Topics

Companion way for removal

scentstone
 

Precise, extensive and poetic description of an intimidating operation ;-)
Thanks a lot Craig !
F. 

eric freedman
 

Dear Dieter,

I just use a UV  preventive hard wax. I get it at an automotive supply.

I believe a number of members use Polytrol on the decks. After reading Joel Potters comments, I thought I should also use it.

However when I went to their website they have 2 Polytrol s listed . One regular and one Marine.

I called them today and asked what was the difference.

They said it is the same stuff with different labels.

I guess so the chandleries can get more for it. It also costs the same.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376’

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of INUS - BUSCH via Groups.Io
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 7:32 AM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Companion way for removal

 

Hi Eric,

you mention the use of wax to block the UV on the Formica. 

I am curious what wax did you use and also if it can be used to prevent the gelcoat from bleaching?
All the best

Dieter

Fal-lera Sharki #135

 


Am 13.10.2019 um 04:10 schrieb eric freedman <kimberlite@...>:

Hi Miles,

I wanted to replace the veneer on Kimberlites companionway and replace it with laminate.

To get to the entire door off  you have to remove the hard dodger.—NO WAY--

I removed the stop and blocked the companionway door all the way up till it touched the dodger. I then made a rail the height of the side trim.

Using these rails and a router I was able to get to  the edges of the door. Of course the veneer that is under the trim cannot be replaced but it cannot be seen. I then routed the entire door and applied the laminate- I used Formica brand color teak. Seven years and it is still holding up. However it is important to use wax to block the UV on the Formica.

Pictures attached.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

INUS - BUSCH
 

Thanks Eric,
I was thinking of maybe someone invented a wax with particles in it to protect a surface from being destroyed by UV. Could be a big market. The mention of automobile supply is very helpful. 
Dieter
Fal-lera Sharki #135

Von meinem iPhone gesendet

Am 16.10.2019 um 06:44 schrieb eric freedman <kimberlite@...>:

Dear Dieter,

I just use a UV  preventive hard wax. I get it at an automotive supply.

I believe a number of members use Polytrol on the decks. After reading Joel Potters comments, I thought I should also use it.

However when I went to their website they have 2 Polytrol s listed . One regular and one Marine.

I called them today and asked what was the difference.

They said it is the same stuff with different labels.

I guess so the chandleries can get more for it. It also costs the same.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376’

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of INUS - BUSCH via Groups.Io
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 7:32 AM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Companion way for removal

 

Hi Eric,

you mention the use of wax to block the UV on the Formica. 

I am curious what wax did you use and also if it can be used to prevent the gelcoat from bleaching?
All the best

Dieter

Fal-lera Sharki #135

 


Am 13.10.2019 um 04:10 schrieb eric freedman <kimberlite@...>:

Hi Miles,

I wanted to replace the veneer on Kimberlites companionway and replace it with laminate.

To get to the entire door off  you have to remove the hard dodger.—NO WAY--

I removed the stop and blocked the companionway door all the way up till it touched the dodger. I then made a rail the height of the side trim.

Using these rails and a router I was able to get to  the edges of the door. Of course the veneer that is under the trim cannot be replaced but it cannot be seen. I then routed the entire door and applied the laminate- I used Formica brand color teak. Seven years and it is still holding up. However it is important to use wax to block the UV on the Formica.

Pictures attached.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

ianjenkins1946 <ianjudyjenkins@hotmail.com>
 

Hi Dieter,

 We apply beeswax  to the companionway door generously every time we lay the boat up. We also have a winter cover which stops sunlight falling directly on it.  After 19 years the laminate still holds but it won't last forever.

Ian and Judy, Pen Azen, SM 302, Laying up in Kilada, Greece


From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of INUS - BUSCH via Groups.Io <inusbusch@...>
Sent: 16 October 2019 07:40
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io <main@amelyachtowners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Companion way for removal
 
Thanks Eric,
I was thinking of maybe someone invented a wax with particles in it to protect a surface from being destroyed by UV. Could be a big market. The mention of automobile supply is very helpful. 
Dieter
Fal-lera Sharki #135

Von meinem iPhone gesendet

Am 16.10.2019 um 06:44 schrieb eric freedman <kimberlite@...>:

Dear Dieter,

I just use a UV  preventive hard wax. I get it at an automotive supply.

I believe a number of members use Polytrol on the decks. After reading Joel Potters comments, I thought I should also use it.

However when I went to their website they have 2 Polytrol s listed . One regular and one Marine.

I called them today and asked what was the difference.

They said it is the same stuff with different labels.

I guess so the chandleries can get more for it. It also costs the same.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376’

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of INUS - BUSCH via Groups.Io
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 7:32 AM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Companion way for removal

 

Hi Eric,

you mention the use of wax to block the UV on the Formica. 

I am curious what wax did you use and also if it can be used to prevent the gelcoat from bleaching?
All the best

Dieter

Fal-lera Sharki #135

 


Am 13.10.2019 um 04:10 schrieb eric freedman <kimberlite@...>:

Hi Miles,

I wanted to replace the veneer on Kimberlites companionway and replace it with laminate.

To get to the entire door off  you have to remove the hard dodger.—NO WAY--

I removed the stop and blocked the companionway door all the way up till it touched the dodger. I then made a rail the height of the side trim.

Using these rails and a router I was able to get to  the edges of the door. Of course the veneer that is under the trim cannot be replaced but it cannot be seen. I then routed the entire door and applied the laminate- I used Formica brand color teak. Seven years and it is still holding up. However it is important to use wax to block the UV on the Formica.

Pictures attached.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

Courtney Gorman
 

Just a thought as I have no experience in removing the dodger but if you could thread braided fishing line between the dodger and the deck then you could tie 'Handles' to both ends and 'saw' through the caulk with NO risk of damage.  
Cheers
Courtney
Trippin
54 #101


-----Original Message-----
From: Craig Briggs SN 68 Sangaris via Groups.Io <sangaris@...>
To: main <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Sent: Tue, Oct 15, 2019 9:26 pm
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Companion way for removal

[Edited Message Follows]
Our dodger was, indeed, well bedded to the deck. I'm sure everyone's is - it's the "AMEL Way".  What I did was to VERY carefully, using a fish filleting knife, insert it under the dodger to cut the caulk. That is a CAPITAL LETTERS VERY CAREFULLY! You may come up a better tool but it must be very sharp, very thin and very strong.

First though, I rigged a line to a halyard with some snatch blocks to the mizzen to make it lift straight up from the dodger, then led it through the windshield opening window and applied a LOT of lifting force.  Then I went to the filet knife and started cutting. After a while I saw some movement and then used some chisels as wedges to break the seal more and it finally worked. I had three tiny nicks (about 1/8th inch roundish)  in the deck gelcoat at some places in the base of the dodger where I was not careful enough with the chisel.  I patched them and they are not visible now. This took about 3 hours to do. You should take 4 hours and not nick the gelcoat at all.

Once the dodger popped free it is easy-peasy. There is wire through the deck in the middle of the dodger going to the overhead light but it has enough slack (about 6 inches) so you can easily tilt and swing the dodger to allow the companionway hatch to slide up and out. Re-bedding was very easy. I just used silicone so if I need to take it off again it will be easy, but you can take your pick of bedding compounds.

If I recall correctly, I did this about 2004 and the Plexiglas (Perspex in Europe?) is still in excellent condition. It does have a couple of barely noticeable vertical scratches where I must have been careless with not cleaning off some boatyard grit, but, it's hardly noticeable and hey, we're talking 15 years!. 

The one thing that isn't perfect is that I chose a plexiglass with a very light grey tint that seemed like a good idea at the time.  That's great, as during the day it looks like a black mirror from the outside, giving complete privacy below - at night with lights on below you can see right through, hence the hanging privacy shade. During the day, though, if the hatch is closed and exposed to direct sunlight it heats up and expands such that it binds in the track and is hard to open or close. Just a small annoyance, but if I did it again I might choose totally clear plexiglass and maybe a fraction thinner. Or, and it's one of those "one-of-these-years" things, I might just sand the wood slots a bit wider but, obviously, it's not a big deal. We've got a great "T-Top" over the cockpit so sun on the plexiglass is rare. 

Katherine and I think it is one of the best modifications we made to the boat and we did not do it until we had lived aboard for 5 years, so we did think it out thoroughly. Then, after we did it we hired a psychic who put us in touch with "The Captain" - the psychic said that he was smiling! That's our story and we're stickin' to it!

Cheers, Craig

 

Courtney,

Good idea. 

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Amel Yacht Owners School - www.AmelYachtOwnersSchool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970


On Wed, Oct 16, 2019, 2:26 PM Courtney Gorman via Groups.Io <Itsfun1=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Just a thought as I have no experience in removing the dodger but if you could thread braided fishing line between the dodger and the deck then you could tie 'Handles' to both ends and 'saw' through the caulk with NO risk of damage.  
Cheers
Courtney
Trippin
54 #101


-----Original Message-----
From: Craig Briggs SN 68 Sangaris via Groups.Io <sangaris=aol.com@groups.io>
To: main <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Sent: Tue, Oct 15, 2019 9:26 pm
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Companion way for removal

[Edited Message Follows]
Our dodger was, indeed, well bedded to the deck. I'm sure everyone's is - it's the "AMEL Way".  What I did was to VERY carefully, using a fish filleting knife, insert it under the dodger to cut the caulk. That is a CAPITAL LETTERS VERY CAREFULLY! You may come up a better tool but it must be very sharp, very thin and very strong.

First though, I rigged a line to a halyard with some snatch blocks to the mizzen to make it lift straight up from the dodger, then led it through the windshield opening window and applied a LOT of lifting force.  Then I went to the filet knife and started cutting. After a while I saw some movement and then used some chisels as wedges to break the seal more and it finally worked. I had three tiny nicks (about 1/8th inch roundish)  in the deck gelcoat at some places in the base of the dodger where I was not careful enough with the chisel.  I patched them and they are not visible now. This took about 3 hours to do. You should take 4 hours and not nick the gelcoat at all.

Once the dodger popped free it is easy-peasy. There is wire through the deck in the middle of the dodger going to the overhead light but it has enough slack (about 6 inches) so you can easily tilt and swing the dodger to allow the companionway hatch to slide up and out. Re-bedding was very easy. I just used silicone so if I need to take it off again it will be easy, but you can take your pick of bedding compounds.

If I recall correctly, I did this about 2004 and the Plexiglas (Perspex in Europe?) is still in excellent condition. It does have a couple of barely noticeable vertical scratches where I must have been careless with not cleaning off some boatyard grit, but, it's hardly noticeable and hey, we're talking 15 years!. 

The one thing that isn't perfect is that I chose a plexiglass with a very light grey tint that seemed like a good idea at the time.  That's great, as during the day it looks like a black mirror from the outside, giving complete privacy below - at night with lights on below you can see right through, hence the hanging privacy shade. During the day, though, if the hatch is closed and exposed to direct sunlight it heats up and expands such that it binds in the track and is hard to open or close. Just a small annoyance, but if I did it again I might choose totally clear plexiglass and maybe a fraction thinner. Or, and it's one of those "one-of-these-years" things, I might just sand the wood slots a bit wider but, obviously, it's not a big deal. We've got a great "T-Top" over the cockpit so sun on the plexiglass is rare. 

Katherine and I think it is one of the best modifications we made to the boat and we did not do it until we had lived aboard for 5 years, so we did think it out thoroughly. Then, after we did it we hired a psychic who put us in touch with "The Captain" - the psychic said that he was smiling! That's our story and we're stickin' to it!

Cheers, Craig

eric freedman
 

Joel suggested that years ago,

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of CW Bill Rouse
Sent: Wednesday, October 16, 2019 5:56 PM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Companion way for removal

 

Courtney,

 

Good idea. 

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Amel Yacht Owners School - www.AmelYachtOwnersSchool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970

 

On Wed, Oct 16, 2019, 2:26 PM Courtney Gorman via Groups.Io <Itsfun1=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

Just a thought as I have no experience in removing the dodger but if you could thread braided fishing line between the dodger and the deck then you could tie 'Handles' to both ends and 'saw' through the caulk with NO risk of damage.  

Cheers

Courtney

Trippin

54 #101

-----Original Message-----
From: Craig Briggs SN 68 Sangaris via Groups.Io <sangaris=aol.com@groups.io>
To: main <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Sent: Tue, Oct 15, 2019 9:26 pm
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Companion way for removal

[Edited Message Follows]

Our dodger was, indeed, well bedded to the deck. I'm sure everyone's is - it's the "AMEL Way".  What I did was to VERY carefully, using a fish filleting knife, insert it under the dodger to cut the caulk. That is a CAPITAL LETTERS VERY CAREFULLY! You may come up a better tool but it must be very sharp, very thin and very strong.

First though, I rigged a line to a halyard with some snatch blocks to the mizzen to make it lift straight up from the dodger, then led it through the windshield opening window and applied a LOT of lifting force.  Then I went to the filet knife and started cutting. After a while I saw some movement and then used some chisels as wedges to break the seal more and it finally worked. I had three tiny nicks (about 1/8th inch roundish)  in the deck gelcoat at some places in the base of the dodger where I was not careful enough with the chisel.  I patched them and they are not visible now. This took about 3 hours to do. You should take 4 hours and not nick the gelcoat at all.

Once the dodger popped free it is easy-peasy. There is wire through the deck in the middle of the dodger going to the overhead light but it has enough slack (about 6 inches) so you can easily tilt and swing the dodger to allow the companionway hatch to slide up and out. Re-bedding was very easy. I just used silicone so if I need to take it off again it will be easy, but you can take your pick of bedding compounds.

If I recall correctly, I did this about 2004 and the Plexiglas (Perspex in Europe?) is still in excellent condition. It does have a couple of barely noticeable vertical scratches where I must have been careless with not cleaning off some boatyard grit, but, it's hardly noticeable and hey, we're talking 15 years!. 

The one thing that isn't perfect is that I chose a plexiglass with a very light grey tint that seemed like a good idea at the time.  That's great, as during the day it looks like a black mirror from the outside, giving complete privacy below - at night with lights on below you can see right through, hence the hanging privacy shade. During the day, though, if the hatch is closed and exposed to direct sunlight it heats up and expands such that it binds in the track and is hard to open or close. Just a small annoyance, but if I did it again I might choose totally clear plexiglass and maybe a fraction thinner. Or, and it's one of those "one-of-these-years" things, I might just sand the wood slots a bit wider but, obviously, it's not a big deal. We've got a great "T-Top" over the cockpit so sun on the plexiglass is rare. 

Katherine and I think it is one of the best modifications we made to the boat and we did not do it until we had lived aboard for 5 years, so we did think it out thoroughly. Then, after we did it we hired a psychic who put us in touch with "The Captain" - the psychic said that he was smiling! That's our story and we're stickin' to it!

Cheers, Craig

INUS - BUSCH
 

Ian and Judy,
beewax seems to fit good for natural wood, thanks for that.
All the best.
Dieter
Fal-lera Sharki #135

Von meinem iPhone gesendet

Am 16.10.2019 um 19:01 schrieb ianjenkins1946 <ianjudyjenkins@...> <ianjudyjenkins@...>:

Ian and Judy

Duane Siegfri
 

We are also looking at ways to renew the companionway, and the plexiglass idea is one we like.

I am no expert, but I have read that glued joints in plexiglass are nearly invisible.  My thought was to remove the existing companionway by cutting horizontally, reuse the top rail, lock and hardware, and make the rest from plexiglass matching the thickness.  Have the fabrication shop put a half-lap scarf joint (as low as possible) to field glue in place so that one does not have to remove dodger.

I had to look up the "half-lap scarf joint" terminology (google it, since I can't draw the shape here) so forgive me if that's not accurate.  This is a joint that looks like a step on each piece, they fit together and give a lot more area for the glue to adhere.  

I am considering sanding the exterior surface with 1000 grit sandpaper to make it opaque, and to render further scratching from the bottom rubber seal not an issue.

Any thoughts from plexiglass experts out there?

Duane
Wanderer, SM#477

Craig & Katherine Briggs SN 68 Sangaris Tropic Isle Harbor, FL
 

Duane,
There is frosted plexiglass available that could be a good choice for you rather than sanding. Good idea for minimizing scratching from the wiper, if you choose to use it - I just took the wiper out.
I had a millwork make a new top rail, but you could reuse the old - you may need a router to clean out the door groove. We used a double thickness of plexi across the top few inches to mount the lock, top rail and locking bolts.
Cheers, Craig

Duane Siegfri
 

Alan,

I came by this morning to have a look at your companionway, and it looks great.  Could you give some more information on your proceedure?

Did you remove the door, or just raise it to the Dodger?

If the door wasn't removed, were you able to mask off the wood channel the door slides in, or how did you protect the unpained frame?  Or did you just paint to the edge of the frame?

What kind of epoxy filler did you use?  Just one coat?  Was it applied by brush?

Thanks!
Duane
Wanderer, SM#477


Alan Grayson
 

Hey mate, I did not remove the slide, I just removed the plywood at the back to allow it to slide up to the dodger. I masked off the wood on either side before raising the slide to work on it.
I removed all the top layer of the plywood then sanded with 80 grit. One coat of high build epoxy primer then a sand with 220 grit. I was not happy with the coverage so I did it again, then 2 coats of awlgrip Nordic white straight off the shelf. It was close enough for the 3 meter rule. If it looks good from 3 meters then your done. I do have a couple of runs so I would like to do another coat but I’m in no rush.
All done with a brush and foam brush.
We are heading to St Anne for a few days of R&R and zero dollar days after 2 very hectic days.
Rigging went well I had it very close they only adjusted the main uppers,the mizzen uppers and the mizzen backstays.
Got everything on my list ticked off.
Alan


From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of Duane Siegfri via Groups.Io <carlylelk@...>
Sent: Tuesday, December 3, 2019 3:01:37 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Companion way for removal
 
Alan,

I came by this morning to have a look at your companionway, and it looks great.  Could you give some more information on your proceedure?

Did you remove the door, or just raise it to the Dodger?

If the door wasn't removed, were you able to mask off the wood channel the door slides in, or how did you protect the unpained frame?  Or did you just paint to the edge of the frame?

What kind of epoxy filler did you use?  Just one coat?  Was it applied by brush?

Thanks!
Duane
Wanderer, SM#477


Courtney Gorman
 

Alan we will be anchored in St Anne tonight 
Cheers 
Courtney 
Trippin 


On Dec 3, 2019, at 6:26 PM, Alan Grayson <bazgrayson@...> wrote:


Hey mate, I did not remove the slide, I just removed the plywood at the back to allow it to slide up to the dodger. I masked off the wood on either side before raising the slide to work on it.
I removed all the top layer of the plywood then sanded with 80 grit. One coat of high build epoxy primer then a sand with 220 grit. I was not happy with the coverage so I did it again, then 2 coats of awlgrip Nordic white straight off the shelf. It was close enough for the 3 meter rule. If it looks good from 3 meters then your done. I do have a couple of runs so I would like to do another coat but I’m in no rush.
All done with a brush and foam brush.
We are heading to St Anne for a few days of R&R and zero dollar days after 2 very hectic days.
Rigging went well I had it very close they only adjusted the main uppers,the mizzen uppers and the mizzen backstays.
Got everything on my list ticked off.
Alan


From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of Duane Siegfri via Groups.Io <carlylelk@...>
Sent: Tuesday, December 3, 2019 3:01:37 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Companion way for removal
 
Alan,

I came by this morning to have a look at your companionway, and it looks great.  Could you give some more information on your proceedure?

Did you remove the door, or just raise it to the Dodger?

If the door wasn't removed, were you able to mask off the wood channel the door slides in, or how did you protect the unpained frame?  Or did you just paint to the edge of the frame?

What kind of epoxy filler did you use?  Just one coat?  Was it applied by brush?

Thanks!
Duane
Wanderer, SM#477