Dehumidifier Drain Outlet


Dean Gillies
 

I have always run a dehumidifier on my boats for all the usual reasons.
Since I bought Stella, I have always wintered her out of the water. I've removed the depth-sounder transducer and drained the dehumidifier to the outside. Easy.

This year, she is wintering in the water. This presents an interesting dilemna regarding where to drain the dehumidifier.

I could send it down the sink where it ends up in the bilge as standing water waiting for the bilge pump to trigger and hopefully evacuate most of it.  I don't like leaving water in the engine room when the boat is not being used and a failure of the bilge pump could end up with a few hundred litres of water in the engine room. Not ideal! I could hook up my bilge alarm to my Victron Cerbo system which could then send me an email allowing me to contact the marina staff to intervene.

I could easily send it into the freshwater tank where a few hundred litres over the winter would not make that much of a dent.  That would mean leaving empty space in the freshwater tank, which I usually avoid when wintering to minimise the potential for bacteria to develop in the tank space.

Any other clever ideas out there? (other than don't run a dehumidifier!) 

Cheers
Dean
SV STELLA
A54-154




Vladan SV PAME
 

Hi Dean,

I bought this dehumidifier and waiting to be delivered. https://ecor-pro.com/product/dh1200-dryfan-12-litre-stainless-steel-desiccant-dehumidifier/

No need for drain outlet but need exhaust outlet (vent). I'm planning to install unit in cockpit locker and to make exhaust under mizzen mast, just above fresh air intake for Webasto.
I think but not sure until I try, as temporary installation kitchen exhaust hose can be used.

Best Regards,
--
Vladan

A54 #157
SV PAME


Dean Gillies
 

Vladan,
Nice. I'm keen to hear how that one works out.

I already have a reliable unit onboard, but it does need to drain the water.
It's also great for using in the forward shower area when the clothes dryer is in use as it creates a lot of moisture, which is removed almost immediately by the dehumidifier.

Cheers
Dean
SV STELLA
A54-154
 


Scott SV Tengah
 

Dean,

I've run a 12L/day dehumidifier both times we have left the boat and I let it drain into the sink. You are right that it's a risk if the bilge pump or switch fails when you're away but we mitigated that by having a boat watcher check the engine room once a week. Your remote monitoring solution works, too.

Your hypothetical fear became my reality when my 12 year old bilge pump switch died without warning. Sure, I probably should have replaced it prior due to age, but it's not exactly an off the shelf product. This caused some relatively serious problems on a long upwind port tack passage, so I think it's best to install two pumps. My secondary alarm, mounted in the Amel standard position next to the AC pump, did not sound because it was elevated due to being on port tack.

Luckily I was aboard, so the damage was limited. Just as important, I think you should have two switches mounted in the gray water bilge. This is what I'm going to do.

As an aside, I don't plug in, but rather set the inverters (through the BMV-712 programmable relay and the inverter's remote on/off input) to run my dehumidifier between 60-100% SOC. This keeps the batteries happy.


--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Dean Gillies
 

Hi Scott,
My dehumidifier is specified at about 12L per day too, but it never produces that much water unless we are creating some major humidity with the clothes dryer. In reality it produces about 2 litres per day while we are living on board, and no doubt less when the boat is unoccupied. Regardless, it still needs the bilge pump to operate.

That's unfortunate about your bilge pump switch, and I can see how being on the port tack would delay the alarm sensor. Not sure I want two bilge pumps, but maybe a second alarm sensor on the STBD side of the bilge would be warranted.
I replaced my switch this year (11 years old) because the terminals were a bit corroded and one of them broke when I was disconnecting it for cleaning.  The switch was easy to source and it wasn't too difficult to fabricate an extender on the toggle. It has worked reliably since July, but past performance is no indication of future performance as you know !!

That's a nice way way to keep your LFP's happy.  Thankfully I don't have that problem with my hybrid battery system. I've set my LFP's to 65% SOC and switched them off completely. The 24V system is now floating at 27.4V on my AGM's. only. My LFP's are happy and my AGM's are happy.

The debate in my mind is now about whether to turn on my MPPT over winter as a backup in the event that my MP-3000 fails.

Cheers
Dean
SV STELLA
A54-154


 


Nick Newington
 

Dean,
What about T-ing into the forward holding tank or the riser from the thru-hull?
The dehumidifier could gravity feed into it. It would involve some plumbing and  it’s own valve.
There could be a smell issue, that could be overcome with a trap…
Just an idea to float.
You would gain certainty regarding draining the condensate but lose some Amel integrity…
Nick
Amelia all put to bed ashore in Leros, and leaving tonight..
AML54-019




On 9 Nov 2021, at 20:01, Dean Gillies <stella@...> wrote:

Hi Scott,
My dehumidifier is specified at about 12L per day too, but it never produces that much water unless we are creating some major humidity with the clothes dryer. In reality it produces about 2 litres per day while we are living on board, and no doubt less when the boat is unoccupied. Regardless, it still needs the bilge pump to operate.

That's unfortunate about your bilge pump switch, and I can see how being on the port tack would delay the alarm sensor. Not sure I want two bilge pumps, but maybe a second alarm sensor on the STBD side of the bilge would be warranted.
I replaced my switch this year (11 years old) because the terminals were a bit corroded and one of them broke when I was disconnecting it for cleaning.  The switch was easy to source and it wasn't too difficult to fabricate an extender on the toggle. It has worked reliably since July, but past performance is no indication of future performance as you know !!

That's a nice way way to keep your LFP's happy.  Thankfully I don't have that problem with my hybrid battery system. I've set my LFP's to 65% SOC and switched them off completely. The 24V system is now floating at 27.4V on my AGM's. only. My LFP's are happy and my AGM's are happy.

The debate in my mind is now about whether to turn on my MPPT over winter as a backup in the event that my MP-3000 fails.

Cheers
Dean
SV STELLA
A54-154


 


Dean Gillies
 

Hi Nick,
Safe travels home.

The holding tanks are a bit too high to be useful and I'm not too keen on T-ing into the toilet thru hulls/risers, although as you say it would work with a gravity feed.  I started investigating and checking my bilge alarm sensor and discovered that the alarm buzzer is not working and while I was mucking around the red light gave up the ghost too.  Now looking for replacements for those.

My main way forward at the moment is to hook up the bilge high-water alarm sensor to my CerboGX system which is on-line all the time. This allows me to know if a highwater alarm occurs (if my bilge pump fails) and then get something done about it.  Given its just a dehumidifier filling the bilge, nothing happens too quickly that I cant respond and get someone on board. That's the theory at least!

Cheers
Dean

SV Stella
A54-154
 


Paul Stascavage
 

Dean,

The previous owners of Rita Kathryn did the same thing as Jose describes in this thread https://amelyachtowners.groups.io/g/main/message/61037 when leaving the boar in warm locations except they used plywood to create a frame for the A/C unit to reside in the companionway door opening.

I was thinking you could fabricate a new companionway door from plywood (or your material of choice), hardware to lock it, and drill a hole for your dehumidifier drain line.  You could then place your dehumidifier on the top step of the companionway.  This would allow the unit to drain to the scuppers.  Provided your dehumidifier doesn't draw from the front and exit from the rear (or vice versa), it should sit nicely on that top step and do it's job just fine.  Our unit draws from the rear and exits from the top and others I have seen draw from the rear and exit from the side.

I hope this provides you with an additional alternative.

All the best,

Paul Stascavage
SM #466 - s/v Rita Kathryn
Currently exploring Brunswick, GA

www.RitaKathryn.com 


Chuck_Kim_Joy
 

Dear All,
We left our boat in the water in Le Marin, Martinique for 20 months. When we returned she was as fresh and dry as the day we left her. No mold, no leaks. The trick is not to leave anything on board with your body oil on it. Your last tee shirt you wore before changing to get on the plane. Bedding, towels, pillows. Make sure everything is clean prior. Don't bother with vacuum sealing either. One speck of moisture in that bag will spot everything. 
Other than that we are pleased with our boat. I would not do anything special for a month. 2 years maybe. 

All the best,
Chuck and Kim 
Joy 388
Antigua 

On Mon, Nov 15, 2021 at 9:59 AM Paul Stascavage via groups.io <pstas2003=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Dean,

The previous owners of Rita Kathryn did the same thing as Jose describes in this thread https://amelyachtowners.groups.io/g/main/message/61037 when leaving the boar in warm locations except they used plywood to create a frame for the A/C unit to reside in the companionway door opening.

I was thinking you could fabricate a new companionway door from plywood (or your material of choice), hardware to lock it, and drill a hole for your dehumidifier drain line.  You could then place your dehumidifier on the top step of the companionway.  This would allow the unit to drain to the scuppers.  Provided your dehumidifier doesn't draw from the front and exit from the rear (or vice versa), it should sit nicely on that top step and do it's job just fine.  Our unit draws from the rear and exits from the top and others I have seen draw from the rear and exit from the side.

I hope this provides you with an additional alternative.

All the best,

Paul Stascavage
SM #466 - s/v Rita Kathryn
Currently exploring Brunswick, GA

www.RitaKathryn.com 


Dean Gillies
 

Hi folks,
Thanks for all the recommendations, suggestions and imaginative ideas.
To close out the initial question, my solution was to drain the dehumidifier down the galley sink.

I cleaned out the bilge completely and hooked up the bilge alarm switch to my Victron Cerbo system which I monitor via the internet. I can see the dehumidifier running cycle based on the modulation of the AC supply and I can see when the bilge pump operates.  If there is a bilge alarm then an email will be sent to me within minutes. 

I would have preferred to dump overboard, but this was extraordinarily awkward to accomplish without making boat modifications that I didn't like.  So I am comfortable with this solution.
Thanks again to all.
Dean
SV STELLA *****
A54-154