Topics

Bottom paint removal problem

Mark Pitt
 

I have owned my Super Maramu since she was launched in 2003.  Amel applied a hard bottom paint before launch in 2003 but since then I have only used ablative paint.  The layer is now thick and a bit uneven.  Having carefully examined the words of caution on the Amel owners group, particularly those of Joel Potter, I have looked in vain for a soda blaster to remove all the old bottom paint. I just cannot find one in Rhode Island.  The contractor recommended by my Rhode Island marina uses glass and is apparently very experienced with blasting boat bottoms. 

Last week I contacted the large Hinckley repair yard in Portsmouth, RI and it turns out that they do not have access to soda blasting either and use the same glass blasting contractor used by the full service marina where Sabbatical III is stored.  Hinckley recommends the glass blasting followed by 5 coats of epoxy (the 5 coats is their rule for European boats).  My yard has suggested 3 coats of epoxy as a water barrier.
I had been hoping for soda blasting plus a single coat of epoxy as a primer, on the assumption that the barrier coat under the gel coat would remain intact.  I did not expect that it would not be possible to find a soda blasting contractor in Rhode Island (or nearby Massachusetts) who works on boat hulls.
 
Any suggestions for me?  I feel stuck and am inclined to use glass blasting following by 3 or more coats of epoxy as a barrier coat.
 
Mark Pitt
“Sabbatical III”, SM#419, Wickford, Rhode Island, USA
 

Aras
 

You can buy a soda blaster attachment cheaply enough & soda.  I got mine for under 300.
Aras 
1988 Sharki #163

Doug Smith
 

Soda blasting is available in the Chesapeake, if not urgent and if you are heading south in the near future. 
I had a previous boat soda blasted a few years ago in Deale Maryland. 

Thanks, Doug Smith

Amel 54-113, Aventura
Dugsmith98@...

On Feb 25, 2020, at 2:29 PM, Mark Pitt <mark_pitt@...> wrote:


I have owned my Super Maramu since she was launched in 2003.  Amel applied a hard bottom paint before launch in 2003 but since then I have only used ablative paint.  The layer is now thick and a bit uneven.  Having carefully examined the words of caution on the Amel owners group, particularly those of Joel Potter, I have looked in vain for a soda blaster to remove all the old bottom paint. I just cannot find one in Rhode Island.  The contractor recommended by my Rhode Island marina uses glass and is apparently very experienced with blasting boat bottoms. 

Last week I contacted the large Hinckley repair yard in Portsmouth, RI and it turns out that they do not have access to soda blasting either and use the same glass blasting contractor used by the full service marina where Sabbatical III is stored.  Hinckley recommends the glass blasting followed by 5 coats of epoxy (the 5 coats is their rule for European boats).  My yard has suggested 3 coats of epoxy as a water barrier.
I had been hoping for soda blasting plus a single coat of epoxy as a primer, on the assumption that the barrier coat under the gel coat would remain intact.  I did not expect that it would not be possible to find a soda blasting contractor in Rhode Island (or nearby Massachusetts) who works on boat hulls.
 
Any suggestions for me?  I feel stuck and am inclined to use glass blasting following by 3 or more coats of epoxy as a barrier coat.
 
Mark Pitt
“Sabbatical III”, SM#419, Wickford, Rhode Island, USA
 

Miles
 

Hi Mark,

 

I used a chemical paint remover and it worked well.  I don’t recall which product I used.  Practical Sailor  has done thorough comparison tests of the various products.  There are contractors around NEB (now Safe Harbor) who will do it.   This method will, of course, not hurt the outer gel coat and the Amel water barrier.  I remember being surprised at the amount and the weight of the paint that came off.  They had to apply the stuff several times to get all of the paint off.   

 

Regards,

 

Miles  s/y Ladybug, Le Marin. Martinique

Mark McGovern
 

As Doug said, it's not close to your desired location but there is a good company that does hull soda-blasting located at our marina Herrington Harbor North located in Deale, MD (~20 miles south of Annapolis) that has over 25 years experience soda blasting hulls and even some experience with Amels.  I had them take our hull down to the gelcoat last winter.  They did a very thorough yet careful job removing most of the remnants of ~15 years of various bottom paints.  Just be sure to "remind" them that you have a cast iron keel.  

Here is their contact information:

OSPREY MARINE COMPOSITES
301-261-9201 • 410-867-3022 • FX 301-261-5370
www.ospreycomposites.com • jj@...

--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD USA

Patrick McAneny
 

Mark, I have many dry layers of paint and have wanted to get down to a clean hull. Do you remember what it cost. I got a quote of $6,000. for sand blasting in Rock Hall ,Md.
Thanks,
Pat
SM#123


-----Original Message-----
From: Mark McGovern <mfmcgovern@...>
To: main <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Sent: Tue, Feb 25, 2020 5:17 pm
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Bottom paint removal problem

As Doug said, it's not close to your desired location but there is a good company that does hull soda-blasting located at our marina Herrington Harbor North located in Deale, MD (~20 miles south of Annapolis) that has over 25 years experience soda blasting hulls and even some experience with Amels.  I had them take our hull down to the gelcoat last winter.  They did a very thorough yet careful job removing most of the remnants of ~15 years of various bottom paints.  Just be sure to "remind" them that you have a cast iron keel.  

Here is their contact information:

OSPREY MARINE COMPOSITES
301-261-9201 • 410-867-3022 • FX 301-261-5370
www.ospreycomposites.com • jj@...

--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD USA

Mark McGovern
 

Pat,

I have the exact amount somewhere but I do remember that it was under $3000.  I will check and let you know.

--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD USA

Mark McGovern
 

Pat,

The cost was $2,861.52.  It was done in December 2018.  That does not include the cost of haul-out and re-launch.  That is just the cost from Osprey to do the soda blasting of the hull. 
  
Mark

--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD USA

Patrick McAneny
 

Mark, That is far better than what I've been quoted. Did you have the keel taken down to bare metal? I have some rust and would like to seal it , I wish it was encapsulated lead , iron and water don't mix well. I don't know how one would deal with bottom of the keel,unless it could be arranged to be left in a sling for a couple of days . 
Thanks,
Pat


-----Original Message-----
From: Mark McGovern <mfmcgovern@...>
To: main <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Sent: Tue, Feb 25, 2020 6:10 pm
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Bottom paint removal problem

Pat,

The cost was $2,861.52.  It was done in December 2018.  That does not include the cost of haul-out and re-launch.  That is just the cost from Osprey to do the soda blasting of the hull. 
  
Mark

--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD USA

Mark McGovern
 

Pat,

I did not have them blast the keel down to bare metal.  However, they did have to epoxy coat the keel right after blasting since there were some spots where the iron was already exposed before soda blasting and the soda blasting exposed a few more spots.  Thus my comment to "remind" whoever does the soda blasting that it is an iron keel so that they are ready to apply epoxy paint immediately after blasting.  The Iron starts to rust the instant it is exposed.  I ended up doing some more extensive grinding/sanding and epoxy coating to iron keel after their work was done.  Working on the bottom of the keel is NOT fun.  In hindsight, I probably should have just had them do it but I am cheap and a bit pigheaded about these things sometimes.

--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD USA

Aras
 

Yes I feel the same way.  Never again shall I attempt to do my bottom.  I tried using coppercoat with dismal success.  Worse was the lac of support.  Needless to say, it's time to redo my bottom and I will gladly pay to have it done; one collapsed lung lung enough for me.

Aras
1988 Sharki #163

Doug Smith
 

Yes, Osprey did mine as well, but I had them use sand blasting on the metal keel. They use a tent to keep containment of the sand, soda and paint that is removed.  Like Mark, I did the coating and repainting myself.  For the keel, Osprey finished the sand blasting and stepped back, and I immediately did a prep wipe down of the metal and coated the keel with the interlux 2000 epoxy.  Within minutes is key.  You can coat the whole keel with two people in under 30 minutes with rollers and brushes.  Then once it is coated, you do it again.  I ended up with 4 coats of interlux and the keel lasted 10 years with only an occasional rust break through the coating.

 

This is what Osprey does, and they work on super big boats.  They are more than willing to let you do part of the work, and helpful with advice if you have questions.

 

Doug Smith

S/V Aventura, Amel 54-113

Currently Gibraltar, Queensway Quay Marina

 

From: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of Mark McGovern <mfmcgovern@...>
Reply-To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Date: Wednesday, February 26, 2020 at 9:07 AM
To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Bottom paint removal problem

 

Pat,

I did not have them blast the keel down to bare metal.  However, they did have to epoxy coat the keel right after blasting since there were some spots where the iron was already exposed before soda blasting and the soda blasting exposed a few more spots.  Thus my comment to "remind" whoever does the soda blasting that it is an iron keel so that they are ready to apply epoxy paint immediately after blasting.  The Iron starts to rust the instant it is exposed.  I ended up doing some more extensive grinding/sanding and epoxy coating to iron keel after their work was done.  Working on the bottom of the keel is NOT fun.  In hindsight, I probably should have just had them do it but I am cheap and a bit pigheaded about these things sometimes.

--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD USA

eric freedman
 

Hi Mark,
After 16 years I had the bottom of Kimberlite cleaned down to the gelcoat. I did not want to use any form of blasting. I had the yard use a chemical stripper available at Home depot to remove paint down to the gelcoat. It took time and multiple applications but it worked and the bottom came up quite clean. I think the paint we removed weighed somewhere between 3 and 400 pounds and it was ablative paint..
I then had the yard apply 4 coats of interprotect . They then applied a hard epoxy blue paint and then 2 coats of black ablative paint. worked great . We hauled this year after 2 years and the bottom was beautiful. I would suggest using the chemical stripper when it is warm as it is a chemical process.
Fair Winds,
Eric
SM 376 Kimberlite

On February 25, 2020 at 2:28 PM Mark Pitt <mark_pitt@...> wrote:

I have owned my Super Maramu since she was launched in 2003.  Amel applied a hard bottom paint before launch in 2003 but since then I have only used ablative paint.  The layer is now thick and a bit uneven.  Having carefully examined the words of caution on the Amel owners group, particularly those of Joel Potter, I have looked in vain for a soda blaster to remove all the old bottom paint. I just cannot find one in Rhode Island.  The contractor recommended by my Rhode Island marina uses glass and is apparently very experienced with blasting boat bottoms. 

Last week I contacted the large Hinckley repair yard in Portsmouth, RI and it turns out that they do not have access to soda blasting either and use the same glass blasting contractor used by the full service marina where Sabbatical III is stored.  Hinckley recommends the glass blasting followed by 5 coats of epoxy (the 5 coats is their rule for European boats).  My yard has suggested 3 coats of epoxy as a water barrier.
I had been hoping for soda blasting plus a single coat of epoxy as a primer, on the assumption that the barrier coat under the gel coat would remain intact.  I did not expect that it would not be possible to find a soda blasting contractor in Rhode Island (or nearby Massachusetts) who works on boat hulls.
 
Any suggestions for me?  I feel stuck and am inclined to use glass blasting following by 3 or more coats of epoxy as a barrier coat.
 
Mark Pitt
“Sabbatical III”, SM#419, Wickford, Rhode Island, USA
 

 

ianjenkins1946 <ianjudyjenkins@hotmail.com>
 

Hi Mark,

  I  do wonder if there is much difference between soda and other dry materials. For what it's worth we had our hull cleaned with dry sand in the UK when the boat was 10 years old.  The old paint was taken off within a few hours and the hull looked as though it had just come out of the mould. So perfect was the gelcoat that it needed a light abrasion before a couple of layers of clear epoxy were put on. In our case that was sufficient as we then put on Coppercoat, itself an epoxy.

 Ian and Judy, Pen Azen, SM 302 Kilada, Greece


From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of Mark Pitt <mark_pitt@...>
Sent: 25 February 2020 19:28
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Bottom paint removal problem
 
I have owned my Super Maramu since she was launched in 2003.  Amel applied a hard bottom paint before launch in 2003 but since then I have only used ablative paint.  The layer is now thick and a bit uneven.  Having carefully examined the words of caution on the Amel owners group, particularly those of Joel Potter, I have looked in vain for a soda blaster to remove all the old bottom paint. I just cannot find one in Rhode Island.  The contractor recommended by my Rhode Island marina uses glass and is apparently very experienced with blasting boat bottoms. 

Last week I contacted the large Hinckley repair yard in Portsmouth, RI and it turns out that they do not have access to soda blasting either and use the same glass blasting contractor used by the full service marina where Sabbatical III is stored.  Hinckley recommends the glass blasting followed by 5 coats of epoxy (the 5 coats is their rule for European boats).  My yard has suggested 3 coats of epoxy as a water barrier.
I had been hoping for soda blasting plus a single coat of epoxy as a primer, on the assumption that the barrier coat under the gel coat would remain intact.  I did not expect that it would not be possible to find a soda blasting contractor in Rhode Island (or nearby Massachusetts) who works on boat hulls.
 
Any suggestions for me?  I feel stuck and am inclined to use glass blasting following by 3 or more coats of epoxy as a barrier coat.
 
Mark Pitt
“Sabbatical III”, SM#419, Wickford, Rhode Island, USA
 

eric freedman
 

Hi,

I had my bottom chemically stripped,

4 coats of Interprotect and 3 coats of bottom paint here in Huntington NY for 5,000 + materials.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Patrick McAneny via Groups.Io
Sent: Tuesday, February 25, 2020 5:55 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Bottom paint removal problem

 

Mark, I have many dry layers of paint and have wanted to get down to a clean hull. Do you remember what it cost. I got a quote of $6,000. for sand blasting in Rock Hall ,Md.

Thanks,

Pat

SM#123

-----Original Message-----
From: Mark McGovern <mfmcgovern@...>
To: main <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Sent: Tue, Feb 25, 2020 5:17 pm
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Bottom paint removal problem

As Doug said, it's not close to your desired location but there is a good company that does hull soda-blasting located at our marina Herrington Harbor North located in Deale, MD (~20 miles south of Annapolis) that has over 25 years experience soda blasting hulls and even some experience with Amels.  I had them take our hull down to the gelcoat last winter.  They did a very thorough yet careful job removing most of the remnants of ~15 years of various bottom paints.  Just be sure to "remind" them that you have a cast iron keel.  

Here is their contact information:

OSPREY MARINE COMPOSITES

301-261-9201 • 410-867-3022 • FX 301-261-5370

www.ospreycomposites.com • jj@...

--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD USA

Petaris
 

Hi Mark,

I wasn't aware of soda blasting so thanks for the new info!  The equipment looks fairly cheap as does the blasting soda.  Maybe you could just do it yourself if the yard allows it?  You would need a way to contain the dust and old bottom paint being blasted off but heavy plastic or cloth drop cloths should work for that.

Thank you,
Justin
Hopeful future SM/SM2k owner


On Tue, Feb 25, 2020 at 1:28 PM Mark Pitt <mark_pitt@...> wrote:
I have owned my Super Maramu since she was launched in 2003.  Amel applied a hard bottom paint before launch in 2003 but since then I have only used ablative paint.  The layer is now thick and a bit uneven.  Having carefully examined the words of caution on the Amel owners group, particularly those of Joel Potter, I have looked in vain for a soda blaster to remove all the old bottom paint. I just cannot find one in Rhode Island.  The contractor recommended by my Rhode Island marina uses glass and is apparently very experienced with blasting boat bottoms. 

Last week I contacted the large Hinckley repair yard in Portsmouth, RI and it turns out that they do not have access to soda blasting either and use the same glass blasting contractor used by the full service marina where Sabbatical III is stored.  Hinckley recommends the glass blasting followed by 5 coats of epoxy (the 5 coats is their rule for European boats).  My yard has suggested 3 coats of epoxy as a water barrier.
I had been hoping for soda blasting plus a single coat of epoxy as a primer, on the assumption that the barrier coat under the gel coat would remain intact.  I did not expect that it would not be possible to find a soda blasting contractor in Rhode Island (or nearby Massachusetts) who works on boat hulls.
 
Any suggestions for me?  I feel stuck and am inclined to use glass blasting following by 3 or more coats of epoxy as a barrier coat.
 
Mark Pitt
“Sabbatical III”, SM#419, Wickford, Rhode Island, USA
 



--
Justin Paulsen
IT Professional

"The world is open, are you?"

Patrick McAneny
 

Eric, I need to remove 20 some years of paint. Do you remember the name of the product you bought from Home Depot ? Was it meant to be used on fiberglass? Have any idea as to the man hours to strip your boat. Thinking I may hire a helper or two and tackle it myself.
Thanks,
Pat


-----Original Message-----
From: eric freedman <kimberlite@...>
To: main <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>; Mark Pitt <mark_pitt@...>
Sent: Wed, Feb 26, 2020 12:06 pm
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Bottom paint removal problem

Hi Mark,
After 16 years I had the bottom of Kimberlite cleaned down to the gelcoat. I did not want to use any form of blasting. I had the yard use a chemical stripper available at Home depot to remove paint down to the gelcoat. It took time and multiple applications but it worked and the bottom came up quite clean. I think the paint we removed weighed somewhere between 3 and 400 pounds and it was ablative paint..
I then had the yard apply 4 coats of interprotect . They then applied a hard epoxy blue paint and then 2 coats of black ablative paint. worked great . We hauled this year after 2 years and the bottom was beautiful. I would suggest using the chemical stripper when it is warm as it is a chemical process.
Fair Winds,
Eric
SM 376 Kimberlite

On February 25, 2020 at 2:28 PM Mark Pitt <mark_pitt@...> wrote:

I have owned my Super Maramu since she was launched in 2003.  Amel applied a hard bottom paint before launch in 2003 but since then I have only used ablative paint.  The layer is now thick and a bit uneven.  Having carefully examined the words of caution on the Amel owners group, particularly those of Joel Potter, I have looked in vain for a soda blaster to remove all the old bottom paint. I just cannot find one in Rhode Island.  The contractor recommended by my Rhode Island marina uses glass and is apparently very experienced with blasting boat bottoms. 

Last week I contacted the large Hinckley repair yard in Portsmouth, RI and it turns out that they do not have access to soda blasting either and use the same glass blasting contractor used by the full service marina where Sabbatical III is stored.  Hinckley recommends the glass blasting followed by 5 coats of epoxy (the 5 coats is their rule for European boats).  My yard has suggested 3 coats of epoxy as a water barrier.
I had been hoping for soda blasting plus a single coat of epoxy as a primer, on the assumption that the barrier coat under the gel coat would remain intact.  I did not expect that it would not be possible to find a soda blasting contractor in Rhode Island (or nearby Massachusetts) who works on boat hulls.
 
Any suggestions for me?  I feel stuck and am inclined to use glass blasting following by 3 or more coats of epoxy as a barrier coat.
 
Mark Pitt
“Sabbatical III”, SM#419, Wickford, Rhode Island, USA
 

 

eric freedman
 

Hi Pat,

I do not remember the name. I will try to get the name for you tomorrow.

It took 2 yard workers 4 days to strip and sand.

It is best applied in a warm environment as it is a chemical reaction.

I did mine in July. They used cheap brushes and scrapers for the majority of the work and then putty knives when they got close to the gel coat. It takes multiple applications and waiting time for this stripper to work.

They then used a sander to complete the job. It wasn’t difficult just time consuming.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Patrick McAneny via Groups.Io
Sent: Wednesday, March 04, 2020 6:30 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Bottom paint removal problem

 

Eric, I need to remove 20 some years of paint. Do you remember the name of the product you bought from Home Depot ? Was it meant to be used on fiberglass? Have any idea as to the man hours to strip your boat. Thinking I may hire a helper or two and tackle it myself.

Thanks,

Pat

-----Original Message-----
From: eric freedman <kimberlite@...>
To: main <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>; Mark Pitt <mark_pitt@...>
Sent: Wed, Feb 26, 2020 12:06 pm
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Bottom paint removal problem

Hi Mark,
After 16 years I had the bottom of Kimberlite cleaned down to the gelcoat. I did not want to use any form of blasting. I had the yard use a chemical stripper available at Home depot to remove paint down to the gelcoat. It took time and multiple applications but it worked and the bottom came up quite clean. I think the paint we removed weighed somewhere between 3 and 400 pounds and it was ablative paint..
I then had the yard apply 4 coats of interprotect . They then applied a hard epoxy blue paint and then 2 coats of black ablative paint. worked great . We hauled this year after 2 years and the bottom was beautiful. I would suggest using the chemical stripper when it is warm as it is a chemical process.
Fair Winds,
Eric
SM 376 Kimberlite


On February 25, 2020 at 2:28 PM Mark Pitt <mark_pitt@...> wrote:

I have owned my Super Maramu since she was launched in 2003.  Amel applied a hard bottom paint before launch in 2003 but since then I have only used ablative paint.  The layer is now thick and a bit uneven.  Having carefully examined the words of caution on the Amel owners group, particularly those of Joel Potter, I have looked in vain for a soda blaster to remove all the old bottom paint. I just cannot find one in Rhode Island.  The contractor recommended by my Rhode Island marina uses glass and is apparently very experienced with blasting boat bottoms. 

Last week I contacted the large Hinckley repair yard in Portsmouth, RI and it turns out that they do not have access to soda blasting either and use the same glass blasting contractor used by the full service marina where Sabbatical III is stored.  Hinckley recommends the glass blasting followed by 5 coats of epoxy (the 5 coats is their rule for European boats).  My yard has suggested 3 coats of epoxy as a water barrier.

I had been hoping for soda blasting plus a single coat of epoxy as a primer, on the assumption that the barrier coat under the gel coat would remain intact.  I did not expect that it would not be possible to find a soda blasting contractor in Rhode Island (or nearby Massachusetts) who works on boat hulls.

 

Any suggestions for me?  I feel stuck and am inclined to use glass blasting following by 3 or more coats of epoxy as a barrier coat.

 

Mark Pitt

“Sabbatical III”, SM#419, Wickford, Rhode Island, USA

 


 

eric freedman
 

Hi Pat,

Sorry I could not find the paint stripper I used.

West marine has some products but they seem expensive. You might need 10 gallons.

My local paint supply says there a number of products that will work . However, when you get close to the

gel coat you should not let it sit on the hull too long.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376

 

Hi Pat,

I do not remember the name. I will try to get the name for you tomorrow.

It took 2 yard workers 4 days to strip and sand.

It is best applied in a warm environment as it is a chemical reaction.

I did mine in July. They used cheap brushes and scrapers for the majority of the work and then putty knives when they got close to the gel coat. It takes multiple applications and waiting time for this stripper to work.

They then used a sander to complete the job. It wasn’t difficult just time consuming.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Patrick McAneny via Groups.Io
Sent: Wednesday, March 04, 2020 6:30 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Bottom paint removal problem

 

Eric, I need to remove 20 some years of paint. Do you remember the name of the product you bought from Home Depot ? Was it meant to be used on fiberglass? Have any idea as to the man hours to strip your boat. Thinking I may hire a helper or two and tackle it myself.

Thanks,

Pat

-----Original Message-----
From: eric freedman <kimberlite@...>
To: main <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>; Mark Pitt <mark_pitt@...>
Sent: Wed, Feb 26, 2020 12:06 pm
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Bottom paint removal problem

Hi Mark,
After 16 years I had the bottom of Kimberlite cleaned down to the gelcoat. I did not want to use any form of blasting. I had the yard use a chemical stripper available at Home depot to remove paint down to the gelcoat. It took time and multiple applications but it worked and the bottom came up quite clean. I think the paint we removed weighed somewhere between 3 and 400 pounds and it was ablative paint..
I then had the yard apply 4 coats of interprotect . They then applied a hard epoxy blue paint and then 2 coats of black ablative paint. worked great . We hauled this year after 2 years and the bottom was beautiful. I would suggest using the chemical stripper when it is warm as it is a chemical process.
Fair Winds,
Eric
SM 376 Kimberlite

On February 25, 2020 at 2:28 PM Mark Pitt <mark_pitt@...> wrote:

I have owned my Super Maramu since she was launched in 2003.  Amel applied a hard bottom paint before launch in 2003 but since then I have only used ablative paint.  The layer is now thick and a bit uneven.  Having carefully examined the words of caution on the Amel owners group, particularly those of Joel Potter, I have looked in vain for a soda blaster to remove all the old bottom paint. I just cannot find one in Rhode Island.  The contractor recommended by my Rhode Island marina uses glass and is apparently very experienced with blasting boat bottoms. 

Last week I contacted the large Hinckley repair yard in Portsmouth, RI and it turns out that they do not have access to soda blasting either and use the same glass blasting contractor used by the full service marina where Sabbatical III is stored.  Hinckley recommends the glass blasting followed by 5 coats of epoxy (the 5 coats is their rule for European boats).  My yard has suggested 3 coats of epoxy as a water barrier.

I had been hoping for soda blasting plus a single coat of epoxy as a primer, on the assumption that the barrier coat under the gel coat would remain intact.  I did not expect that it would not be possible to find a soda blasting contractor in Rhode Island (or nearby Massachusetts) who works on boat hulls.

 

Any suggestions for me?  I feel stuck and am inclined to use glass blasting following by 3 or more coats of epoxy as a barrier coat.

 

Mark Pitt

“Sabbatical III”, SM#419, Wickford, Rhode Island, USA

 


 

Miles
 

Hi Pat,

 

As I said in a previous note, I don’t remember what I used either, but I do remember looking it up in Practical Sailor.  I think it might be worth subscribing, if you don’t, just to look at their test results.  The different products varied a great deal in both cost and in quality and in toxicity.  

I hired a crew to do mine and I think that it took 3 applications and lots of scraping.  It was over 10 years accumulation.   I remember Practical Sailor talked about some products that were less toxic but took longer. 

As in many cases, there was no or little correlation between quality of product and price of product.

 

Regards,

 

Miles,  s/y Ladybug, Le Marin, Martinique