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Anchor roller


william reynolds
 

It's time to replace my anchor roller. There have been a few inquires in the past but no suggestions.
The shaft is welded on both sides. Poor  installation.
The only  remedy I can see is to sabre saw on either side of the roller and then drill new holes for a bolt in installation..
The previous hole that was welded will be much too hard to drill out.
Anyone got any other ideas?
Bill 
CloudStreet SM2000  #331
  


Craig Briggs
 

Hi Bill, I should think that sawing will certainly work, especially since the shaft is welded so it won't spin on you. SawzAll with a metal blade may be easier than a sabre saw, but either should do. Seems, though, that you'll still have the issue of drilling out the weldment.
Also, I suspect the original installation was welded purposely so all of the frictional forces were distributed across the full width of the roller's internal bushing. Replacing with a bolt will likely allow the shaft (new bolt) to turn rather than just the roller/bushing which may cause undue wear at both ends where there's a point load against the support brackets. With some salt crud build up I could see the ends of the bolt wearing through in (relatively) short order. You may want to weld the new bolt in place (just like the Captain did! :-) .
--
Cheers, Craig - SN68 Sangaris, Tropic Isle Harbor, FL


 

It was welded for a reason.
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Sun, Oct 4, 2020 at 1:30 PM Craig Briggs via groups.io <sangaris=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Bill, I should think that sawing will certainly work, especially since the shaft is welded so it won't spin on you. SawzAll with a metal blade may be easier than a sabre saw, but either should do. Seems, though, that you'll still have the issue of drilling out the weldment.
Also, I suspect the original installation was welded purposely so all of the frictional forces were distributed across the full width of the roller's internal bushing. Replacing with a bolt will likely allow the shaft (new bolt) to turn rather than just the roller/bushing which may cause undue wear at both ends where there's a point load against the support brackets. With some salt crud build up I could see the ends of the bolt wearing through in (relatively) short order. You may want to weld the new bolt in place (just like the Captain did! :-) .
--
Cheers, Craig - SN68 Sangaris, Tropic Isle Harbor, FL


Karen Smith
 

If you need to replace the roller, it is far easier to grind off the welds on the outside of the plates.  It is welded only on the outer surface of the metal plate.  (Been there, done that!)

Then you can replace the pin with a bolt and nyloc nut of suitable size, or have a new pin welded in place if you believe that is superior.

Bill Kinney
Harmonie, SM160
Annapolis, MD


Jose Venegas
 

Bill,

I use the secondary anchor roller to pass the snubber or the mooring line. The two vertical rollers serve to reduce chafe when the line is not aligned with the boat. However, in strong wind the flat cylinder shape of the secondary anchor roller allows sliding between the snubber and the roller creating chafe and strong sounds each time the snubber slides from one side to the other.
For this reason I would like to replace the secondary anchor roller to one that includes a wedge in the center and prevents the sliding of the snubber.

What is the reason for welding the shaft?

Jose

Ipanema SM 2K 278


 

With the shaft welded the sides cannot bend inward.

Bill
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Mon, Oct 5, 2020 at 11:47 AM Jose Venegas via groups.io <josegvenegas=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
Bill,

I use the secondary anchor roller to pass the snubber or the mooring line.  The two vertical rollers serve to reduce chafe when the line is not aligned with the boat.    However, in strong wind the flat cylinder shape of the secondary anchor roller allows sliding between the snubber and the roller creating chafe and strong sounds each time the snubber slides from one side to the other.
For this reason I would like to replace the secondary anchor roller to one that includes a wedge in the center and prevents the sliding of the snubber.

What is the reason for welding the shaft?

Jose

Ipanema SM 2K  278








Craig Briggs
 

... and the shaft cannot rotate with the roller and wear against the side holes.
--
SN68 Sangaris, Tropic Isle Harbor, FL


Dan Carlson
 

I second Karen's recco.

Our pin broke/fractured just inside. 

A machinist ground the outside welds of the he pin and it was all removed in less than 10 minutes.

He then cut two SS washers from 2 inch round stock, approx 2mm thick and milled it for the exact size of the replacement pin. He welded these onto the sides to give lots of reinforcement and the fabricated a new removable pin.

I believe that the welding made the original SS pin brittle causing it to break over time.

Best regards, Daniel Carlson on sv BeBe, sm #387


On Mon, Oct 5, 2020, 1:33 PM Craig Briggs via groups.io <sangaris=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
... and the shaft cannot rotate with the roller and wear against the side holes.
--
SN68 Sangaris, Tropic Isle Harbor, FL