European Fire Extinguishers


David Kurtz
 

So what does everyone do when it comes time to recertify European fire extinguishers in the United States?  The CO2 extinguisher for the engine room appears to be the original unit installed in 2003.  So far three fire extinguisher service companies have refused to certify it because it is not a DOT approved bottle.  I like the way it is mounted and the fact that it is a manual release.  Has anyone come across another bottle that fits in this space?


--
Dave Kurtz
SM2 #380
S/V Celtic Cross

Detroit, Michigan


Mark Erdos
 

You can probably get a replacement in Martinique, if that is in your plans.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of David Kurtz via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, April 13, 2021 7:14 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] European Fire Extinguishers

 

So what does everyone do when it comes time to recertify European fire extinguishers in the United States?  The CO2 extinguisher for the engine room appears to be the original unit installed in 2003.  So far three fire extinguisher service companies have refused to certify it because it is not a DOT approved bottle.  I like the way it is mounted and the fact that it is a manual release.  Has anyone come across another bottle that fits in this space?


--
Dave Kurtz
SM2 #380
S/V Celtic Cross

Detroit, Michigan


Arno Luijten
 

At that age you won’t find anyone re-certify those things anymore. 

I’m on Saint Martin and the fire guy there did not even look twice at those things and I had them replaced with new versions of the same. 


Regards,
Arno Luijten
SV Luna,
A54-121


Richard May
 

Arno,

Any chance you have a vendor and part number from where you replaced the extinguishers?  Could be on a receipt or a photo of the bottle.  I am looking at mine right now and was referred to a bigger company that can do grand automated systems for engine rooms but I am hesitant to change the Amel original setup.

And, has anyone given any thought to procedure for putting out a fire.  I was recently told the OEM bottle is a bit small for the engine room and beside, there better not be any air moving in there when you discharge...as in, better thinking about killing the engine and any other electronics that are live down there before discharging a bottle into it.
--
Richard May
SM 477 Avogato


Bill Kinney
 

Richard,

Before discharging the CO2, it is critical that you shut down the engine, generator, and blowers.  In a perfect world, this would be done automatically as part of the discharge process.  If the engines and blowers are running, they will very quickly remove the CO2.  With the fire location still hot, even if it was initially put out,  it will likely re-ignite right away.  This is just as important for boats with the older halon systems.

If you DO extinguish a fire with a CO2 or halon discharge, it is important NOT to open the engine room hatch for 20 or 30 minutes to allow things to cool off before reintroducing oxygen.  And before going down inside, be sure to run the ventilating blowers to be sure there is enough oxygen to breath.

Bill Kinney
Sm160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


Michael Winand
 

We installed the fireboy system, it is safe for the engine, as if it were to go off it won't destroy the interior of the engine,  the system has a auto shut down of the blowers and the engine. 
It has override in case you need to start the engine again. 
Michael Nebo sm251 

On Fri, 22 Oct 2021, 5:08 am Bill Kinney, <cruisingconsulting@...> wrote:
Richard,

Before discharging the CO2, it is critical that you shut down the engine, generator, and blowers.  In a perfect world, this would be done automatically as part of the discharge process.  If the engines and blowers are running, they will very quickly remove the CO2.  With the fire location still hot, even if it was initially put out,  it will likely re-ignite right away.  This is just as important for boats with the older halon systems.

If you DO extinguish a fire with a CO2 or halon discharge, it is important NOT to open the engine room hatch for 20 or 30 minutes to allow things to cool off before reintroducing oxygen.  And before going down inside, be sure to run the ventilating blowers to be sure there is enough oxygen to breath.

Bill Kinney
Sm160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


Ian Park
 

I replaced all my extinguishers last year and went for ‘water mist’ extinguishers, including the engine room. They operate by obliterating any space for oxygen. They can be used on cooking fat fires instead of a blanket. Three main criteria were that they don’t leave powder residue, just water, they don’t damage electrics and they are easier to recharge.
I have no evidence from real time situations, but the principles seem sound.

Ian. ‘Ocean Hobo’ SN96. UK