fill the dam with PB blaster
for a week. The bolts almost always are loose by that time
if not I continue the process eventually they come
out.It is also important to
try to turn the bolt in both directions to spread the PB
blaster.When I re install them
I use a paste called never seize high temperature. It is
especially good on the outhaul shaft.Works like a
charm.Fair
WindsEricKimberlite Amel Super
Maramu #376    From: amelyachtowners@...
[mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Monday, October 17, 2016 8:48
AM
To:
amelyachtowners@...
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners]
Windlass bolt to deck    Mike,Danny's thru-bolt
solution sounds good and the drilling, as he points out,
will be the key to success. With the good amount of bolt
you've got left above deck you may want to try removing
it before you go to drilling it out, even though it may
shear off. After a good soaking with penetrants (use some
acid too, to attack the salts) you may be able to lock two
nuts on top to screw it out. If or when that fails you could
weld a short bolt of the same diameter to the broken end and
use the new bolts hex head to turn. The welding heat may
also help break the threads free. If still no joy,you're
likely into drilling it out,. Here's a great link to
using tread inserts after drilling out the bolt. https://racemagazine.com.au/cars/thread-repair-how-to-fix-broken-bolts-and-stripped-threadsGood luck with
it,Craig
Briggs, SN68 Sangaris. 

---In amelyachtowners@...,
<simms@...> wrote
:Hi mike.
I drilled mine out and put a bolt through. I now have a nut
top and bottom
I  lost a lot of sweat and
blunted several drills in the process. If you can get a
cobalt drill they cut stainless much better than the
standard. I didn't have one, as always I was fixing a
boat in an exotic location.
Cheers
Danny
SM 299 ocean pearl
Sent from my Vodafone SmartOn Oct 17, 2016 4:33 AM,
"'Mike Ondra' mdondra@...
[amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...>
wrote: [Attachment(s) from
Mike Ondra included below]As others may have experienced
with removing the windlass from the deck, 3 of the 4 bolts
were easily removed. The aft starboard bolt is threaded into
the deck (no visible nut and probably into a glassed in
steel plate). In fact in the bow locker there is rust stain
coming through the fiberglass deck and also all along the
hawse pipe. In attempting removal the bolt
head sheared off leaving a stud about 1” above the deck as
pictured above (assuming picture goes with email. I am
afraid that continuing to attempt to remove the remaining
bole will simply result in shearing off at the deck line. My
question is what have others done in this situation? I can envision finding a coupling
that could be used but would require an enlargement of the
bolt hole in the windlass base thereby weakening it. The
stud could be cut off and the windlass moved slightly with
new holes for all bolts. Thoughts? Mike OndraAletes SM#240Rock Hall,
MD 










#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137 --
#yiv0053232137ygrp-mkp {
border:1px solid #d8d8d8;font-family:Arial;margin:10px
0;padding:0 10px;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-mkp hr {
border:1px solid #d8d8d8;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-mkp #yiv0053232137hd {
color:#628c2a;font-size:85%;font-weight:700;line-height:122%;margin:10px
0;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-mkp #yiv0053232137ads {
margin-bottom:10px;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-mkp .yiv0053232137ad {
padding:0 0;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-mkp .yiv0053232137ad p {
margin:0;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-mkp .yiv0053232137ad a {
color:#0000ff;text-decoration:none;}
#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-sponsor
#yiv0053232137ygrp-lc {
font-family:Arial;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-sponsor
#yiv0053232137ygrp-lc #yiv0053232137hd {
margin:10px
0px;font-weight:700;font-size:78%;line-height:122%;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-sponsor
#yiv0053232137ygrp-lc .yiv0053232137ad {
margin-bottom:10px;padding:0 0;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137actions {
font-family:Verdana;font-size:11px;padding:10px 0;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137activity {
background-color:#e0ecee;float:left;font-family:Verdana;font-size:10px;padding:10px;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137activity span {
font-weight:700;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137activity span:first-child {
text-transform:uppercase;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137activity span a {
color:#5085b6;text-decoration:none;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137activity span span {
color:#ff7900;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137activity span
.yiv0053232137underline {
text-decoration:underline;}

#yiv0053232137 .yiv0053232137attach {
clear:both;display:table;font-family:Arial;font-size:12px;padding:10px
0;width:400px;}

#yiv0053232137 .yiv0053232137attach div a {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv0053232137 .yiv0053232137attach img {
border:none;padding-right:5px;}

#yiv0053232137 .yiv0053232137attach label {
display:block;margin-bottom:5px;}

#yiv0053232137 .yiv0053232137attach label a {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv0053232137 blockquote {
margin:0 0 0 4px;}

#yiv0053232137 .yiv0053232137bold {
font-family:Arial;font-size:13px;font-weight:700;}

#yiv0053232137 .yiv0053232137bold a {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv0053232137 dd.yiv0053232137last p a {
font-family:Verdana;font-weight:700;}

#yiv0053232137 dd.yiv0053232137last p span {
margin-right:10px;font-family:Verdana;font-weight:700;}

#yiv0053232137 dd.yiv0053232137last p
span.yiv0053232137yshortcuts {
margin-right:0;}

#yiv0053232137 div.yiv0053232137attach-table div div a {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv0053232137 div.yiv0053232137attach-table {
width:400px;}

#yiv0053232137 div.yiv0053232137file-title a, #yiv0053232137
div.yiv0053232137file-title a:active, #yiv0053232137
div.yiv0053232137file-title a:hover, #yiv0053232137
div.yiv0053232137file-title a:visited {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv0053232137 div.yiv0053232137photo-title a,
#yiv0053232137 div.yiv0053232137photo-title a:active,
#yiv0053232137 div.yiv0053232137photo-title a:hover,
#yiv0053232137 div.yiv0053232137photo-title a:visited {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv0053232137 div#yiv0053232137ygrp-mlmsg
#yiv0053232137ygrp-msg p a span.yiv0053232137yshortcuts {
font-family:Verdana;font-size:10px;font-weight:normal;}

#yiv0053232137 .yiv0053232137green {
color:#628c2a;}

#yiv0053232137 .yiv0053232137MsoNormal {
margin:0 0 0 0;}

#yiv0053232137 o {
font-size:0;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137photos div {
float:left;width:72px;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137photos div div {
border:1px solid
#666666;height:62px;overflow:hidden;width:62px;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137photos div label {
color:#666666;font-size:10px;overflow:hidden;text-align:center;white-space:nowrap;width:64px;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137reco-category {
font-size:77%;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137reco-desc {
font-size:77%;}

#yiv0053232137 .yiv0053232137replbq {
margin:4px;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-actbar div a:first-child {
margin-right:2px;padding-right:5px;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-mlmsg {
font-size:13px;font-family:Arial, helvetica, clean,
sans-serif;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-mlmsg table {
font-size:inherit;font:100%;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-mlmsg select,
#yiv0053232137 input, #yiv0053232137 textarea {
font:99% Arial, Helvetica, clean, sans-serif;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-mlmsg pre, #yiv0053232137
code {
font:115% monospace;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-mlmsg * {
line-height:1.22em;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-mlmsg #yiv0053232137logo {
padding-bottom:10px;}


#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-msg p a {
font-family:Verdana;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-msg
p#yiv0053232137attach-count span {
color:#1E66AE;font-weight:700;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-reco
#yiv0053232137reco-head {
color:#ff7900;font-weight:700;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-reco {
margin-bottom:20px;padding:0px;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-sponsor #yiv0053232137ov
li a {
font-size:130%;text-decoration:none;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-sponsor #yiv0053232137ov
li {
font-size:77%;list-style-type:square;padding:6px 0;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-sponsor #yiv0053232137ov
ul {
margin:0;padding:0 0 0 8px;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-text {
font-family:Georgia;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-text p {
margin:0 0 1em 0;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-text tt {
font-size:120%;}

#yiv0053232137 #yiv0053232137ygrp-vital ul li:last-child {
border-right:none !important;
}
#yiv0053232137

Bill Kinney <greatketch@...>
 

Eric,

Another success for your dam technique!  Thanks for the suggestion.

I had a 5mm machine screw that I had almost given up on getting out in one piece. Not only was it a stainless screw corroded into aluminum, but it had also been sheared, and was bent, jamming the threads for that extra measure of difficulty. And it’s not big enough to really lean on without breaking.  Oil, heat, pressure, over and over, and not so much as a wiggle.

I didn’t have any “duct seal” so I improvised by making a stiff dough of flour and water for the dam. It wasn’t perfect, but it worked. After twenty-four hours of soaking in a puddle of PB Blaster, the screw backed out easily.  I can see using this often in my future.

Bill Kinney
SM #160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD
“Ships and men rot in port."





On Oct 17, 2016, at 22:26, 'sailormon' kimberlite@... melyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


I have had great success over the years removing stuck and broken bolts in this manner:

I use a clay like substance called here in the USA Duct Seal.

I build up a small dam around the offending bolts and fill the dam with PB blaster for a week. The bolts almost always are loose by that time if not I continue the process eventually they come out.

It is also important to try to turn the bolt in both directions to spread the PB blaster.

When I re install them I use a paste called never seize high temperature. It is especially good on the outhaul shaft.

Works like a charm.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...] 
Sent: Monday, October 17, 2016 8:48 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Windlass bolt to deck

 

  

Mike,

Danny's thru-bolt solution sounds good and the drilling, as he points out, will be the key to success. With the good amount of bolt you've got left above deck you may want to try removing it before you go to drilling it out, even though it may shear off. After a good soaking with penetrants (use some acid too, to attack the salts) you may be able to lock two nuts on top to screw it out. If or when that fails you could weld a short bolt of the same diameter to the broken end and use the new bolts hex head to turn. The welding heat may also help break the threads free. If still no joy,you're likely into drilling it out,. Here's a great link to using tread inserts after drilling out the bolt. https://racemagazine.com.au/cars/thread-repair-how-to-fix-broken-bolts-and-stripped-threads

Good luck with it,

Craig Briggs, SN68 Sangaris. 



---In amelyachtowners@..., <simms@...> wrote :

Hi mike. I drilled mine out and put a bolt through. I now have a nut top and bottom
I  lost a lot of sweat and blunted several drills in the process. If you can get a cobalt drill they cut stainless much better than the standard. I didn't have one, as always I was fixing a boat in an exotic location.
Cheers
Danny
SM 299 ocean pearl
Sent from my Vodafone Smart

On Oct 17, 2016 4:33 AM, "'Mike Ondra' mdondra@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

[Attachment(s) from Mike Ondra included below]

As others may have experienced with removing the windlass from the deck, 3 of the 4 bolts were easily removed. The aft starboard bolt is threaded into the deck (no visible nut and probably into a glassed in steel plate). In fact in the bow locker there is rust stain coming through the fiberglass deck and also all along the hawse pipe.

 

In attempting removal the bolt head sheared off leaving a stud about 1” above the deck as pictured above (assuming picture goes with email. I am afraid that continuing to attempt to remove the remaining bole will simply result in shearing off at the deck line. My question is what have others done in this situation?

 

I can envision finding a coupling that could be used but would require an enlargement of the bolt hole in the windlass base thereby weakening it. The stud could be cut off and the windlass moved slightly with new holes for all bolts.

 

Thoughts?

 

Mike Ondra

Aletes SM#240

Rock Hall, MD

 



eric freedman
 

Bill,

Glad it worked,

You might also invest in the purple cobalt drills from McMaster Carr they are made especially for drilling stainless. They are not inexpensive but I keep them on board when all else fails. I also use the dam technique when drilling stainless and fill it with drilling oil for stainless also from McMaster.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, October 19, 2016 3:51 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Windlass bolt to deck

 

 

Eric,

 

Another success for your dam technique!  Thanks for the suggestion.

 

I had a 5mm machine screw that I had almost given up on getting out in one piece. Not only was it a stainless screw corroded into aluminum, but it had also been sheared, and was bent, jamming the threads for that extra measure of difficulty. And it’s not big enough to really lean on without breaking.  Oil, heat, pressure, over and over, and not so much as a wiggle.

 

I didn’t have any “duct seal” so I improvised by making a stiff dough of flour and water for the dam. It wasn’t perfect, but it worked. After twenty-four hours of soaking in a puddle of PB Blaster, the screw backed out easily.  I can see using this often in my future.

 

Bill Kinney

SM #160, Harmonie

Annapolis, MD

“Ships and men rot in port."

 

 

 

 

On Oct 17, 2016, at 22:26, 'sailormon' kimberlite@... melyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

 

I have had great success over the years removing stuck and broken bolts in this manner:

I use a clay like substance called here in the USA Duct Seal.

I build up a small dam around the offending bolts and fill the dam with PB blaster for a week. The bolts almost always are loose by that time if not I continue the process eventually they come out.

It is also important to try to turn the bolt in both directions to spread the PB blaster.

When I re install them I use a paste called never seize high temperature. It is especially good on the outhaul shaft.

Works like a charm.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...] 
Sent: Monday, October 17, 2016 8:48 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Windlass bolt to deck

 

  

Mike,

Danny's thru-bolt solution sounds good and the drilling, as he points out, will be the key to success. With the good amount of bolt you've got left above deck you may want to try removing it before you go to drilling it out, even though it may shear off. After a good soaking with penetrants (use some acid too, to attack the salts) you may be able to lock two nuts on top to screw it out. If or when that fails you could weld a short bolt of the same diameter to the broken end and use the new bolts hex head to turn. The welding heat may also help break the threads free. If still no joy,you're likely into drilling it out,. Here's a great link to using tread inserts after drilling out the bolt. https://racemagazine.com.au/cars/thread-repair-how-to-fix-broken-bolts-and-stripped-threads

Good luck with it,

Craig Briggs, SN68 Sangaris. 



---In amelyachtowners@..., <simms@...> wrote :

Hi mike. I drilled mine out and put a bolt through. I now have a nut top and bottom
I  lost a lot of sweat and blunted several drills in the process. If you can get a cobalt drill they cut stainless much better than the standard. I didn't have one, as always I was fixing a boat in an exotic location.
Cheers
Danny
SM 299 ocean pearl
Sent from my Vodafone Smart

On Oct 17, 2016 4:33 AM, "'Mike Ondra' mdondra@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

[Attachment(s) from Mike Ondra included below]

As others may have experienced with removing the windlass from the deck, 3 of the 4 bolts were easily removed. The aft starboard bolt is threaded into the deck (no visible nut and probably into a glassed in steel plate). In fact in the bow locker there is rust stain coming through the fiberglass deck and also all along the hawse pipe.

 

In attempting removal the bolt head sheared off leaving a stud about 1” above the deck as pictured above (assuming picture goes with email. I am afraid that continuing to attempt to remove the remaining bole will simply result in shearing off at the deck line. My question is what have others done in this situation?

 

I can envision finding a coupling that could be used but would require an enlargement of the bolt hole in the windlass base thereby weakening it. The stud could be cut off and the windlass moved slightly with new holes for all bolts.

 

Thoughts?

 

Mike Ondra

Aletes SM#240

Rock Hall, MD

 

 

 

Mike Ondra
 

Just about complete with the reinstallation of the windlass. Question on the last bolt that finishes into the glassed in plate at the hawse pipe. To avoid future difficulty extracting and to be assured that the bolt is well secured, I would like to drill through the bottom of the bolt hole and through-bolt with washer and nut exposed below in the bow locker like the other 3 bolts. Does anyone have ideas about why Amel did not through-bolt this last bolt in the first place? Anyone see a downside for this solution? We are always nervous about varying from what the Captain designed.

Mike Ondra

Aletes SM#240

Rock Hall, MD

greatketch@...
 

Mike,

If you think think you have enough threads left in the metal plate, the best thing to do is to use it, and the best way to avoid future problems is to make sure the windlass is well bedded down so it doesn't leak, and use a good thread lubricant on the bolt.  Tef-gel, Lanacote, or something similar.  

The reason Amel put a plate in the deck only for that bolt, is that for the other three bolts there was plenty of room to add proper backing plates under the deck.  With the chainpipe right there, there was no room for a backing plate. A bolt and washer is not sufficient to distribute the load from a windlass to an unreinforced deck.  Now, since the plate will still be there to help distribute the load, even if you do switch to a thru-bolt, it's not that big a change.

Oh, yes and then follow Lofrans recommendations for rebedding the windlass on a regular basis.

By the way, I have seen people refer to the plate as "steel", but there is nothing magnetic in my deck there, so I am guessing it is stainless.

Bill Kinney
SM #160 Harmonie
Annapolis, MD

 

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Mike,
having been through the same experience I did through bolt. It cant make any difference to the strength. As I said in an earlier post this bolt carries more load than the others being anchored to the hawse pipe. I used the anchor a couple of times before I got it replaced and there was deck flex. If you don't through bolt it I suggest you use a stud (a bolt threaded both ends) and have a nut on top. Why risk the same thing happening again.
Danny
SM 299 Ocean Pearl
 


From: "mdondra@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...>
To: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Sunday, 23 October 2016 2:03 AM
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Windlass bolt to deck

 
Just about complete with the reinstallation of the windlass. Question on the last bolt that finishes into the glassed in plate at the hawse pipe. To avoid future difficulty extracting and to be assured that the bolt is well secured, I would like to drill through the bottom of the bolt hole and through-bolt with washer and nut exposed below in the bow locker like the other 3 bolts. Does anyone have ideas about why Amel did not through-bolt this last bolt in the first place? Anyone see a downside for this solution? We are always nervous about varying from what the Captain designed.
Mike Ondra
Aletes SM#240
Rock Hall, MD


Alexandre Uster von Baar
 

Hello Mike,
Personally I would keep it as it is, just add grease, never seen or your favorite lubricant.
I believe that if you do that maintenance on a regular basis, like Kent, you won't have problem removing that bolt.

Sincerely, Alexandre
SM2K #289 NIKIMAT
Club Nautico de San Juan, Puerto Rico



--------------------------------------------

On Sat, 10/22/16, mdondra@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Windlass bolt to deck
To: amelyachtowners@...
Date: Saturday, October 22, 2016, 8:03 AM


 









Just about complete with the reinstallation
of the windlass. Question on the last bolt that finishes
into the glassed in plate at the hawse pipe. To avoid future
difficulty extracting and to be assured that the bolt is
well secured, I would like to drill through the bottom of
the bolt hole and through-bolt with washer and nut exposed
below in the bow locker like the other 3 bolts. Does anyone
have ideas about why Amel did not through-bolt this last
bolt in the first place? Anyone see a downside for this
solution? We are always nervous about varying from what the
Captain designed.Mike OndraAletes
SM#240Rock Hall, MD










#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615 --
#yiv2203526615ygrp-mkp {
border:1px solid #d8d8d8;font-family:Arial;margin:10px
0;padding:0 10px;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-mkp hr {
border:1px solid #d8d8d8;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-mkp #yiv2203526615hd {
color:#628c2a;font-size:85%;font-weight:700;line-height:122%;margin:10px
0;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-mkp #yiv2203526615ads {
margin-bottom:10px;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-mkp .yiv2203526615ad {
padding:0 0;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-mkp .yiv2203526615ad p {
margin:0;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-mkp .yiv2203526615ad a {
color:#0000ff;text-decoration:none;}
#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-sponsor
#yiv2203526615ygrp-lc {
font-family:Arial;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-sponsor
#yiv2203526615ygrp-lc #yiv2203526615hd {
margin:10px
0px;font-weight:700;font-size:78%;line-height:122%;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-sponsor
#yiv2203526615ygrp-lc .yiv2203526615ad {
margin-bottom:10px;padding:0 0;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615actions {
font-family:Verdana;font-size:11px;padding:10px 0;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615activity {
background-color:#e0ecee;float:left;font-family:Verdana;font-size:10px;padding:10px;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615activity span {
font-weight:700;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615activity span:first-child {
text-transform:uppercase;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615activity span a {
color:#5085b6;text-decoration:none;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615activity span span {
color:#ff7900;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615activity span
.yiv2203526615underline {
text-decoration:underline;}

#yiv2203526615 .yiv2203526615attach {
clear:both;display:table;font-family:Arial;font-size:12px;padding:10px
0;width:400px;}

#yiv2203526615 .yiv2203526615attach div a {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv2203526615 .yiv2203526615attach img {
border:none;padding-right:5px;}

#yiv2203526615 .yiv2203526615attach label {
display:block;margin-bottom:5px;}

#yiv2203526615 .yiv2203526615attach label a {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv2203526615 blockquote {
margin:0 0 0 4px;}

#yiv2203526615 .yiv2203526615bold {
font-family:Arial;font-size:13px;font-weight:700;}

#yiv2203526615 .yiv2203526615bold a {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv2203526615 dd.yiv2203526615last p a {
font-family:Verdana;font-weight:700;}

#yiv2203526615 dd.yiv2203526615last p span {
margin-right:10px;font-family:Verdana;font-weight:700;}

#yiv2203526615 dd.yiv2203526615last p
span.yiv2203526615yshortcuts {
margin-right:0;}

#yiv2203526615 div.yiv2203526615attach-table div div a {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv2203526615 div.yiv2203526615attach-table {
width:400px;}

#yiv2203526615 div.yiv2203526615file-title a, #yiv2203526615
div.yiv2203526615file-title a:active, #yiv2203526615
div.yiv2203526615file-title a:hover, #yiv2203526615
div.yiv2203526615file-title a:visited {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv2203526615 div.yiv2203526615photo-title a,
#yiv2203526615 div.yiv2203526615photo-title a:active,
#yiv2203526615 div.yiv2203526615photo-title a:hover,
#yiv2203526615 div.yiv2203526615photo-title a:visited {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv2203526615 div#yiv2203526615ygrp-mlmsg
#yiv2203526615ygrp-msg p a span.yiv2203526615yshortcuts {
font-family:Verdana;font-size:10px;font-weight:normal;}

#yiv2203526615 .yiv2203526615green {
color:#628c2a;}

#yiv2203526615 .yiv2203526615MsoNormal {
margin:0 0 0 0;}

#yiv2203526615 o {
font-size:0;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615photos div {
float:left;width:72px;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615photos div div {
border:1px solid
#666666;height:62px;overflow:hidden;width:62px;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615photos div label {
color:#666666;font-size:10px;overflow:hidden;text-align:center;white-space:nowrap;width:64px;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615reco-category {
font-size:77%;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615reco-desc {
font-size:77%;}

#yiv2203526615 .yiv2203526615replbq {
margin:4px;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-actbar div a:first-child {
margin-right:2px;padding-right:5px;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-mlmsg {
font-size:13px;font-family:Arial, helvetica, clean,
sans-serif;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-mlmsg table {
font-size:inherit;font:100%;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-mlmsg select,
#yiv2203526615 input, #yiv2203526615 textarea {
font:99% Arial, Helvetica, clean, sans-serif;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-mlmsg pre, #yiv2203526615
code {
font:115% monospace;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-mlmsg * {
line-height:1.22em;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-mlmsg #yiv2203526615logo {
padding-bottom:10px;}


#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-msg p a {
font-family:Verdana;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-msg
p#yiv2203526615attach-count span {
color:#1E66AE;font-weight:700;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-reco
#yiv2203526615reco-head {
color:#ff7900;font-weight:700;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-reco {
margin-bottom:20px;padding:0px;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-sponsor #yiv2203526615ov
li a {
font-size:130%;text-decoration:none;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-sponsor #yiv2203526615ov
li {
font-size:77%;list-style-type:square;padding:6px 0;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-sponsor #yiv2203526615ov
ul {
margin:0;padding:0 0 0 8px;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-text {
font-family:Georgia;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-text p {
margin:0 0 1em 0;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-text tt {
font-size:120%;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-vital ul li:last-child {
border-right:none !important;
}
#yiv2203526615

Mike Ondra
 

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Saturday, October 22, 2016 8:13 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Windlass bolt to deck

 

 

Hello Mike,
Personally I would keep it as it is, just add grease, never seen or your favorite lubricant.
I believe that if you do that maintenance on a regular basis, like Kent, you won't have problem removing that bolt.

Sincerely, Alexandre
SM2K #289 NIKIMAT
Club Nautico de San Juan, Puerto Rico

--------------------------------------------
On Sat, 10/22/16, mdondra@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Windlass bolt to deck
To: amelyachtowners@...
Date: Saturday, October 22, 2016, 8:03 AM


 









Just about complete with the reinstallation
of the windlass. Question on the last bolt that finishes
into the glassed in plate at the hawse pipe. To avoid future
difficulty extracting and to be assured that the bolt is
well secured, I would like to drill through the bottom of
the bolt hole and through-bolt with washer and nut exposed
below in the bow locker like the other 3 bolts. Does anyone
have ideas about why Amel did not through-bolt this last
bolt in the first place? Anyone see a downside for this
solution? We are always nervous about varying from what the
Captain designed.Mike OndraAletes
SM#240Rock Hall, MD










#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615 --
#yiv2203526615ygrp-mkp {
border:1px solid #d8d8d8;font-family:Arial;margin:10px
0;padding:0 10px;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-mkp hr {
border:1px solid #d8d8d8;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-mkp #yiv2203526615hd {
color:#628c2a;font-size:85%;font-weight:700;line-height:122%;margin:10px
0;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-mkp #yiv2203526615ads {
margin-bottom:10px;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-mkp .yiv2203526615ad {
padding:0 0;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-mkp .yiv2203526615ad p {
margin:0;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-mkp .yiv2203526615ad a {
color:#0000ff;text-decoration:none;}
#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-sponsor
#yiv2203526615ygrp-lc {
font-family:Arial;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-sponsor
#yiv2203526615ygrp-lc #yiv2203526615hd {
margin:10px
0px;font-weight:700;font-size:78%;line-height:122%;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-sponsor
#yiv2203526615ygrp-lc .yiv2203526615ad {
margin-bottom:10px;padding:0 0;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615actions {
font-family:Verdana;font-size:11px;padding:10px 0;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615activity {
background-color:#e0ecee;float:left;font-family:Verdana;font-size:10px;padding:10px;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615activity span {
font-weight:700;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615activity span:first-child {
text-transform:uppercase;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615activity span a {
color:#5085b6;text-decoration:none;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615activity span span {
color:#ff7900;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615activity span
.yiv2203526615underline {
text-decoration:underline;}

#yiv2203526615 .yiv2203526615attach {
clear:both;display:table;font-family:Arial;font-size:12px;padding:10px
0;width:400px;}

#yiv2203526615 .yiv2203526615attach div a {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv2203526615 .yiv2203526615attach img {
border:none;padding-right:5px;}

#yiv2203526615 .yiv2203526615attach label {
display:block;margin-bottom:5px;}

#yiv2203526615 .yiv2203526615attach label a {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv2203526615 blockquote {
margin:0 0 0 4px;}

#yiv2203526615 .yiv2203526615bold {
font-family:Arial;font-size:13px;font-weight:700;}

#yiv2203526615 .yiv2203526615bold a {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv2203526615 dd.yiv2203526615last p a {
font-family:Verdana;font-weight:700;}

#yiv2203526615 dd.yiv2203526615last p span {
margin-right:10px;font-family:Verdana;font-weight:700;}

#yiv2203526615 dd.yiv2203526615last p
span.yiv2203526615yshortcuts {
margin-right:0;}

#yiv2203526615 div.yiv2203526615attach-table div div a {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv2203526615 div.yiv2203526615attach-table {
width:400px;}

#yiv2203526615 div.yiv2203526615file-title a, #yiv2203526615
div.yiv2203526615file-title a:active, #yiv2203526615
div.yiv2203526615file-title a:hover, #yiv2203526615
div.yiv2203526615file-title a:visited {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv2203526615 div.yiv2203526615photo-title a,
#yiv2203526615 div.yiv2203526615photo-title a:active,
#yiv2203526615 div.yiv2203526615photo-title a:hover,
#yiv2203526615 div.yiv2203526615photo-title a:visited {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv2203526615 div#yiv2203526615ygrp-mlmsg
#yiv2203526615ygrp-msg p a span.yiv2203526615yshortcuts {
font-family:Verdana;font-size:10px;font-weight:normal;}

#yiv2203526615 .yiv2203526615green {
color:#628c2a;}

#yiv2203526615 .yiv2203526615MsoNormal {
margin:0 0 0 0;}

#yiv2203526615 o {
font-size:0;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615photos div {
float:left;width:72px;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615photos div div {
border:1px solid
#666666;height:62px;overflow:hidden;width:62px;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615photos div label {
color:#666666;font-size:10px;overflow:hidden;text-align:center;white-space:nowrap;width:64px;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615reco-category {
font-size:77%;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615reco-desc {
font-size:77%;}

#yiv2203526615 .yiv2203526615replbq {
margin:4px;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-actbar div a:first-child {
margin-right:2px;padding-right:5px;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-mlmsg {
font-size:13px;font-family:Arial, helvetica, clean,
sans-serif;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-mlmsg table {
font-size:inherit;font:100%;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-mlmsg select,
#yiv2203526615 input, #yiv2203526615 textarea {
font:99% Arial, Helvetica, clean, sans-serif;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-mlmsg pre, #yiv2203526615
code {
font:115% monospace;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-mlmsg * {
line-height:1.22em;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-mlmsg #yiv2203526615logo {
padding-bottom:10px;}


#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-msg p a {
font-family:Verdana;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-msg
p#yiv2203526615attach-count span {
color:#1E66AE;font-weight:700;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-reco
#yiv2203526615reco-head {
color:#ff7900;font-weight:700;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-reco {
margin-bottom:20px;padding:0px;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-sponsor #yiv2203526615ov
li a {
font-size:130%;text-decoration:none;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-sponsor #yiv2203526615ov
li {
font-size:77%;list-style-type:square;padding:6px 0;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-sponsor #yiv2203526615ov
ul {
margin:0;padding:0 0 0 8px;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-text {
font-family:Georgia;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-text p {
margin:0 0 1em 0;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-text tt {
font-size:120%;}

#yiv2203526615 #yiv2203526615ygrp-vital ul li:last-child {
border-right:none !important;
}
#yiv2203526615

Mike Ondra
 

Thank you all for your various inputs. For the “rest of the story”. Ultimately penetrating oil, double nutting and a rather long extension on the wrench handle facilitated removal of the bolt/stud. The windlass was reinstalled with careful attention to bedding both the windlass base and all the bolts/washers. The new bolt for the embedded plate went in fine, with it’s appropriate Tef-gel coating.

Mike Ondra

Aletes SM#240

St. Augustine bound

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Saturday, October 22, 2016 1:45 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Windlass bolt to deck

 

 

Mike,

 

If you think think you have enough threads left in the metal plate, the best thing to do is to use it, and the best way to avoid future problems is to make sure the windlass is well bedded down so it doesn't leak, and use a good thread lubricant on the bolt.  Tef-gel, Lanacote, or something similar.  

 

The reason Amel put a plate in the deck only for that bolt, is that for the other three bolts there was plenty of room to add proper backing plates under the deck.  With the chainpipe right there, there was no room for a backing plate. A bolt and washer is not sufficient to distribute the load from a windlass to an unreinforced deck.  Now, since the plate will still be there to help distribute the load, even if you do switch to a thru-bolt, it's not that big a change.

 

Oh, yes and then follow Lofrans recommendations for rebedding the windlass on a regular basis.

 

By the way, I have seen people refer to the plate as "steel", but there is nothing magnetic in my deck there, so I am guessing it is stainless.

 

Bill Kinney

SM #160 Harmonie

Annapolis, MD

 

 

rossirossix4
 

Removing the stubborn windlass bolt--
Just spotted these photos of this process and I am posting this  for those who may search for solutions on windlass bolt removal in the future.  Although I spent 4 days using the dam technique-- building a small dam round the bolt and filling it with various penetrating fluids--it did not work for me.  My suspicion was that the corrosion around the bolt head and sealants at the bass of the windlass blocked the penetrating fluid.

Next I gently tapped a thin putty knife between the deck and the windlass until it was stopped by the bolt.  This cleared a channel to the bolt.  I then sprayed penetrating fluid (I used CorrosionX) and was surprised to see that it was taking fluid.  Sure enough, after a couple of hours I was able to back the bold back out.  These photos show both methods-- https://photos.app.goo.gl/C942E76KpfauET8a8 

Bob KAIMI SM429