Bali Hai Abandoned


Eric Freedman
 

I am surprised that Bali Hai was abandoned. Does anyone know the experience of the crew, Was Bali Hai ever recovered?

The seas did not seem so bad, I am sure that a Jordan Series drogue would have made the difference and she would still be floating with the same owners.

Fair Winds

ERIC

Kimberlite Amel SM 376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of CW Bill Rouse
Sent: Sunday, August 22, 2021 11:28 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io Notification <main@amelyachtowners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Super Maramu Rear Cabin - Proposed New Top hatch

 

Regrettably, Bali Hai was lost in the Atlantic near the US shore when the crew abandoned her.

 

Here are some photos of an aft cabin hatch install on a SM. I do not recommend the wooden outside spacer used in this modification. If an external spacer is used I believe it should be fabricated from GRP.

 

That coach roof is balsa filled, so any penetration should be done by experienced people and care should be taken that the exposed balsa in sealed correctly.

 


CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School

Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 

 

View My Training Calendar

 

On Sun, Aug 22, 2021 at 11:14 AM ianjenkins1946 <ianjudyjenkins@...> <ianjudyjenkins@...> wrote:

Hi George,

 

 You will not be the first to do this. There was an SM called Bali Hai, based in Malta, whose owners did the same. Since sold, I don't know where it is today.

 

 Ian and Judy, Pen Azen, SM 302, Kilada, Greece


From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of George Green via groups.io <gdagreen=yahoo.com@groups.io>
Sent: 22 August 2021 15:46
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Super Maramu Rear Cabin - Proposed New Top hatch

 

We love our 2004/5 SM COCO, currently on the hard in Greece.

As part of a post COVID set of upgrades while staying on the hard, we are considering installing a full size Lewmar style hatch, opening forward, on the roof of the rear master cabin, when we ,hopefully get back to Greece in mid-September. My wife finds it pretty hot in this cabin, at anchor in the summer due to little or no direct airflow.  Yes , we do have a wind scoop ,  which can be hooked through the rear hatch, but this has limited effectiveness.

If anyone has tried this, i would welcome their experiences and constructive comments, even alternate solutions   I am aware there is a a degree of slope on this deck roof which may involve some extra work.

Many thanks

George
Amel SM 434


Patrick McAneny
 

-----Original Message-----
From: eric freedman <kimberlite@...>
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Sent: Sun, Aug 22, 2021 5:00 pm
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Bali Hai Abandoned

I am surprised that Bali Hai was abandoned. Does anyone know the experience of the crew, Was Bali Hai ever recovered?
The seas did not seem so bad, I am sure that a Jordan Series drogue would have made the difference and she would still be floating with the same owners.
Fair Winds
ERIC
Kimberlite Amel SM 376
 
 
From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of CW Bill Rouse
Sent: Sunday, August 22, 2021 11:28 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io Notification <main@amelyachtowners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Super Maramu Rear Cabin - Proposed New Top hatch
 
Regrettably, Bali Hai was lost in the Atlantic near the US shore when the crew abandoned her.
 
Here are some photos of an aft cabin hatch install on a SM. I do not recommend the wooden outside spacer used in this modification. If an external spacer is used I believe it should be fabricated from GRP.
 
That coach roof is balsa filled, so any penetration should be done by experienced people and care should be taken that the exposed balsa in sealed correctly.
 

CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
 
 
On Sun, Aug 22, 2021 at 11:14 AM ianjenkins1946 <ianjudyjenkins@...> <ianjudyjenkins@...> wrote:
Hi George,
 
 You will not be the first to do this. There was an SM called Bali Hai, based in Malta, whose owners did the same. Since sold, I don't know where it is today.
 
 Ian and Judy, Pen Azen, SM 302, Kilada, Greece

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of George Green via groups.io <gdagreen=yahoo.com@groups.io>
Sent: 22 August 2021 15:46
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Super Maramu Rear Cabin - Proposed New Top hatch
 
We love our 2004/5 SM COCO, currently on the hard in Greece.

As part of a post COVID set of upgrades while staying on the hard, we are considering installing a full size Lewmar style hatch, opening forward, on the roof of the rear master cabin, when we ,hopefully get back to Greece in mid-September. My wife finds it pretty hot in this cabin, at anchor in the summer due to little or no direct airflow.  Yes , we do have a wind scoop ,  which can be hooked through the rear hatch, but this has limited effectiveness.

If anyone has tried this, i would welcome their experiences and constructive comments, even alternate solutions   I am aware there is a a degree of slope on this deck roof which may involve some extra work.

Many thanks

George
Amel SM 434


Justin Maguire
 

Was it ever cleared up as to what the problem was?


On Aug 24, 2021, at 13:24, Patrick McAneny via groups.io <sailw32@...> wrote:


The Bali Hai  incident happened Nov. 2020, not recently. 


Pat
SM Shenanigans


-----Original Message-----
From: eric freedman <kimberlite@...>
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Sent: Sun, Aug 22, 2021 5:00 pm
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Bali Hai Abandoned

I am surprised that Bali Hai was abandoned. Does anyone know the experience of the crew, Was Bali Hai ever recovered?
The seas did not seem so bad, I am sure that a Jordan Series drogue would have made the difference and she would still be floating with the same owners.
Fair Winds
ERIC
Kimberlite Amel SM 376
 
 
From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of CW Bill Rouse
Sent: Sunday, August 22, 2021 11:28 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io Notification <main@amelyachtowners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Super Maramu Rear Cabin - Proposed New Top hatch
 
Regrettably, Bali Hai was lost in the Atlantic near the US shore when the crew abandoned her.
 
Here are some photos of an aft cabin hatch install on a SM. I do not recommend the wooden outside spacer used in this modification. If an external spacer is used I believe it should be fabricated from GRP.
 
That coach roof is balsa filled, so any penetration should be done by experienced people and care should be taken that the exposed balsa in sealed correctly.
 
<image001.png>

<image002.png>
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
 
 
On Sun, Aug 22, 2021 at 11:14 AM ianjenkins1946 <ianjudyjenkins@...> <ianjudyjenkins@...> wrote:
Hi George,
 
 You will not be the first to do this. There was an SM called Bali Hai, based in Malta, whose owners did the same. Since sold, I don't know where it is today.
 
 Ian and Judy, Pen Azen, SM 302, Kilada, Greece

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of George Green via groups.io <gdagreen=yahoo.com@groups.io>
Sent: 22 August 2021 15:46
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Super Maramu Rear Cabin - Proposed New Top hatch
 
We love our 2004/5 SM COCO, currently on the hard in Greece.

As part of a post COVID set of upgrades while staying on the hard, we are considering installing a full size Lewmar style hatch, opening forward, on the roof of the rear master cabin, when we ,hopefully get back to Greece in mid-September. My wife finds it pretty hot in this cabin, at anchor in the summer due to little or no direct airflow.  Yes , we do have a wind scoop ,  which can be hooked through the rear hatch, but this has limited effectiveness.

If anyone has tried this, i would welcome their experiences and constructive comments, even alternate solutions   I am aware there is a a degree of slope on this deck roof which may involve some extra work.

Many thanks

George
Amel SM 434
<image002.png>
<image001.png>


Patrick McAneny
 

We met the owner a couple of times, he was out of Annapolis. It would be interesting to know the outcome,if he retrieved his boat.
Pat
SM Shenanigans
Sassafras River, Md.


-----Original Message-----
From: Justin Maguire <justin_maguire@...>
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io <main@amelyachtowners.groups.io>
Sent: Tue, Aug 24, 2021 5:08 pm
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Bali Hai Abandoned

Was it ever cleared up as to what the problem was?


On Aug 24, 2021, at 13:24, Patrick McAneny via groups.io <sailw32@...> wrote:


The Bali Hai  incident happened Nov. 2020, not recently. 


Pat
SM Shenanigans


-----Original Message-----
From: eric freedman <kimberlite@...>
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Sent: Sun, Aug 22, 2021 5:00 pm
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Bali Hai Abandoned

I am surprised that Bali Hai was abandoned. Does anyone know the experience of the crew, Was Bali Hai ever recovered?
The seas did not seem so bad, I am sure that a Jordan Series drogue would have made the difference and she would still be floating with the same owners.
Fair Winds
ERIC
Kimberlite Amel SM 376
 
 
From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of CW Bill Rouse
Sent: Sunday, August 22, 2021 11:28 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io Notification <main@amelyachtowners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Super Maramu Rear Cabin - Proposed New Top hatch
 
Regrettably, Bali Hai was lost in the Atlantic near the US shore when the crew abandoned her.
 
Here are some photos of an aft cabin hatch install on a SM. I do not recommend the wooden outside spacer used in this modification. If an external spacer is used I believe it should be fabricated from GRP.
 
That coach roof is balsa filled, so any penetration should be done by experienced people and care should be taken that the exposed balsa in sealed correctly.
 
<image001.png>

<image002.png>
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
 
 
On Sun, Aug 22, 2021 at 11:14 AM ianjenkins1946 <ianjudyjenkins@...> <ianjudyjenkins@...> wrote:
Hi George,
 
 You will not be the first to do this. There was an SM called Bali Hai, based in Malta, whose owners did the same. Since sold, I don't know where it is today.
 
 Ian and Judy, Pen Azen, SM 302, Kilada, Greece

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of George Green via groups.io <gdagreen=yahoo.com@groups.io>
Sent: 22 August 2021 15:46
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Super Maramu Rear Cabin - Proposed New Top hatch
 
We love our 2004/5 SM COCO, currently on the hard in Greece.

As part of a post COVID set of upgrades while staying on the hard, we are considering installing a full size Lewmar style hatch, opening forward, on the roof of the rear master cabin, when we ,hopefully get back to Greece in mid-September. My wife finds it pretty hot in this cabin, at anchor in the summer due to little or no direct airflow.  Yes , we do have a wind scoop ,  which can be hooked through the rear hatch, but this has limited effectiveness.

If anyone has tried this, i would welcome their experiences and constructive comments, even alternate solutions   I am aware there is a a degree of slope on this deck roof which may involve some extra work.

Many thanks

George
Amel SM 434
<image002.png>
<image001.png>


Mark Erdos
 

Certainly not being judgmental but, the conditions don’t seem life treating. The boat seems to be going along just fine with the stern into the weather. Was there other equipment failures?

 

The jumping into the water and being hoisted into a helicopter would scare me a hell of a lot more than riding out the weather.

 

What was the story on the boat? I can imagine it sunk. Was it found sailing along somewhere by itself?

 

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Patrick McAneny via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, August 24, 2021 10:24 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Bali Hai Abandoned

 

-----Original Message-----
From: eric freedman <kimberlite@...>
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Sent: Sun, Aug 22, 2021 5:00 pm
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Bali Hai Abandoned

I am surprised that Bali Hai was abandoned. Does anyone know the experience of the crew, Was Bali Hai ever recovered?

The seas did not seem so bad, I am sure that a Jordan Series drogue would have made the difference and she would still be floating with the same owners.

Fair Winds

ERIC

Kimberlite Amel SM 376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of CW Bill Rouse
Sent: Sunday, August 22, 2021 11:28 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io Notification <main@amelyachtowners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Super Maramu Rear Cabin - Proposed New Top hatch

 

Regrettably, Bali Hai was lost in the Atlantic near the US shore when the crew abandoned her.

 

Here are some photos of an aft cabin hatch install on a SM. I do not recommend the wooden outside spacer used in this modification. If an external spacer is used I believe it should be fabricated from GRP.

 

That coach roof is balsa filled, so any penetration should be done by experienced people and care should be taken that the exposed balsa in sealed correctly.

 


CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School

+1 832-380-4970 | brouse@...

Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 

 

 

On Sun, Aug 22, 2021 at 11:14 AM ianjenkins1946 <ianjudyjenkins@...> <ianjudyjenkins@...> wrote:

Hi George,

 

 You will not be the first to do this. There was an SM called Bali Hai, based in Malta, whose owners did the same. Since sold, I don't know where it is today.

 

 Ian and Judy, Pen Azen, SM 302, Kilada, Greece


From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of George Green via groups.io <gdagreen=yahoo.com@groups.io>
Sent: 22 August 2021 15:46
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Super Maramu Rear Cabin - Proposed New Top hatch

 

We love our 2004/5 SM COCO, currently on the hard in Greece.

As part of a post COVID set of upgrades while staying on the hard, we are considering installing a full size Lewmar style hatch, opening forward, on the roof of the rear master cabin, when we ,hopefully get back to Greece in mid-September. My wife finds it pretty hot in this cabin, at anchor in the summer due to little or no direct airflow.  Yes , we do have a wind scoop ,  which can be hooked through the rear hatch, but this has limited effectiveness.

If anyone has tried this, i would welcome their experiences and constructive comments, even alternate solutions   I am aware there is a a degree of slope on this deck roof which may involve some extra work.

Many thanks

George
Amel SM 434


Eric Freedman
 

The boat still had a bit of sail up and looking at the wave height I don’t think the wind was above 45 knots. In addition the story mentioned they were over 150 miles east of Hatteras. Lots of room to play.

Each person has their own limit when it comes to issues on the boat.

I believe there is more to this story.

Fair Winds

ERIC

Kimberlite Amel SM 376

 

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mark Erdos
Sent: Tuesday, August 24, 2021 9:02 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Bali Hai Abandoned

 

Certainly not being judgmental but, the conditions don’t seem life treating. The boat seems to be going along just fine with the stern into the weather. Was there other equipment failures?

 

The jumping into the water and being hoisted into a helicopter would scare me a hell of a lot more than riding out the weather.

 

What was the story on the boat? I can imagine it sunk. Was it found sailing along somewhere by itself?

 

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Patrick McAneny via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, August 24, 2021 10:24 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Bali Hai Abandoned

 

The Bali Hai  incident happened Nov. 2020, not recently. 

 

 

Pat

SM Shenanigans

-----Original Message-----
From: eric freedman <kimberlite@...>
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Sent: Sun, Aug 22, 2021 5:00 pm
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Bali Hai Abandoned

I am surprised that Bali Hai was abandoned. Does anyone know the experience of the crew, Was Bali Hai ever recovered?

The seas did not seem so bad, I am sure that a Jordan Series drogue would have made the difference and she would still be floating with the same owners.

Fair Winds

ERIC

Kimberlite Amel SM 376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of CW Bill Rouse
Sent: Sunday, August 22, 2021 11:28 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io Notification <main@amelyachtowners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Super Maramu Rear Cabin - Proposed New Top hatch

 

Regrettably, Bali Hai was lost in the Atlantic near the US shore when the crew abandoned her.

 

Here are some photos of an aft cabin hatch install on a SM. I do not recommend the wooden outside spacer used in this modification. If an external spacer is used I believe it should be fabricated from GRP.

 

That coach roof is balsa filled, so any penetration should be done by experienced people and care should be taken that the exposed balsa in sealed correctly.

 


CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School

+1 832-380-4970 | brouse@...

Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 

 

 

On Sun, Aug 22, 2021 at 11:14 AM ianjenkins1946 <ianjudyjenkins@...> <ianjudyjenkins@...> wrote:

Hi George,

 

 You will not be the first to do this. There was an SM called Bali Hai, based in Malta, whose owners did the same. Since sold, I don't know where it is today.

 

 Ian and Judy, Pen Azen, SM 302, Kilada, Greece


From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of George Green via groups.io <gdagreen=yahoo.com@groups.io>
Sent: 22 August 2021 15:46
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Super Maramu Rear Cabin - Proposed New Top hatch

 

We love our 2004/5 SM COCO, currently on the hard in Greece.

As part of a post COVID set of upgrades while staying on the hard, we are considering installing a full size Lewmar style hatch, opening forward, on the roof of the rear master cabin, when we ,hopefully get back to Greece in mid-September. My wife finds it pretty hot in this cabin, at anchor in the summer due to little or no direct airflow.  Yes , we do have a wind scoop ,  which can be hooked through the rear hatch, but this has limited effectiveness.

If anyone has tried this, i would welcome their experiences and constructive comments, even alternate solutions   I am aware there is a a degree of slope on this deck roof which may involve some extra work.

Many thanks

George
Amel SM 434


Paul Harries
 

There were likely other factors such as:
Profound sea sickness
Unable to deploy drone or sea anchor
Physical injuries from being thrown about
Psychological impact if skipper and Admiral disagree on strategy.

It is very interesting that even calm, collective individuals can have a change of mindset under adverse conditions when serial failures also occur. This pattern is often seen aviation disasters but also in other venues such as the operating room! Some have described it as a temporary brain fog, a bit like when we are lost but fail to accept the fact when reconciling assumed position with chart or map.


--
Paul Harries
Prospective Amel Buyer


Eric Freedman
 

Profound seasickness—interesting!

If you google “The one that got away” in ocean navigator there is an article about us and another boat.

A Canadian sailed south and was 400 miles from Puerto Rico when he called for help due to extreme dehydration. We were asked to assist. We were within 200 feet of a beautiful sailboat just bobbing in the sea. Without a skipper.

Unfortunately, the rescue ship took the boat in tow. When the tow broke, they gave us the position. After towing it for 8 hours we got there near sunset,

 

I was concerned about getting crew on board as it was getting dark soon. If they would have not taken it in tow, we would have sailed it to St Maarten and returned it to the boat owner without a salvage fee. My crew was very bummed out as we could have easily salvaged

her if it was not towed—The boat was named SCAT—what a name . It turned up in Jost van Dyk

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Paul Harries via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, August 24, 2021 9:25 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Bali Hai Abandoned

 

There were likely other factors such as:
Profound sea sickness

Unable to deploy drone or sea anchor

Physical injuries from being thrown about

Psychological impact if skipper and Admiral disagree on strategy.


It is very interesting that even calm, collective individuals can have a change of mindset under adverse conditions when serial failures also occur. This pattern is often seen aviation disasters but also in other venues such as the operating room! Some have described it as a temporary brain fog, a bit like when we are lost but fail to accept the fact when reconciling assumed position with chart or map.


--
Paul Harries
Prospective Amel Buyer


Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Yes it is interesting that in stress situations the boat is often more resilient than the crew and bad decisions are made. But unless you are there experiencing what they experience it is difficult to judge. However the availability of helicopter rescue is one factor that could allow crew to put unsustainable pressure on the skipper.  Wouldn't we all have loved to be there to pick up that boat. In my pre offshore briefings to the crew I tell them if something goes wrong we fix it. Not to even consider rescue,  because in our Pacific situation rescue could be 24 hours away and if we can survive the situation for 24 hours????

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 25 August 2021 at 15:46 eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:

Profound seasickness—interesting!

If you google “The one that got away” in ocean navigator there is an article about us and another boat.

A Canadian sailed south and was 400 miles from Puerto Rico when he called for help due to extreme dehydration. We were asked to assist. We were within 200 feet of a beautiful sailboat just bobbing in the sea. Without a skipper.

Unfortunately, the rescue ship took the boat in tow. When the tow broke, they gave us the position. After towing it for 8 hours we got there near sunset,

 

I was concerned about getting crew on board as it was getting dark soon. If they would have not taken it in tow, we would have sailed it to St Maarten and returned it to the boat owner without a salvage fee. My crew was very bummed out as we could have easily salvaged

her if it was not towed—The boat was named SCAT—what a name . It turned up in Jost van Dyk

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Paul Harries via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, August 24, 2021 9:25 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Bali Hai Abandoned

 

There were likely other factors such as:
Profound sea sickness

Unable to deploy drone or sea anchor

Physical injuries from being thrown about

Psychological impact if skipper and Admiral disagree on strategy.


It is very interesting that even calm, collective individuals can have a change of mindset under adverse conditions when serial failures also occur. This pattern is often seen aviation disasters but also in other venues such as the operating room! Some have described it as a temporary brain fog, a bit like when we are lost but fail to accept the fact when reconciling assumed position with chart or map.


--
Paul Harries
Prospective Amel Buyer

 



 


 


Justin Maguire
 

So there wasn’t a functional problem with the boat per se, just a crew at its limits?


On Aug 24, 2021, at 21:09, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@...> wrote:



Yes it is interesting that in stress situations the boat is often more resilient than the crew and bad decisions are made. But unless you are there experiencing what they experience it is difficult to judge. However the availability of helicopter rescue is one factor that could allow crew to put unsustainable pressure on the skipper.  Wouldn't we all have loved to be there to pick up that boat. In my pre offshore briefings to the crew I tell them if something goes wrong we fix it. Not to even consider rescue,  because in our Pacific situation rescue could be 24 hours away and if we can survive the situation for 24 hours????

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 25 August 2021 at 15:46 eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:

Profound seasickness—interesting!

If you google “The one that got away” in ocean navigator there is an article about us and another boat.

A Canadian sailed south and was 400 miles from Puerto Rico when he called for help due to extreme dehydration. We were asked to assist. We were within 200 feet of a beautiful sailboat just bobbing in the sea. Without a skipper.

Unfortunately, the rescue ship took the boat in tow. When the tow broke, they gave us the position. After towing it for 8 hours we got there near sunset,

 

I was concerned about getting crew on board as it was getting dark soon. If they would have not taken it in tow, we would have sailed it to St Maarten and returned it to the boat owner without a salvage fee. My crew was very bummed out as we could have easily salvaged

her if it was not towed—The boat was named SCAT—what a name . It turned up in Jost van Dyk

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Paul Harries via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, August 24, 2021 9:25 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Bali Hai Abandoned

 

There were likely other factors such as:
Profound sea sickness

Unable to deploy drone or sea anchor

Physical injuries from being thrown about

Psychological impact if skipper and Admiral disagree on strategy.


It is very interesting that even calm, collective individuals can have a change of mindset under adverse conditions when serial failures also occur. This pattern is often seen aviation disasters but also in other venues such as the operating room! Some have described it as a temporary brain fog, a bit like when we are lost but fail to accept the fact when reconciling assumed position with chart or map.


--
Paul Harries
Prospective Amel Buyer

 



 


 


Mohammad Shirloo
 

Here’s what the father of the rescue swimmer posted online:

 

 

Sondra Farley Mayfield

Capi Tan Lucky from what I was told is they were taking on water and had no power for a generator to run a sump. They were in 40 ft seas - it's hard to tell that from the angle of the video. During the rescue the boat was still drifting and drifted for 20 - 30 miles during the time they were accomplishing the rescue

 

 

Respectfully;

 

 

Mohammad and Aty

B&B Kokomo

Amel 54 #099

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mark Erdos via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, August 25, 2021 4:02 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Bali Hai Abandoned

 

Certainly not being judgmental but, the conditions don’t seem life treating. The boat seems to be going along just fine with the stern into the weather. Was there other equipment failures?

 

The jumping into the water and being hoisted into a helicopter would scare me a hell of a lot more than riding out the weather.

 

What was the story on the boat? I can imagine it sunk. Was it found sailing along somewhere by itself?

 

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Patrick McAneny via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, August 24, 2021 10:24 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Bali Hai Abandoned

 

The Bali Hai  incident happened Nov. 2020, not recently. 

 

 

Pat

SM Shenanigans

-----Original Message-----
From: eric freedman <kimberlite@...>
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Sent: Sun, Aug 22, 2021 5:00 pm
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Bali Hai Abandoned

I am surprised that Bali Hai was abandoned. Does anyone know the experience of the crew, Was Bali Hai ever recovered?

The seas did not seem so bad, I am sure that a Jordan Series drogue would have made the difference and she would still be floating with the same owners.

Fair Winds

ERIC

Kimberlite Amel SM 376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of CW Bill Rouse
Sent: Sunday, August 22, 2021 11:28 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io Notification <main@amelyachtowners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Super Maramu Rear Cabin - Proposed New Top hatch

 

Regrettably, Bali Hai was lost in the Atlantic near the US shore when the crew abandoned her.

 

Here are some photos of an aft cabin hatch install on a SM. I do not recommend the wooden outside spacer used in this modification. If an external spacer is used I believe it should be fabricated from GRP.

 

That coach roof is balsa filled, so any penetration should be done by experienced people and care should be taken that the exposed balsa in sealed correctly.

 


CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School

+1 832-380-4970 | brouse@...

Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 

 

 

On Sun, Aug 22, 2021 at 11:14 AM ianjenkins1946 <ianjudyjenkins@...> <ianjudyjenkins@...> wrote:

Hi George,

 

 You will not be the first to do this. There was an SM called Bali Hai, based in Malta, whose owners did the same. Since sold, I don't know where it is today.

 

 Ian and Judy, Pen Azen, SM 302, Kilada, Greece


From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of George Green via groups.io <gdagreen=yahoo.com@groups.io>
Sent: 22 August 2021 15:46
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Super Maramu Rear Cabin - Proposed New Top hatch

 

We love our 2004/5 SM COCO, currently on the hard in Greece.

As part of a post COVID set of upgrades while staying on the hard, we are considering installing a full size Lewmar style hatch, opening forward, on the roof of the rear master cabin, when we ,hopefully get back to Greece in mid-September. My wife finds it pretty hot in this cabin, at anchor in the summer due to little or no direct airflow.  Yes , we do have a wind scoop ,  which can be hooked through the rear hatch, but this has limited effectiveness.

If anyone has tried this, i would welcome their experiences and constructive comments, even alternate solutions   I am aware there is a a degree of slope on this deck roof which may involve some extra work.

Many thanks

George
Amel SM 434


JB Duler
 

It is very difficult to judge the crew based on third party reports. Anybody who has experienced extreme seasickness will tell you that they would have preferred to die.

We were caught in the same area in 1994, on a Swan 47, in the path of Huricane Gordon. We experienced 50 foot waves due to the combination of gulf stream current and wind in opposite directions. As we fell down a monstrous wave we broke the hydraulic of the back stay and the hydraulic boom vang. We rigged cable running backs we had ready to deploy. Then the furled genoa exploded and we had shredded pieces flying on the fore stay, the noise was unbelievable. It was pretty close to living hell.

We had a little storm sail on a second fore stay, just to surf the waves and to avoid being rolled over.

We were four of us, very experienced but very seasick. Vomit over over the galley and saloon, spilled pasta and tuna we had tried to cook. The smell was unbearable.

I tried to call the Coast Guard multiple times (a PanPan instead of Mayday, just to inform them of the situation and to talk to somebody). We could never connect with them, we were too far with only the VHF.

Since our SSB was down, and without news, my company triggered a search by the Coast Guards. We did not know that.

The Coasties saved the crew of a big Hinckley that was scared to death. The boat was lost.
The Coasties saved a couple off Hatteras. The sailboat was found the following year going in circles in the same area.

As for us they abandoned the search and informed my company that we had probably sunk with no chance to survive (we did! otherwise I would not here today to tell you the story).
I am told that when you die everybody says that you were the greatest and kindliest man on earth. So everybody mourned us.

After we finally landed in Fort Lauderdale we promised ourselves that we would never be again on a sailboat. EVER. But the following year we were together crossing the Pacific on a race to Hawaii.

Be kind to others if they get rescued, everybody has a different level of stamina, or just willingness to live.

--
John Bernard "JB" Duler
San Francisco
Meltem # 19, Western Med


Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

The photos seem to suggest that. As someone else commented with 170 miles sea room and a boat floating to its lines a failed engine seems a moderate problem. However as has-been said we were not there. 

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 25 August 2021 at 18:42 Justin Maguire <justin_maguire@...> wrote:

So there wasn’t a functional problem with the boat per se, just a crew at its limits?

 

On Aug 24, 2021, at 21:09, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@...> wrote:

Yes it is interesting that in stress situations the boat is often more resilient than the crew and bad decisions are made. But unless you are there experiencing what they experience it is difficult to judge. However the availability of helicopter rescue is one factor that could allow crew to put unsustainable pressure on the skipper.  Wouldn't we all have loved to be there to pick up that boat. In my pre offshore briefings to the crew I tell them if something goes wrong we fix it. Not to even consider rescue,  because in our Pacific situation rescue could be 24 hours away and if we can survive the situation for 24 hours????

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 25 August 2021 at 15:46 eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:

Profound seasickness—interesting!

If you google “The one that got away” in ocean navigator there is an article about us and another boat.

A Canadian sailed south and was 400 miles from Puerto Rico when he called for help due to extreme dehydration. We were asked to assist. We were within 200 feet of a beautiful sailboat just bobbing in the sea. Without a skipper.

Unfortunately, the rescue ship took the boat in tow. When the tow broke, they gave us the position. After towing it for 8 hours we got there near sunset,

 

I was concerned about getting crew on board as it was getting dark soon. If they would have not taken it in tow, we would have sailed it to St Maarten and returned it to the boat owner without a salvage fee. My crew was very bummed out as we could have easily salvaged

her if it was not towed—The boat was named SCAT—what a name . It turned up in Jost van Dyk

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Paul Harries via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, August 24, 2021 9:25 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Bali Hai Abandoned

 

There were likely other factors such as:
Profound sea sickness

Unable to deploy drone or sea anchor

Physical injuries from being thrown about

Psychological impact if skipper and Admiral disagree on strategy.


It is very interesting that even calm, collective individuals can have a change of mindset under adverse conditions when serial failures also occur. This pattern is often seen aviation disasters but also in other venues such as the operating room! Some have described it as a temporary brain fog, a bit like when we are lost but fail to accept the fact when reconciling assumed position with chart or map.


--
Paul Harries
Prospective Amel Buyer

 



 


 


 


 


Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Well said JB.

Danny

On 25 August 2021 at 19:01 JB Duler <jbduler@...> wrote:

It is very difficult to judge the crew based on third party reports. Anybody who has experienced extreme seasickness will tell you that they would have preferred to die.

We were caught in the same area in 1994, on a Swan 47, in the path of Huricane Gordon. We experienced 50 foot waves due to the combination of gulf stream current and wind in opposite directions. As we fell down a monstrous wave we broke the hydraulic of the back stay and the hydraulic boom vang. We rigged cable running backs we had ready to deploy. Then the furled genoa exploded and we had shredded pieces flying on the fore stay, the noise was unbelievable. It was pretty close to living hell.

We had a little storm sail on a second fore stay, just to surf the waves and to avoid being rolled over.

We were four of us, very experienced but very seasick. Vomit over over the galley and saloon, spilled pasta and tuna we had tried to cook. The smell was unbearable.

I tried to call the Coast Guard multiple times (a PanPan instead of Mayday, just to inform them of the situation and to talk to somebody). We could never connect with them, we were too far with only the VHF.

Since our SSB was down, and without news, my company triggered a search by the Coast Guards. We did not know that.

The Coasties saved the crew of a big Hinckley that was scared to death. The boat was lost.
The Coasties saved a couple off Hatteras. The sailboat was found the following year going in circles in the same area.

As for us they abandoned the search and informed my company that we had probably sunk with no chance to survive (we did! otherwise I would not here today to tell you the story).
I am told that when you die everybody says that you were the greatest and kindliest man on earth. So everybody mourned us.

After we finally landed in Fort Lauderdale we promised ourselves that we would never be again on a sailboat. EVER. But the following year we were together crossing the Pacific on a race to Hawaii.

Be kind to others if they get rescued, everybody has a different level of stamina, or just willingness to live.

--
John Bernard "JB" Duler
San Francisco
Meltem # 19, Western Med


Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi again JB. Just to.pick up on your promise to never go to sea again. A friend and I on a light displacement 6 tonne  42 ft racer cruiser got caught in a weather bomb 200 miles out from New Zealand on a return voyage from the Pacific. We sailed through it with a storm jib half rolled. 70 knot Wind. Breaking seas higher than our mast. One broke right over the boat at least two meters deep.  Another  hit the stern and drove the stern sideways 45 degrees with a huge whump.We survived and swore to never sail again. Memory is a funny thing and like you a year later we were off again. My mate was rock solid. Would sail anywhere with him

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 25 August 2021 at 19:01 JB Duler <jbduler@...> wrote:

It is very difficult to judge the crew based on third party reports. Anybody who has experienced extreme seasickness will tell you that they would have preferred to die.

We were caught in the same area in 1994, on a Swan 47, in the path of Huricane Gordon. We experienced 50 foot waves due to the combination of gulf stream current and wind in opposite directions. As we fell down a monstrous wave we broke the hydraulic of the back stay and the hydraulic boom vang. We rigged cable running backs we had ready to deploy. Then the furled genoa exploded and we had shredded pieces flying on the fore stay, the noise was unbelievable. It was pretty close to living hell.

We had a little storm sail on a second fore stay, just to surf the waves and to avoid being rolled over.

We were four of us, very experienced but very seasick. Vomit over over the galley and saloon, spilled pasta and tuna we had tried to cook. The smell was unbearable.

I tried to call the Coast Guard multiple times (a PanPan instead of Mayday, just to inform them of the situation and to talk to somebody). We could never connect with them, we were too far with only the VHF.

Since our SSB was down, and without news, my company triggered a search by the Coast Guards. We did not know that.

The Coasties saved the crew of a big Hinckley that was scared to death. The boat was lost.
The Coasties saved a couple off Hatteras. The sailboat was found the following year going in circles in the same area.

As for us they abandoned the search and informed my company that we had probably sunk with no chance to survive (we did! otherwise I would not here today to tell you the story).
I am told that when you die everybody says that you were the greatest and kindliest man on earth. So everybody mourned us.

After we finally landed in Fort Lauderdale we promised ourselves that we would never be again on a sailboat. EVER. But the following year we were together crossing the Pacific on a race to Hawaii.

Be kind to others if they get rescued, everybody has a different level of stamina, or just willingness to live.

--
John Bernard "JB" Duler
San Francisco
Meltem # 19, Western Med


Brent Cameron
 

The details are a little foggy but I recall that the rear solar panels that were mounted to the mizzen backstays came loose and were acting a huge wind vane weather cocking the boat into the wind. I believe that they couldn’t get the engine running for some reason and that the Genoa furler had gotten jammed as well. The skipper (nice guy, met him in Bermuda a couple of years previous to this) had broken some ribs in the attempt to get the boat under control and was in no condition to go aft to cut away the solar panel as it was mounted high on the mizzen backstays.  From the video you can see a bit of this. I never did get on Bali Hai so don’t know exactly how the panels were mounted but I recall discussions here or elsewhere about this detail. 

Having had broken ribs and a collapsed lung, I’m very aware of how incapacitating that is. Throw in getting tossed around in huge swells by a boat that is not under control and it would be hell on earth.  As we all know, if you lose the back stay, you will likely soon lose the mizzen and then the triatic which is holding up the main mast. A bunch of masts in the water and held to the boat in those conditions would be not easy to deal with in full health with a big crew.   I’d never dream of judging a skipper in those conditions who decided the lives of his crew (and himself) were more important than salvaging the boat with rescue at hand. It’s sad that the boat isn’t been found yet (to my knowledge) but it could have been much worse. 

I think severe seasickness is somehow like childbirth for women. You think you are going to die and swear that you will never go through it again and then somehow you gloss all over it and head right back into the breach (no pun intended) again. :-) (Speaking only as someone who has watched a woman he put in that situation 5 times go through it) . Every time that I get badly seasick, I swear I’m done with it but as soon as my stomach gets under control (even before the voyage is over), I’m raring to go back out again!  The mind plays wonderful tricks on us to get us to do things we love to do! 

Brent Cameron
Future Amel owner & Amel Owner's Registry Moderator

On Aug 25, 2021, 5:40 AM -0700, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@...>, wrote:

Hi again JB. Just to.pick up on your promise to never go to sea again. A friend and I on a light displacement 6 tonne 42 ft racer cruiser got caught in a weather bomb 200 miles out from New Zealand on a return voyage from the Pacific. We sailed through it with a storm jib half rolled. 70 knot Wind. Breaking seas higher than our mast. One broke right over the boat at least two meters deep. Another hit the stern and drove the stern sideways 45 degrees with a huge whump.We survived and swore to never sail again. Memory is a funny thing and like you a year later we were off again. My mate was rock solid. Would sail anywhere with him

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 25 August 2021 at 19:01 JB Duler <jbduler@...> wrote:

It is very difficult to judge the crew based on third party reports. Anybody who has experienced extreme seasickness will tell you that they would have preferred to die.

We were caught in the same area in 1994, on a Swan 47, in the path of Huricane Gordon. We experienced 50 foot waves due to the combination of gulf stream current and wind in opposite directions. As we fell down a monstrous wave we broke the hydraulic of the back stay and the hydraulic boom vang. We rigged cable running backs we had ready to deploy. Then the furled genoa exploded and we had shredded pieces flying on the fore stay, the noise was unbelievable. It was pretty close to living hell.

We had a little storm sail on a second fore stay, just to surf the waves and to avoid being rolled over.

We were four of us, very experienced but very seasick. Vomit over over the galley and saloon, spilled pasta and tuna we had tried to cook. The smell was unbearable.

I tried to call the Coast Guard multiple times (a PanPan instead of Mayday, just to inform them of the situation and to talk to somebody). We could never connect with them, we were too far with only the VHF.

Since our SSB was down, and without news, my company triggered a search by the Coast Guards. We did not know that.

The Coasties saved the crew of a big Hinckley that was scared to death. The boat was lost.
The Coasties saved a couple off Hatteras. The sailboat was found the following year going in circles in the same area.

As for us they abandoned the search and informed my company that we had probably sunk with no chance to survive (we did! otherwise I would not here today to tell you the story).
I am told that when you die everybody says that you were the greatest and kindliest man on earth. So everybody mourned us.

After we finally landed in Fort Lauderdale we promised ourselves that we would never be again on a sailboat. EVER. But the following year we were together crossing the Pacific on a race to Hawaii.

Be kind to others if they get rescued, everybody has a different level of stamina, or just willingness to live.

--
John Bernard "JB" Duler
San Francisco
Meltem # 19, Western Med

--
Brent Cameron

Future Amel Owner & Amel Owner Registry Moderator

Oro-Medonte, Ontario, Canada


Rick Stanley
 

Also not being judgemental...but seems to me it would be significantly better to heave to for 24 hours. Or, 48 hours. Or however long it takes to sort out the issue enough to carry on sailing, even if that means heading right for the nearest port. Abandoning ship seems extreme to me -- unless there's an immediate life threatening medical condition onboard (heart attack, etc). Curious to know what happened.

Rick
S/V Althea
AMEL SM2K #317


Paul Harries
 

Out of curiosity has anyone else had problems with solar arch mounted panels in heavy conditions?
--
Paul Harries
Prospective Amel Buyer


Eric Freedman
 

Having been underwater on Kimberlite, I would never install a solar arch, or a panel open to the weather.

I really like the idea of mounting solar panels on a hard dodger as Ian Jenkins did on his  boat Pen Azen.

 

I would NEVER go to sea without a Jordan series drogue. It turns terrible conditions to a walk in the park.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io On Behalf Of Paul Harries via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, August 25, 2021 2:07 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Bali Hai Abandoned

 

Out of curiosity has anyone else had problems with solar arch mounted panels in heavy conditions?
--
Paul Harries
Prospective Amel Buyer


Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Thanks Brent for remining us again of the truth that if you aren't there you have no idea what the crew are going through.

One thing I want to pick up on. If I had had things stored on deck, fuel and life raft for example or solar panels on an arch when I had seas breaking over my 42 footer they would possibly have been torn away and if so highly likely we would have been lost. I know a lot of amelians are stacking ever greater numbers of solar panels on huge arches.

Most of us will never experience the life threatening situations but if we plan on ocean crossings we need to ensure we have the boat in a state that does not compromise it's survival ability. Keep the decks clear and be careful what you hang high

As to calling for rescue. On another return voyage on the same 42 ft boat we were dismasted 600 miles from Fiji and New Zealand. We were a 5 man race crew and very skilled.

But as skipper I felt a huge responsibility and if needed for crew safety I would have abandoned the boat for rescue in the blink of an eye.

But we dropped the mast into the watery deep along with my nice new mainsail. We rigged the boom as a mast. Put the storm jib in front and the tri sail behind and sailed the 600 miles home in six days. We got into our home port an hour before a gale hit.

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 26 August 2021 at 02:32 "Brent Cameron via groups.io" <brentcameron61@...> wrote:

The details are a little foggy but I recall that the rear solar panels that were mounted to the mizzen backstays came loose and were acting a huge wind vane weather cocking the boat into the wind. I believe that they couldn’t get the engine running for some reason and that the Genoa furler had gotten jammed as well. The skipper (nice guy, met him in Bermuda a couple of years previous to this) had broken some ribs in the attempt to get the boat under control and was in no condition to go aft to cut away the solar panel as it was mounted high on the mizzen backstays.  From the video you can see a bit of this. I never did get on Bali Hai so don’t know exactly how the panels were mounted but I recall discussions here or elsewhere about this detail. 

Having had broken ribs and a collapsed lung, I’m very aware of how incapacitating that is. Throw in getting tossed around in huge swells by a boat that is not under control and it would be hell on earth.  As we all know, if you lose the back stay, you will likely soon lose the mizzen and then the triatic which is holding up the main mast. A bunch of masts in the water and held to the boat in those conditions would be not easy to deal with in full health with a big crew.   I’d never dream of judging a skipper in those conditions who decided the lives of his crew (and himself) were more important than salvaging the boat with rescue at hand. It’s sad that the boat isn’t been found yet (to my knowledge) but it could have been much worse. 

I think severe seasickness is somehow like childbirth for women. You think you are going to die and swear that you will never go through it again and then somehow you gloss all over it and head right back into the breach (no pun intended) again. :-) (Speaking only as someone who has watched a woman he put in that situation 5 times go through it) . Every time that I get badly seasick, I swear I’m done with it but as soon as my stomach gets under control (even before the voyage is over), I’m raring to go back out again!  The mind plays wonderful tricks on us to get us to do things we love to do! 

Brent Cameron
Future Amel owner & Amel Owner's Registry Moderator
On Aug 25, 2021, 5:40 AM -0700, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@...>, wrote:

Hi again JB. Just to.pick up on your promise to never go to sea again. A friend and I on a light displacement 6 tonne 42 ft racer cruiser got caught in a weather bomb 200 miles out from New Zealand on a return voyage from the Pacific. We sailed through it with a storm jib half rolled. 70 knot Wind. Breaking seas higher than our mast. One broke right over the boat at least two meters deep. Another hit the stern and drove the stern sideways 45 degrees with a huge whump.We survived and swore to never sail again. Memory is a funny thing and like you a year later we were off again. My mate was rock solid. Would sail anywhere with him

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 25 August 2021 at 19:01 JB Duler <jbduler@...> wrote:

It is very difficult to judge the crew based on third party reports. Anybody who has experienced extreme seasickness will tell you that they would have preferred to die.

We were caught in the same area in 1994, on a Swan 47, in the path of Huricane Gordon. We experienced 50 foot waves due to the combination of gulf stream current and wind in opposite directions. As we fell down a monstrous wave we broke the hydraulic of the back stay and the hydraulic boom vang. We rigged cable running backs we had ready to deploy. Then the furled genoa exploded and we had shredded pieces flying on the fore stay, the noise was unbelievable. It was pretty close to living hell.

We had a little storm sail on a second fore stay, just to surf the waves and to avoid being rolled over.

We were four of us, very experienced but very seasick. Vomit over over the galley and saloon, spilled pasta and tuna we had tried to cook. The smell was unbearable.

I tried to call the Coast Guard multiple times (a PanPan instead of Mayday, just to inform them of the situation and to talk to somebody). We could never connect with them, we were too far with only the VHF.

Since our SSB was down, and without news, my company triggered a search by the Coast Guards. We did not know that.

The Coasties saved the crew of a big Hinckley that was scared to death. The boat was lost.
The Coasties saved a couple off Hatteras. The sailboat was found the following year going in circles in the same area.

As for us they abandoned the search and informed my company that we had probably sunk with no chance to survive (we did! otherwise I would not here today to tell you the story).
I am told that when you die everybody says that you were the greatest and kindliest man on earth. So everybody mourned us.

After we finally landed in Fort Lauderdale we promised ourselves that we would never be again on a sailboat. EVER. But the following year we were together crossing the Pacific on a race to Hawaii.

Be kind to others if they get rescued, everybody has a different level of stamina, or just willingness to live.

--
John Bernard "JB" Duler
San Francisco
Meltem # 19, Western Med


 


--
Brent Cameron

Future Amel Owner & Amel Owner Registry Moderator

Oro-Medonte, Ontario, Canada