D3-110 timing belt replacement the easy way?


Dean Gillies
 

Hi Brainstrust,

The Volvo workshop manual details the process for changing the timing belt, requiring a bunch of specialised tooling. Mark Mueller from SV Brass Ring posted a fabulous summary of how to do this in-practice on an Amel. 
To quote Mark, he said "This project has a higher than normal degree of difficulty based on the number of steps, the high
torque value of the crankshaft nut, the ability to align the timing marks due to the limited space, & if you screw up you could permanently damage the engine".

I'm currently contemplating a way to change the belt (along with the tensioner and idler pulleys) without having to remove the crankshaft pulley. If this is possible then the change can be done without the need for special tooling, and I believe the degree of difficulty reduces significantly.

The pictures attached show that the only thing stopping the belt from being removed is the small post on the casting behind the crankshaft pulley. There is sufficient clearance for the belt to pass between the top of the post and the back of the pulley, but the shape of the pulley makes it very difficult to wiggle the old belt out of there.

I believe that a new belt will go in there without too much trouble, but I cannot put it all the way in until the old belt is removed, so cannot prove to myself that this will work. I could easily cut the old belt to remove it, but then if I cannot insert the new belt, I am stuck with no belt and no special tooling to remove the crankshaft pulley to install the new belt using the "high degree of difficulty method".  

Has anyone else used this method to replace the timing belt?  If so, is there something I am missing in removing the old belt without cutting it?

--
Dean Gillies
SV Stella *****,  Amel 54-154


Dean Gillies
 
Edited

After a coffee, some late breakfast and a bit more thinking time, I managed to get the old belt off without cutting it.  I pushed a plastic card (credit card size) between the teeth of the belt and the rear of the crankshaft pulley and this stopped the teeth from jamming on the rear of the pulley.  

The new belt then slipped in without any problems, and the engine is now up and running again.

Bottom line:  There IS an "easy way" to change the timing belt. In future I would simply cut the old belt making this a very easy job.

--
Dean Gillies
SV Stella *****,  Amel 54-154


Roque
 

Great! Thanks for sharing 

Roque 

Em dom., 12 de jun. de 2022 às 08:33, Dean Gillies <stella@...> escreveu:

[Edited Message Follows]

After a coffee, some late breakfast and a bit more thinking time, I managed to get the old belt off without cutting it.  I pushed a plastic card (credit card size) between the teeth of the belt and the rear of the crankshaft pulley and this stopped the teeth from jamming on the rear of the pulley.  

The new belt then slipped in without any problems, and the engine is now up and running again.

Bottom line:  There IS an "easy way" to change the timing belt. In future I would simply cut the old belt making this a very easy job.

--
Dean Gillies
SV Stella *****,  Amel 54-154


--
Roque
Attika A54 117
Paraty - Brazil 


Bill Kinney
 

Excellent job!

Changing  timing belts on schedule is critical to avoiding catastrophic engine failure if one breaks in use.  Anything to make it easier is really helpful.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie 
Le Marin, Martinique 


Dominique Sery
 

Hello Dean,
This is very interesting.  I asked myself the question several times but I did not do it because I had to buy specialized tools probably sold at a very high price to the individual.  Your method avoids special tools.  In 2017 when I bought the boat, it was the first thing I had the Volvo marine agent do.  The bill was very high (1242 €).  But Volvo recommends changing the circulating water pump at the same time (it is, by the way, supplied in the timing belt kit).  Is it really necessary to change the water pump every time?  if it is not essential your solution seems great to me.
Best regards
Dominique
Irko A54#16


Bruno COTTE
 

Water pump life is more than 10 years . It is better to change it after this period in order to avoid an impossible sucking when using the engine … 

Envoyé de mon iPhone

Le 12 juin 2022 à 14:21, Dominique Sery via groups.io <dominiquesery@...> a écrit :

Hello Dean,
This is very interesting.  I asked myself the question several times but I did not do it because I had to buy specialized tools probably sold at a very high price to the individual.  Your method avoids special tools.  In 2017 when I bought the boat, it was the first thing I had the Volvo marine agent do.  The bill was very high (1242 €).  But Volvo recommends changing the circulating water pump at the same time (it is, by the way, supplied in the timing belt kit).  Is it really necessary to change the water pump every time?  if it is not essential your solution seems great to me.
Best regards
Dominique
Irko A54#16


Dean Gillies
 

Hi Dominique,
Do you mean the "coolant pump" (as Volvo call it) which is driven by the timing belt, or do you mean the raw water pump which is driven by the auxiliary (alternator) belt?

I changed the raw water pump last year so did not change with this belt change (1400hrs), only the belt and two pulleys came with the kit I bought.

I have an excellent diesel mechanic at home in Sydney whom I fully trust, however when cruising I always prefer to do my own servicing wherever possible.

--
Dean Gillies
SV Stella *****,  Amel 54-154


Dean Gillies
 

I need to credit Denis Elborn from Amel 54 SV Fortune. This was his idea.
Thanks Denis!

--
Dean Gillies
SV Stella *****,  Amel 54-154


Ron Hynes
 

Just curious, at how many engine hours does Volvo recommend that you change the timing belt? Way back in the 1960s, I work for a company (Gilmer, then US Rubber Co then Uniroyal) that originated the concept of timing belts in lieu of chain drives to rotate the camshaft.  Fiat and General Motors (Chevrolet) did extensive testing before using these on production vehicles and both found that the belts then lasted a minimum of 10,000 hours. I am sure over the years this life has been extended with better materials, etc. Obviously, a timing belt failure is catastrophic since the intake and exhaust valves will collide with the piston once the camshaft is out of sync. Very costly indeed. I note that fewer new engines use timing belts, not because of early failures, but rather the cost of routine replacement.

Ron Hynes
954.319.0944

On Jun 12, 2022, at 9:21 AM, Dean Gillies <stella@...> wrote:

I need to credit Denis Elborn from Amel 54 SV Fortune. This was his idea.
Thanks Denis!

--
Dean Gillies
SV Stella *****,  Amel 54-154


Dean Gillies
 

The recommended change interval for the D3-110 is 1400 hours.

I have 1407 hours and the old belt looked absolutely perfect, I'm sure it would have lasted a lot longer.  I also changed the idler and tensioner. The idler was showing signs of leakage, the tensioner looked perfect.

--
Dean Gillies
SV Stella *****,  Amel 54-154


WASABI - Rudolf Waldispuehl
 

Hi Dean

 

Excellent job. Well done. !

I changed my timing belt last year in Almerimar with some private help of an German Car-Mechanic guy. He had the right tools.;-)

 

According to the original VP Service Plan (Schedule) the timing belt should be replaced after 1400h. There is no information to change to coolant pump driven by the timing belt.

 

When I changed the timing belt I was unsecure and asked an excellent Yacht Diesel Engine Engineer back home. He said, he never changed the coolant pump on a VP when he changes the timing belts. He stated that some manufacturer are just making money by asking regular changes and I guess also the 1400h for the timing belt has a lot of room for double/triple or more hours. But by keeping the engine under some warranty, we are forced to follow the Service schedules.

 

Thanks to show how to do the Time-Belt change without the special tools. GREAT!

 

Best regards

Ruedi W,

SY WASABI - A54-#55

Currently in KALAMOS

 

 

 

Von: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io" <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> im Auftrag von Ron Hynes <riffhynes@...>
Antworten an: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io" <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Datum: Sonntag, 12. Juni 2022 um 15:58
An: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io" <main@amelyachtowners.groups.io>
Betreff: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] D3-110 timing belt replacement the easy way?

 

Just curious, at how many engine hours does Volvo recommend that you change the timing belt? Way back in the 1960s, I work for a company (Gilmer, then US Rubber Co then Uniroyal) that originated the concept of timing belts in lieu of chain drives to rotate the camshaft.  Fiat and General Motors (Chevrolet) did extensive testing before using these on production vehicles and both found that the belts then lasted a minimum of 10,000 hours. I am sure over the years this life has been extended with better materials, etc. Obviously, a timing belt failure is catastrophic since the intake and exhaust valves will collide with the piston once the camshaft is out of sync. Very costly indeed. I note that fewer new engines use timing belts, not because of early failures, but rather the cost of routine replacement.

Ron Hynes

954.319.0944



On Jun 12, 2022, at 9:21 AM, Dean Gillies <stella@...> wrote:

I need to credit Denis Elborn from Amel 54 SV Fortune. This was his idea.
Thanks Denis!

--
Dean Gillies
SV Stella *****,  Amel 54-154


WASABI - Rudolf Waldispuehl
 

The Idle and the Tensioner comes together in a Volvo Time-Belt service kit and should be replaced with the time belt.

Ruedi Waldispuehl

 

SY WASABI

AMEL54 #55

 

Von: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io" <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> im Auftrag von Dean Gillies <stella@...>
Antworten an: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io" <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Datum: Sonntag, 12. Juni 2022 um 17:06
An: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io" <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Betreff: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] D3-110 timing belt replacement the easy way?

 

The recommended change interval for the D3-110 is 1400 hours.

I have 1407 hours and the old belt looked absolutely perfect, I'm sure it would have lasted a lot longer.  I also changed the idler and tensioner. The idler was showing signs of leakage, the tensioner looked perfect.

--
Dean Gillies
SV Stella *****,  Amel 54-154


Germain Jean-Pierre
 

As a side note… car manufacturers state a belt change is needed between 90000 to 120000 kms depending on the manufacturer.

Given the average speed of a car is about 30 km/h, this is 3000 engine hours!  

Are we being gouged?

Jean-Pierre Germain, formerly Eleuthera, SM007


On 12 Jun 2022, at 11:49, WASABI - Rudolf Waldispuehl <Rudolf@...> wrote:



Hi Dean

 

Excellent job. Well done. !

I changed my timing belt last year in Almerimar with some private help of an German Car-Mechanic guy. He had the right tools.;-)

 

According to the original VP Service Plan (Schedule) the timing belt should be replaced after 1400h. There is no information to change to coolant pump driven by the timing belt.

 

When I changed the timing belt I was unsecure and asked an excellent Yacht Diesel Engine Engineer back home. He said, he never changed the coolant pump on a VP when he changes the timing belts. He stated that some manufacturer are just making money by asking regular changes and I guess also the 1400h for the timing belt has a lot of room for double/triple or more hours. But by keeping the engine under some warranty, we are forced to follow the Service schedules.

 

Thanks to show how to do the Time-Belt change without the special tools. GREAT!

 

Best regards

Ruedi W,

SY WASABI - A54-#55

Currently in KALAMOS

 

 

 

Von: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io" <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> im Auftrag von Ron Hynes <riffhynes@...>
Antworten an: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io" <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Datum: Sonntag, 12. Juni 2022 um 15:58
An: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io" <main@amelyachtowners.groups.io>
Betreff: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] D3-110 timing belt replacement the easy way?

 

Just curious, at how many engine hours does Volvo recommend that you change the timing belt? Way back in the 1960s, I work for a company (Gilmer, then US Rubber Co then Uniroyal) that originated the concept of timing belts in lieu of chain drives to rotate the camshaft.  Fiat and General Motors (Chevrolet) did extensive testing before using these on production vehicles and both found that the belts then lasted a minimum of 10,000 hours. I am sure over the years this life has been extended with better materials, etc. Obviously, a timing belt failure is catastrophic since the intake and exhaust valves will collide with the piston once the camshaft is out of sync. Very costly indeed. I note that fewer new engines use timing belts, not because of early failures, but rather the cost of routine replacement.

Ron Hynes

954.319.0944



On Jun 12, 2022, at 9:21 AM, Dean Gillies <stella@...> wrote:

I need to credit Denis Elborn from Amel 54 SV Fortune. This was his idea.
Thanks Denis!

--
Dean Gillies
SV Stella *****,  Amel 54-154


Mark & Debbie Mueller
 

Congratulations!!  I was unable to get the belt past that little nub on the engine, Hopefully it will work for everyone.
--
Mark Mueller
former Brass Ring  A54


Dominique Sery
 

 
Hello Dean,
it was the coolant pump Volvo 8694630.
Dominique







 


 











Dominique,
Do you mean the "coolant pump" (as Volvo call it) which is driven by the timing belt, or do you mean the raw water pump which is driven by the auxiliary (alternator) belt?

I changed the raw water pump last year so did not change with this belt change (1400hrs), only the belt and two pulleys came with the kit I bought.

I have an excellent diesel mechanic at home in Sydney whom I fully trust, however when cruising I always prefer to do my own servicing wherever possible.

-- 
Dean Gillies
SV Stella *****,  Amel 54-154