Fresh Water Tank cleaning with isopropyl alcohol


Gregory Dmitriev
 

Hi guys,
did anybody tried to use isopropyl alcohol to clean fresh water tank?
Considerations?

Thx!


James Alton
 

Greg, 

  Isopropyl is poisonous.  Perhaps all residue could be removed but I think chlorine products would be safer to use.  We opened all access hatches and hand scrubbed with soft scrub followed with lots of rinsing.  There was a lot of mud in the bottom of our tank aft along with a few snails.  Interestingly enough the water didn't smell or taste bad before the cleaning.  We use the Seagull to final. Filter our drinking water. 

James Alton
SV Sueno
Maramu #220


On Wed, 11 May 2022 at 12:56, Gregory Dmitriev
<41greg.marine@...> wrote:
Hi guys,
did anybody tried to use isopropyl alcohol to clean fresh water tank?
Considerations?

Thx!


Alan Leslie
 

Chlorine (bleach) is simple and easy....fill up the water tank, put some(?) bleach in, leave it for 12+ hours , pump it out, use a hose to spray inside the tank (use the inspection ports in front of the frig and forwards), fill it up, rinse a few times...pump out .. we use a Rule bilge pump lowered into the FW tank....use a swimming pool test strip until chorine is not detected...simple....if there was residual crap in the bottom I would suck it out with the wet/dry vac...I've never had to do that. 
I would be very wary of using isopropyl alcohol.......why would you want to use it ?
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Gregory Dmitriev
 

is isopropyl alcohol more poisonous than chlorine?????


 

image.png


CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
   


On Wed, May 11, 2022 at 7:08 AM Gregory Dmitriev <41greg.marine@...> wrote:
is isopropyl alcohol more poisonous than chlorine?????


Tony Elliott
 

When it comes to potable water, most of the industries world wide use Sodium Chlorite. It is a registered antimicrobial pesticide (EPA Register Number 5382-42). It's uses are potable (drinking) water, industrial cooling water, mollusk control, food plant process water, wastewater etc. The 80% pure flakes (which you can purchase on Amazon) require dilution with distilled water into a solution of 22.4% (which you can also purchase on Amazon) and then added to water that is in the tank, left for 24 to 48 hours and then flushed. If there is other dirt in the tank, that obviously will need removing but this is the safest and most inert way of sterilizing a potable water tank. 

Tony
SM#443 Grand Cru


James Alton
 

Gregory, 

   Both of course are poisonous.  Chlorine has been used to disenfect water systems for a long time so safe practices are pretty well documented. I am not sure that I have ever heard of alcohol being used to disenfect a water system but if one was to use alcohol, maybe use consumable ethanol.  I would however worry about whether alcohol might damage polyester resins. 

James Alton
SV Sueno


On Wed, 11 May 2022 at 15:08, Gregory Dmitriev
<41greg.marine@...> wrote:
is isopropyl alcohol more poisonous than chlorine?????


Bill Kinney
 

On Wed, May 11, 2022 at 05:08 AM, Gregory Dmitriev wrote:
is isopropyl alcohol more poisonous than chlorine?????
Well... yes, and no.  It is very unlikely that you could drink water containing a poisonous amount of chlorine. It is extremely irritating.  Chlorine can be easily removed from water chemically, or just by off-gassing.  IPA can not be made non-toxic, and is impossible to remove from water by normal methods and at low levels would not be easily detectable by taste in water.

But--in both cases, the dose makes the poison. 

Adding IPA to a tankful of water would be totally ineffective as a cleaning agent. IPA would only be useful if the tank was fully drained, and then IPA was used to scrub the walls.  Simply wetting or soaking would not be effective.  A complete rinse would then remove the scrubbed-off material and almost all the residual IPA.  If the tank was then air dried, the risk would be eliminated. Note carefully that pure IPA is rather flammable, and control of fumes and ignition sources would be needed. Safer to use 50/50 IPA/water. Good ventilation would also be needed to reduce the amount you breath in.  This method is more work than a chlorine soak, but has the advantage that it is not at all corrosive. It would also be the best way to clean a tank that had a significant biofilm ("slime") on the walls which is quite resistant to a simple Chlorine soak. If I was scrubbing the tank walls, I am pretty sure I could find a more convenient, safer, sanitizing cleaner than IPA, but it would work.

Chlorine can be added to a tank full of water and soaked, eliminating the scrubbing.  Drain the tank, rinse once, and you are back to levels that are safe to drink.  It's the standard approach for drinking water tank sanitization, and the procedure is well known and documented.  It has the advantage that it can clean the hoses and fittings throughout the system, which are frequently much "gunkier" than the tank.  Be aware that Chlorine at "shock treatment" levels is corrosive to many parts of the system and needs to be flushed away everywhere. If you are doing this, be sure that the concentrations, soak times, and overall procedure come from a knowledgable source, not just something some internet guy thinks sounds good. Start here: https://www.clorox.com/learn/how-to-sanitize-water-tank-with-bleach/

Many people over-clean their tanks, in my opinion. This became the cruiser's standard when people were traveling the world filling tanks with water from local sources that were of dubious safety.  A regular treatment with significant levels of chlorine was critical to avoiding illness from waterborne pathogens introduced to the tanks by taking on contaminated water. In tanks kept full with RO water there is not a dangerous level of pathogens, and very little for microorganisms to use as food. If the water looks good, and tastes good, we leave it alone and drink it.

We recently had the opportunity to open the forward chamber of our drinking water tank for the first time--ever.  After 25 years of near full term liveaboard use, the tank was clean enough we just put the cover back on. Our tank water is better tasting than almost all of the city water supplies we have come across. We generally keep the tanks as close to full as practical.  In the 6 years we have owned the boat we have never put any cleaning or sanitization agent in the tanks.  Chlorine is not used anywhere on our boat.  Not from toxicity concerns, but I prefer not to deal with the maintenance issues from the resulting corrosion.  Just as an example, toilet cleaners containing chlorine (almost all do!) slowly, but surely, corrode copper, which damages the copper riser in the holding tank, which eventually leads to a very nasty replacement project.
 
Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Simpson Bay Lagoon, Sint Maarten.


Paul Harries
 

As to toxicity:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK493181/
--
Paul Harries
Prospective Amel Buyer


Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

On advice from a company that cleans Household rainwater tanks I used Hydrgen Peroxide. 
Danny
SM 299
Ocean Pearl

On 11/05/2022 21:56 Gregory Dmitriev <41greg.marine@...> wrote:


Hi guys,
did anybody tried to use isopropyl alcohol to clean fresh water tank?
Considerations?

Thx!


Gregory Dmitriev
 

i’m not sure that they are concerned about coper and stainless still corrosion :(


On 11 May 2022, at 22:13, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@...> wrote:

On advice from a company that cleans Household rainwater tanks I used Hydrgen Peroxide. 
Danny
SM 299
Ocean Pearl
On 11/05/2022 21:56 Gregory Dmitriev <41greg.marine@...> wrote:


Hi guys,
did anybody tried to use isopropyl alcohol to clean fresh water tank?
Considerations?

Thx!


Paul Harries
 

Has anyone tried using an enzymatic cleaner to remove slime from tanks. 
Enzymatic cleaners are non corrosive but digest organic material such as slime. They also digest organic material that produces smells. They are used to clean surgical instruments. A good water rinse would be required afterwards.
--
Paul Harries
Prospective Amel Buyer


Gregory Dmitriev
 

Hi Bill,
looks clear, but why you recommend to use submergible pump instead of regular fresh water pump? If the chlorine solution (very diluted, like  5% of 1L ->50g to 900 L -> 0,005%) will go out through black water tanks and the bilge, would it also give extra disinfection?

Thx,

GD
A54 172


 

I recommend the submersible pump for 2 reasons:
  1. The boat's freshwater pump can be used, but it is probably not rated for continuous use. I say probably because the original pumps installed by Amel in the SN, SM, 54, 55 & 50 are not rated for continuous use, and how do I know what the previous owner(s) replaced the original pump with. Although it would not be continuous use, it would be a lot more than normal use.
  2. You should probably have a pump similar to the RULE 1500 to 3000 GPH submersible pump for lots of other reasons, including most insurance policies currently require more than the capacity of the gray water pump.
Bill


CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
   


On Thu, May 12, 2022 at 8:08 AM Gregory Dmitriev <41greg.marine@...> wrote:
Hi Bill,
looks clear, but why you recommend to use submergible pump instead of regular fresh water pump? If the chlorine solution (very diluted, like  5% of 1L ->50g to 900 L -> 0,005%) will go out through black water tanks and the bilge, would it also give extra disinfection?

Thx,

GD
A54 172


Mohammad Shirloo
 

We carry a 220 V trash pump that pumps about 2000 liters (500 gallons)/minute for emergencies. It is designed to continue pumping even with trash and other items that may be floating around, fits through the fresh water tank opening and empties out the entire 900 liters under a minute with a fire hose. We did weigh the risk/benefits of the 220V vs 24V and felt the risk of high voltage with a pump designed to work in wet and submersible environment, was worth the benefit of moving a considerable amount of water volume. It can be run off of the inverter and with the generator and full tank of diesel, the pump can run for days. We may also pick up a good 24V pump, to have both options, since they do not take much room. When you look at how much water can come in, even from a small hole/crack, being able to move a high quantity of water, provides valuable extra time to effect repairs.

 

Happy Sailing;

 

 

Mohammad and Aty

B&B Kokomo

AMEL 54 #099

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of CW Bill Rouse via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, May 12, 2022 8:18 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io Notification <main@amelyachtowners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Fresh Water Tank cleaning with isopropyl alcohol

 

I recommend the submersible pump for 2 reasons:

  1. The boat's freshwater pump can be used, but it is probably not rated for continuous use. I say probably because the original pumps installed by Amel in the SN, SM, 54, 55 & 50 are not rated for continuous use, and how do I know what the previous owner(s) replaced the original pump with. Although it would not be continuous use, it would be a lot more than normal use.
  2. You should probably have a pump similar to the RULE 1500 to 3000 GPH submersible pump for lots of other reasons, including most insurance policies currently require more than the capacity of the gray water pump.

Bill



CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School

720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 

   

 

On Thu, May 12, 2022 at 8:08 AM Gregory Dmitriev <41greg.marine@...> wrote:

Hi Bill,
looks clear, but why you recommend to use submergible pump instead of regular fresh water pump? If the chlorine solution (very diluted, like  5% of 1L ->50g to 900 L -> 0,005%) will go out through black water tanks and the bilge, would it also give extra disinfection?

Thx,

GD
A54 172


Ulrich Michael Dangelmeyer
 

Hi Mohammad & Aty,
Please, what’s the brand and type of this monster pump.
Professional firefighters equipment?
Thanks for Info 
Best 
Ulrich 
Soleil Bleu A54#088

Am 12.05.2022 um 19:44 schrieb Mohammad Shirloo <mshirloo@...>:



We carry a 220 V trash pump that pumps about 2000 liters (500 gallons)/minute for emergencies. It is designed to continue pumping even with trash and other items that may be floating around, fits through the fresh water tank opening and empties out the entire 900 liters under a minute with a fire hose. We did weigh the risk/benefits of the 220V vs 24V and felt the risk of high voltage with a pump designed to work in wet and submersible environment, was worth the benefit of moving a considerable amount of water volume. It can be run off of the inverter and with the generator and full tank of diesel, the pump can run for days. We may also pick up a good 24V pump, to have both options, since they do not take much room. When you look at how much water can come in, even from a small hole/crack, being able to move a high quantity of water, provides valuable extra time to effect repairs.

 

Happy Sailing;

 

 

Mohammad and Aty

B&B Kokomo

AMEL 54 #099

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of CW Bill Rouse via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, May 12, 2022 8:18 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io Notification <main@amelyachtowners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Fresh Water Tank cleaning with isopropyl alcohol

 

I recommend the submersible pump for 2 reasons:

  1. The boat's freshwater pump can be used, but it is probably not rated for continuous use. I say probably because the original pumps installed by Amel in the SN, SM, 54, 55 & 50 are not rated for continuous use, and how do I know what the previous owner(s) replaced the original pump with. Although it would not be continuous use, it would be a lot more than normal use.
  2. You should probably have a pump similar to the RULE 1500 to 3000 GPH submersible pump for lots of other reasons, including most insurance policies currently require more than the capacity of the gray water pump.

Bill



CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School

720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 

   

 

On Thu, May 12, 2022 at 8:08 AM Gregory Dmitriev <41greg.marine@...> wrote:

Hi Bill,
looks clear, but why you recommend to use submergible pump instead of regular fresh water pump? If the chlorine solution (very diluted, like  5% of 1L ->50g to 900 L -> 0,005%) will go out through black water tanks and the bilge, would it also give extra disinfection?

Thx,

GD
A54 172


Mohammad Shirloo
 

Hi Ulrich;

 

Picked it up from an industrial supply house in Montenegro. I’m not on board and don’t remember the exact model, but if you search for submersible trash pumps, you should get a few pop up. They are not small but not too large either. Ours barely fits through the fresh water tank access hole. This was important so the cleaning of the water tank is now quick and easy. We did notice some spots on the walls of the tank, added 9 liters of regular bleach to 900 for a 1% mix. Left it for 24 hours , pumped it out with the pump and flushed the tank with fresh water 3 times. Ended up with a spotless tank that looked brand new.

 

I’ll be on board end of next week. If you have problems finding one, let me know and I can send you a picture of the label on the pump. We also got a long fire hose, so we can place the pump anywhere on the boat. Still hoping that this pump never has to touch salt water.

 

Happy Sailing;

 

 

Mohammad and Aty

B&B Kokomo

AMEL 54 #099

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ulrich Michael Dangelmeyer via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, May 12, 2022 10:28 AM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Fresh Water Tank cleaning with isopropyl alcohol

 

Hi Mohammad & Aty,

Please, what’s the brand and type of this monster pump.

Professional firefighters equipment?

Thanks for Info 

Best 

Ulrich 

Soleil Bleu A54#088



Am 12.05.2022 um 19:44 schrieb Mohammad Shirloo <mshirloo@...>:



We carry a 220 V trash pump that pumps about 2000 liters (500 gallons)/minute for emergencies. It is designed to continue pumping even with trash and other items that may be floating around, fits through the fresh water tank opening and empties out the entire 900 liters under a minute with a fire hose. We did weigh the risk/benefits of the 220V vs 24V and felt the risk of high voltage with a pump designed to work in wet and submersible environment, was worth the benefit of moving a considerable amount of water volume. It can be run off of the inverter and with the generator and full tank of diesel, the pump can run for days. We may also pick up a good 24V pump, to have both options, since they do not take much room. When you look at how much water can come in, even from a small hole/crack, being able to move a high quantity of water, provides valuable extra time to effect repairs.

 

Happy Sailing;

 

 

Mohammad and Aty

B&B Kokomo

AMEL 54 #099

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of CW Bill Rouse via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, May 12, 2022 8:18 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io Notification <main@amelyachtowners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Fresh Water Tank cleaning with isopropyl alcohol

 

I recommend the submersible pump for 2 reasons:

  1. The boat's freshwater pump can be used, but it is probably not rated for continuous use. I say probably because the original pumps installed by Amel in the SN, SM, 54, 55 & 50 are not rated for continuous use, and how do I know what the previous owner(s) replaced the original pump with. Although it would not be continuous use, it would be a lot more than normal use.
  2. You should probably have a pump similar to the RULE 1500 to 3000 GPH submersible pump for lots of other reasons, including most insurance policies currently require more than the capacity of the gray water pump.

Bill



CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School

720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 

   

 

On Thu, May 12, 2022 at 8:08 AM Gregory Dmitriev <41greg.marine@...> wrote:

Hi Bill,
looks clear, but why you recommend to use submergible pump instead of regular fresh water pump? If the chlorine solution (very diluted, like  5% of 1L ->50g to 900 L -> 0,005%) will go out through black water tanks and the bilge, would it also give extra disinfection?

Thx,

GD
A54 172


Ulrich Michael Dangelmeyer
 

👏👍

Am 12.05.2022 um 20:51 schrieb Mohammad Shirloo <mshirloo@...>:



Hi Ulrich;

 

Picked it up from an industrial supply house in Montenegro. I’m not on board and don’t remember the exact model, but if you search for submersible trash pumps, you should get a few pop up. They are not small but not too large either. Ours barely fits through the fresh water tank access hole. This was important so the cleaning of the water tank is now quick and easy. We did notice some spots on the walls of the tank, added 9 liters of regular bleach to 900 for a 1% mix. Left it for 24 hours , pumped it out with the pump and flushed the tank with fresh water 3 times. Ended up with a spotless tank that looked brand new.

 

I’ll be on board end of next week. If you have problems finding one, let me know and I can send you a picture of the label on the pump. We also got a long fire hose, so we can place the pump anywhere on the boat. Still hoping that this pump never has to touch salt water.

 

Happy Sailing;

 

 

Mohammad and Aty

B&B Kokomo

AMEL 54 #099

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ulrich Michael Dangelmeyer via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, May 12, 2022 10:28 AM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Fresh Water Tank cleaning with isopropyl alcohol

 

Hi Mohammad & Aty,

Please, what’s the brand and type of this monster pump.

Professional firefighters equipment?

Thanks for Info 

Best 

Ulrich 

Soleil Bleu A54#088



Am 12.05.2022 um 19:44 schrieb Mohammad Shirloo <mshirloo@...>:



We carry a 220 V trash pump that pumps about 2000 liters (500 gallons)/minute for emergencies. It is designed to continue pumping even with trash and other items that may be floating around, fits through the fresh water tank opening and empties out the entire 900 liters under a minute with a fire hose. We did weigh the risk/benefits of the 220V vs 24V and felt the risk of high voltage with a pump designed to work in wet and submersible environment, was worth the benefit of moving a considerable amount of water volume. It can be run off of the inverter and with the generator and full tank of diesel, the pump can run for days. We may also pick up a good 24V pump, to have both options, since they do not take much room. When you look at how much water can come in, even from a small hole/crack, being able to move a high quantity of water, provides valuable extra time to effect repairs.

 

Happy Sailing;

 

 

Mohammad and Aty

B&B Kokomo

AMEL 54 #099

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of CW Bill Rouse via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, May 12, 2022 8:18 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io Notification <main@amelyachtowners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Fresh Water Tank cleaning with isopropyl alcohol

 

I recommend the submersible pump for 2 reasons:

  1. The boat's freshwater pump can be used, but it is probably not rated for continuous use. I say probably because the original pumps installed by Amel in the SN, SM, 54, 55 & 50 are not rated for continuous use, and how do I know what the previous owner(s) replaced the original pump with. Although it would not be continuous use, it would be a lot more than normal use.
  2. You should probably have a pump similar to the RULE 1500 to 3000 GPH submersible pump for lots of other reasons, including most insurance policies currently require more than the capacity of the gray water pump.

Bill



CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School

720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 

   

 

On Thu, May 12, 2022 at 8:08 AM Gregory Dmitriev <41greg.marine@...> wrote:

Hi Bill,
looks clear, but why you recommend to use submergible pump instead of regular fresh water pump? If the chlorine solution (very diluted, like  5% of 1L ->50g to 900 L -> 0,005%) will go out through black water tanks and the bilge, would it also give extra disinfection?

Thx,

GD
A54 172


rossirossix4
 

Bill,
Thanks for emphasizing the need for a portable pump for cleaning, de-watering and even emergency use. Got me to thinking--I'm going to cut and paste and edit  an earlier posting I made on this because I wanted to share and emphasize what I think are important characteristics of such a pump--1)portability, so you can easily take it to  the place you want to use it by grabbing it with a dedicated handle.  It needs to be ready to grab and go as a complete unit yet accessible and compact  2) a long cord to its power source so you can power it anywhere in the boat.  For us it is a 24v high capacity pump so we have a 30' power cord with alligator clips for attachment to the house batteries 3) an on off switch at the pump so once connected you can control it at the pump 4) a rigid pick up hose that will not collapse 5) a clog preventing intake screen on the pick up 6) a longer exit hose that can be thrown out a hatch or taken to the cockpit 7)a way to secure the electric pump above the water and to keep it from sliding around or damaging the interior of your boat.

So,  from a much earlier post......"Regarding a portable bilge pump we can show you what we have.  I had a high capacity 24V self-priming pump aboard and decided to make it into such a kit.  Management of a rigid intake hose, longer output hose, and 24V cord are all issues.  I came up with a design using a thin board with integrated handle, and a hour glass shape for managing the hoses and electrical cord.  The nylon cord that holds everything together can also be used to secure the pump in operation.  I think the suction hose was at least 1.5 meters, output hose 5 meters, and a 10 meter electrical cord with alligator clips.  The output hose can be a thin collapsible lightweight type hose that saves space. The carpenter at Yacht Marin in Turkey made me the board for $7USD!!!, and so for the cost of a switch, hoses we have a handy, organized, and compact unit that we hope never to use except for cleaning tasks.  Many of us carry a spare bilge pump around anyway, so here is an idea. Sorry you can't see the switch but it is a waterproof push pull mounted near the pump and the 24V cord with alligator clips is also there  https://www.dropbox.com/sc/xkgm3urt583wqzx/AAAHNL0aoLQ0aYM5SMruLZrqa
"
Bob and Suzanne, KAIMI SM429


 

Bob,

Good job!!!

Bill


CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
   


On Mon, May 16, 2022 at 1:15 AM rossirossix4 <rossidesigngroup@...> wrote:
Bill,
Thanks for emphasizing the need for a portable pump for cleaning, de-watering and even emergency use. Got me to thinking--I'm going to cut and paste and edit  an earlier posting I made on this because I wanted to share and emphasize what I think are important characteristics of such a pump--1)portability, so you can easily take it to  the place you want to use it by grabbing it with a dedicated handle.  It needs to be ready to grab and go as a complete unit yet accessible and compact  2) a long cord to its power source so you can power it anywhere in the boat.  For us it is a 24v high capacity pump so we have a 30' power cord with alligator clips for attachment to the house batteries 3) an on off switch at the pump so once connected you can control it at the pump 4) a rigid pick up hose that will not collapse 5) a clog preventing intake screen on the pick up 6) a longer exit hose that can be thrown out a hatch or taken to the cockpit 7)a way to secure the electric pump above the water and to keep it from sliding around or damaging the interior of your boat.

So,  from a much earlier post......"Regarding a portable bilge pump we can show you what we have.  I had a high capacity 24V self-priming pump aboard and decided to make it into such a kit.  Management of a rigid intake hose, longer output hose, and 24V cord are all issues.  I came up with a design using a thin board with integrated handle, and a hour glass shape for managing the hoses and electrical cord.  The nylon cord that holds everything together can also be used to secure the pump in operation.  I think the suction hose was at least 1.5 meters, output hose 5 meters, and a 10 meter electrical cord with alligator clips.  The output hose can be a thin collapsible lightweight type hose that saves space. The carpenter at Yacht Marin in Turkey made me the board for $7USD!!!, and so for the cost of a switch, hoses we have a handy, organized, and compact unit that we hope never to use except for cleaning tasks.  Many of us carry a spare bilge pump around anyway, so here is an idea. Sorry you can't see the switch but it is a waterproof push pull mounted near the pump and the 24V cord with alligator clips is also there  https://www.dropbox.com/sc/xkgm3urt583wqzx/AAAHNL0aoLQ0aYM5SMruLZrqa
"
Bob and Suzanne, KAIMI SM429