Fuel Bladders


Mark Erdos
 

I ask this more out of curiosity than anything else. What are people opinions of fuel bladders for excess diesel on longer passages?

 

I have seen some conversations where owners have bladders atop the aft cabin and lashed to the hand rails. To me, this seems like it would be a lot of weight in the wrong place. How does the fuel not cause a greater angle of heel and, the bigger question,  are the hand-hold railings strong enough to hold the weight of potentially shifting diesel (0.832kg/litre)?

 

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

www.creampuff.us

 


Colin - ex SV Island Pearl
 

Everyone will have different reasons for carrying so much fuel, and of course, this could be very different now due to some exceptional COVID related issues (for example, a close friend of ours recently had to sail directly across the Pacific all the way from Panama to Bundaberg, Australia) ....but for those just setting off and/or preparing to circumnavigate in an Amel SM, 54 or 55, rest assured that you will mostly find that with both your generous main tank fuel capacity, plus say 9 x 23L jerry cans (in our case all in the life-raft locker of the SM), you should have much more fuel than you would need for all the longest legs, even with many mild to windless days, and even with the occasional need potentially to run for many hours at very high revs to get away from the odd suspect pirate "fishing" boats who may try to catch you in certain areas.

We circumnavigated on an Amel SM2000 with the above setup between 2017 and 2020, always with plenty of fuel leftover even on all the longest stretches, with many days of zero to 10kts of wind in the South Atlantic and Pacific, plus in the North Indian Ocean (Thailand to the Maldives leg).

Colin Streeter
ex SM2K Island Pearl II
Brisbane, Australia

On Tue, Apr 6, 2021 at 3:48 AM Mark Erdos <mcerdos@...> wrote:

I ask this more out of curiosity than anything else. What are people opinions of fuel bladders for excess diesel on longer passages?

 

I have seen some conversations where owners have bladders atop the aft cabin and lashed to the hand rails. To me, this seems like it would be a lot of weight in the wrong place. How does the fuel not cause a greater angle of heel and, the bigger question,  are the hand-hold railings strong enough to hold the weight of potentially shifting diesel (0.832kg/litre)?

 

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

www.creampuff.us

 



--
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445


eric freedman
 

Hi Colin,

Instead of dealing with 9 jerry cans , why not have a pair of tanks fitted to the locker as we have done .

We use an electric pump to empty the tanks. That is much easier than having to deal with a jerry can in rolling sea. The reason I had 2 tanks fitted is that

you cannot fit one big 80-gallon tank through the hatch. Also, each tank is separate. In case of a major leak or contamination you will still have 80 gallons of good fuel.

Fair Winds,

Eric

Sm 376 Kimberlite

 

_._,_._,_


Colin - ex SV Island Pearl
 

Hi Eric

Yes, indeed your fixed tank idea is a far better idea, and I was aware of it from you before we set off around the world but too late for us to have enough time to get this done before leaving.

With our system, we always emptied the cans from the liferaft locker immediately as soon as we had created enough space in the main tank and whenever we had suitably calm conditions to do so to ensure the best possible stability. This was never a problem and we became quite skilled at doing so without spilling even a drop of fuel ... however ... of course, a nice easy electric pump system from your fixed tanks would be so much nicer to have.

The one possible advantage of our jerry can system (for us) though was that we very seldom ever trusted filling up directly from the fuel stations into our main tank during our circumnavigation as we always filtered all fuel first, unless in some French or UK territories, and so mostly did so via jerry cans anyway. Certainly, most of our fuel was sourced from normal "on-land" motor vehicle fuel stations via Jerry Can and Dinghy travel and so we would still have needed to store 10 empty cans somewhere anyway with your system.

Colin Streeter
ex SM2K - Island Pearl II
Brisbane 



On Wed, Apr 7, 2021 at 8:31 PM eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:

Hi Colin,

Instead of dealing with 9 jerry cans , why not have a pair of tanks fitted to the locker as we have done .

We use an electric pump to empty the tanks. That is much easier than having to deal with a jerry can in rolling sea. The reason I had 2 tanks fitted is that

you cannot fit one big 80-gallon tank through the hatch. Also, each tank is separate. In case of a major leak or contamination you will still have 80 gallons of good fuel.

Fair Winds,

Eric

Sm 376 Kimberlite

 



--
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445


rossirossix4
 

Hi Colin,
Last saw you as you were in your dinghy hanging onto our rail in Bequia to inform me of your decision to immediately move on through The Canal back to Austrailia. 

Just curious--even though you transfer from the cans to the tank when you can--by your calculations, did you ever need the extra fuel you carried?

Bob, KAIMI SM429


 

Bob,

For ocean crossings, we carried almost 200 liters of extra fuel in jerry cans in the port side deck locker. We never needed any of it and the lowest our 600-liter fuel tank got was about 1/2 full.

Bill
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Wed, Apr 7, 2021 at 9:27 AM rossirossix4 <rossidesigngroup@...> wrote:
Hi Colin,
Last saw you as you were in your dinghy hanging onto our rail in Bequia to inform me of your decision to immediately move on through The Canal back to Austrailia. 

Just curious--even though you transfer from the cans to the tank when you can--by your calculations, did you ever need the extra fuel you carried?

Bob, KAIMI SM429


Colin - ex SV Island Pearl
 

Hi Bob

Good to hear from you, and we trust you are doing well. I remember that Easter Sunday in 2019 very well when we chatted at Bequia. We had decided last minute on waking up that day not to spend another season in the Caribbean, and to sail directly to Panama departing that same day as it enabled us to transit the canal still in early May, plus sail all the Pacific Islands which we had not sailed before, plus still make it all the way back to Australia before COVID struck.

In answer to your question, we did not ever actually need all the extra 200L of fuel but always had emptied all of it into our tank before reaching our destinations. 

Please note we only filled those Jerry cans ahead of our longer trips and before spending 4 months in Indonesia (just in case) so 90% of the time they were empty on board in the locker and cleaned & dried out. Since we spent 4 months in Indonesia in many off the beaten tracks remote locations, where fuel was often black in colour, full of sticks, hairs and lots of dirt, and sold in old coke bottles on the side of the road from very dodgy suppliers we also filled all cans with good clean fuel in Australia, and so needed very little fuel all the way through till Singapore.

Having endured fuel issues on a previous yacht in Sydney Harbour and then almost been swept into a major car bridge in swift-running currents due to a fuel-related engine failure at the most difficult moment possible, I had become extremely cautious regarding fuel and so had fitted both dual Racor filters PLUS a large Fuel Polishing Unit ahead of leaving on our around the world trip. In addition, we also carried a portable WestMarine fuel filter and filtered all fuel when pouring from Jerry Cans into the main tanks, and then also periodically ran our large automatic fuel polisher to turn over all fuel in the main tank. This could rightly be seen by many here as overkill, however, that extra precaution, plus over-servicing the engine myself with good quality oils far more often than the engine manual suggested,  helped Lauren and I sleep better fortunately our little Yanmar 75HP always purred away happily all the way around the world never missing a beat.

Although we didn't ever need all that fuel I would do exactly the same again if we ever do another big lap.

Regards

Colin Streeter
ex Island Pearl II
Brisbane


On Thu, Apr 8, 2021 at 12:27 AM rossirossix4 <rossidesigngroup@...> wrote:
Hi Colin,
Last saw you as you were in your dinghy hanging onto our rail in Bequia to inform me of your decision to immediately move on through The Canal back to Austrailia. 

Just curious--even though you transfer from the cans to the tank when you can--by your calculations, did you ever need the extra fuel you carried?

Bob, KAIMI SM429



--
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445


rossirossix4
 

Hi Bill,
That's been my experience so far as well although I do subscribe to Collins idea of topping of the tank when I have had a chance.  Backfired on me in Gibraltar.  Filled my tank, left Queensway to the fuel dock to discover they wouldn't fill jerrys.  Evidently enterprising individuals were filling them up and selling the duty free diesel to locals!
Bob, KAIMI SM429


 

I had that issue in Gib. I told them I would fill them myself and on the boat. They agreed.
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Wed, Apr 7, 2021 at 3:36 PM rossirossix4 <rossidesigngroup@...> wrote:
Hi Bill,
That's been my experience so far as well although I do subscribe to Collins idea of topping of the tank when I have had a chance.  Backfired on me in Gibraltar.  Filled my tank, left Queensway to the fuel dock to discover they wouldn't fill jerrys.  Evidently enterprising individuals were filling them up and selling the duty free diesel to locals!
Bob, KAIMI SM429


Alan Leslie
 

Hi Colin,

We have the same setup and the jerry cans are very useful when there is no fuel dock.
The previous owner crossed the Atlantic and Pacific and never ran out of fuel.

Cheers
Alan
SM437 ...soon to return to Elyse in NZ !


Colin - ex SV Island Pearl
 

Hi Alan
Good to hear that you are soon able to get back to Elyse in NSW no doubt as part of the upcoming AU/NZ COVID travel bubble. Enjoy!
Best regards
Colin

On Thu, Apr 8, 2021 at 8:06 AM Alan Leslie <s.v.elyse@...> wrote:
Hi Colin,

We have the same setup and the jerry cans are very useful when there is no fuel dock.
The previous owner crossed the Atlantic and Pacific and never ran out of fuel.

Cheers
Alan
SM437 ...soon to return to Elyse in NZ !



--
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445


David Vogel
 

Hi all,

Re: did you ever need the extra fuel you carried?

We have 10x Jerry Cans for shore-to-boat transfers and longer passages, as described by others, stored on-deck. PLUS 3x 20ltr jerry cans with known clean fuel held inviolate in the port-side deck locker for fuel emergencies – the fuel rotated into the main tank and refilled with biocide & water treatment roughly every 12 months.

The deck jerries are used routinely to ferry fuel from shore, or to top up the main tank whilst underway or in remote localities – the deck fuel normally not more than 6-months old. A downside of using the deck-jerries so regularly, is that the lip-seals on some are starting to split, and so no longer fuel- (or water) proof. (At least one lip-seal falling foul to the over-enthusiastic efforts of a friendly and very helpful service-station attendant in French Polynesia – my bad for not maintaining adequate oversight.)

As to the question have we ever really needed the extra fuel? We necessarily tapped into the deck reserves twice.
Both during COVID times.

The first during lockdown, which occurred immediately after an unscheduled break in the supply ships delivering fuel stocks to the island – so refuelling was down to 20ltr per person per day, and I didn’t foresee the imminent need to keep everything topped up. And, then during lockdown, refuelling was not possible at all. I was very pleased to have the extra fuel already on-board …

The second whilst anchored out for extended periods in the Tuamotus. We could have decided to leave and head back to ‘civilisation’ earlier to refuel, but having the extra fuel on-board provided welcome flexibility and options to remain away from population centres while COVID was circuiting throughout the various communities. Noting that medical facilities in the more remote areas comprise a nursing station (if you’re lucky), so an extra-precautionary approach to minimising exposure was appropriate for our circumstances.

I also enjoy the extra flexibility in passage planning and execution – if we wish, or need, to burn fuel to power through a calm, or to make that pass on the next tide, then generally useable fuel is not a key consideration.

Bearing in mind that we presently have only 400W of solar, so are more reliant on the genset that many other AMELs. We are planning a solar upgrade, at which time we will downsize the auxiliary fuel capacity, and store 160ltr in the port-side deck locker as others have been doing (and will then be glad to return to the “clean decks” we once enjoyed).

David
Perigee, SM#396


From: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of rossirossix4 <rossidesigngroup@gmail.com>
Reply-To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Date: Wednesday, 7 April 2021 at 4:27 am
To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Fuel Bladders

Hi Colin,
Last saw you as you were in your dinghy hanging onto our rail in Bequia to inform me of your decision to immediately move on through The Canal back to Austrailia. 

Just curious--even though you transfer from the cans to the tank when you can--by your calculations, did you ever need the extra fuel you carried?

Bob, KAIMI SM429


 

David,

In our 10 years and 40,000 miles, we never needed the 190 extra liters and most of the miles we didn't have solar.

If we were to do it again, we would probably not carry extra fuel, but would have about 800 watts of solar. 

Best,

CW Bill Rouse 
Amel Owners Yacht School
+1 832-380-4970 | brouse@...
720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com 
Yacht School Calendar: www.preparetocastoff.blogspot.com/p/calendar.html


   


On Tue, Jun 1, 2021, 1:50 PM David Vogel <david.vogel@...> wrote:
Hi all,

Re: did you ever need the extra fuel you carried?

We have 10x Jerry Cans for shore-to-boat transfers and longer passages, as described by others, stored on-deck.  PLUS 3x 20ltr jerry cans with known clean fuel held inviolate in the port-side deck locker for fuel emergencies – the fuel rotated into the main tank and refilled with biocide & water treatment roughly every 12 months.

The deck jerries are used routinely to ferry fuel from shore, or to top up the main tank whilst underway or in remote localities – the deck fuel normally not more than 6-months old. A downside of using the deck-jerries so regularly, is that the lip-seals on some are starting to split, and so no longer fuel- (or water) proof.  (At least one lip-seal falling foul to the over-enthusiastic efforts of a friendly and very helpful service-station attendant in French Polynesia – my bad for not maintaining adequate oversight.)

As to the question have we ever really needed the extra fuel?  We necessarily tapped into the deck reserves twice.
Both during COVID times.

The first during lockdown, which occurred immediately after an unscheduled break in the supply ships delivering fuel stocks to the island – so refuelling was down to 20ltr per person per day, and I didn’t foresee the imminent need to keep everything topped up. And, then during lockdown, refuelling was not possible at all.  I was very pleased to have the extra fuel already on-board …

The second whilst anchored out for extended periods in the Tuamotus.  We could have decided to leave and head back to ‘civilisation’ earlier to refuel, but having the extra fuel on-board provided welcome flexibility and options to remain away from population centres while COVID was circuiting throughout the various communities.  Noting that medical facilities in the more remote areas comprise a nursing station (if you’re lucky), so an extra-precautionary approach to minimising exposure was appropriate for our circumstances.

I also enjoy the extra flexibility in passage planning and execution – if we wish, or need, to burn fuel to power through a calm, or to make that pass on the next tide, then generally useable fuel is not a key consideration.

Bearing in mind that we presently have only 400W of solar, so are more reliant on the genset that many other AMELs.  We are planning a solar upgrade, at which time we will downsize the auxiliary fuel capacity, and store 160ltr in the port-side deck locker as others have been doing (and will then be glad to return to the “clean decks” we once enjoyed).

David
Perigee, SM#396


From: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of rossirossix4 <rossidesigngroup@...>
Reply-To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Date: Wednesday, 7 April 2021 at 4:27 am
To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Fuel Bladders

Hi Colin,
Last saw you as you were in your dinghy hanging onto our rail in Bequia to inform me of your decision to immediately move on through The Canal back to Austrailia. 

Just curious--even though you transfer from the cans to the tank when you can--by your calculations, did you ever need the extra fuel you carried?

Bob, KAIMI SM429










Germain Jean-Pierre
 

Bill Rouse, 

We concur with your view: we have 1 X 20 litre of diesel and 1 X 20 litre gasoline for the outboard. Neither one was used during our longest sea legs

Jean-Pierre Germain, Eleuthera SM007


On 2/06/2021, at 8:00 AM, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:


David,

In our 10 years and 40,000 miles, we never needed the 190 extra liters and most of the miles we didn't have solar.

If we were to do it again, we would probably not carry extra fuel, but would have about 800 watts of solar. 

Best,

CW Bill Rouse 
Amel Owners Yacht School
+1 832-380-4970 | brouse@...
720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com 
Yacht School Calendar: www.preparetocastoff.blogspot.com/p/calendar.html


   

On Tue, Jun 1, 2021, 1:50 PM David Vogel <david.vogel@...> wrote:
Hi all,

Re: did you ever need the extra fuel you carried?

We have 10x Jerry Cans for shore-to-boat transfers and longer passages, as described by others, stored on-deck.  PLUS 3x 20ltr jerry cans with known clean fuel held inviolate in the port-side deck locker for fuel emergencies – the fuel rotated into the main tank and refilled with biocide & water treatment roughly every 12 months.

The deck jerries are used routinely to ferry fuel from shore, or to top up the main tank whilst underway or in remote localities – the deck fuel normally not more than 6-months old. A downside of using the deck-jerries so regularly, is that the lip-seals on some are starting to split, and so no longer fuel- (or water) proof.  (At least one lip-seal falling foul to the over-enthusiastic efforts of a friendly and very helpful service-station attendant in French Polynesia – my bad for not maintaining adequate oversight.)

As to the question have we ever really needed the extra fuel?  We necessarily tapped into the deck reserves twice.
Both during COVID times.

The first during lockdown, which occurred immediately after an unscheduled break in the supply ships delivering fuel stocks to the island – so refuelling was down to 20ltr per person per day, and I didn’t foresee the imminent need to keep everything topped up. And, then during lockdown, refuelling was not possible at all.  I was very pleased to have the extra fuel already on-board …

The second whilst anchored out for extended periods in the Tuamotus.  We could have decided to leave and head back to ‘civilisation’ earlier to refuel, but having the extra fuel on-board provided welcome flexibility and options to remain away from population centres while COVID was circuiting throughout the various communities.  Noting that medical facilities in the more remote areas comprise a nursing station (if you’re lucky), so an extra-precautionary approach to minimising exposure was appropriate for our circumstances.

I also enjoy the extra flexibility in passage planning and execution – if we wish, or need, to burn fuel to power through a calm, or to make that pass on the next tide, then generally useable fuel is not a key consideration.

Bearing in mind that we presently have only 400W of solar, so are more reliant on the genset that many other AMELs.  We are planning a solar upgrade, at which time we will downsize the auxiliary fuel capacity, and store 160ltr in the port-side deck locker as others have been doing (and will then be glad to return to the “clean decks” we once enjoyed).

David
Perigee, SM#396


From: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of rossirossix4 <rossidesigngroup@...>
Reply-To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Date: Wednesday, 7 April 2021 at 4:27 am
To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Fuel Bladders

Hi Colin,
Last saw you as you were in your dinghy hanging onto our rail in Bequia to inform me of your decision to immediately move on through The Canal back to Austrailia. 

Just curious--even though you transfer from the cans to the tank when you can--by your calculations, did you ever need the extra fuel you carried?

Bob, KAIMI SM429










David Vogel
 

Yes, I agree with both Bill R & JP,

We have not absolutely needed the extra fuel for ‘underway’ point-to-point passage-making. But we have needed it due to the interruption of the normal supply line, or exercising the option we had (due to having ~800 litres on-board) to stay away from population centres for extended periods. Both of these events responding to or resulting from COVID and directly-related circumstances. Sometime, we have expected to be able to fuel up monthly, but with a 3-month delay until the next fuel supplies arrive on-island (or anywhere within 500nm). We were glad to have the extra fuel on-board in these cases.

Perhaps the point I wish to make is that - for prolonged remote-area cruising where sometimes one is held in a remote area/s due to circumstances not of your choosing - everything (such as supply lines, including fuel supplies to remote island archipelagos) has changed due to COVID, and what worked in prior years may not work so well in future.

Supply chain management: we are also seeing reduced availability of spare parts, and greater delays (or more expense to reduce the delay) of various (otherwise normally available items) – even such mundane items as oil filters. Folks planning to head out into the wild blue yonder may beneficially review their on-board spares & consumables holdings accordingly. Also, choose your freight company with care.

For example, using FEDEX out of the US, to French Polynesia, results in items ending up in NZ (with no onwards to FP). A simply request for a re-direct has resulted in item/s been forwarded to Australia (abandon all hope). If you are fortunate enough to able to actually get someone to physically locate your item in NZ, then it can be sent from NZ to Europe, and from there re-consigned to FP. Or, choose a US supplier that in the first place will ship via DHL. Or, choose a supplier in Europe, not the US.

The world has changed in strange ways. And it is not as simple as it once was, not that it was ‘simple’ in the first place.

Best to all.

David
Perigee, SM#396


From: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of Germain Jean-Pierre <jp.germain45@gmail.com>
Reply-To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Date: Tuesday, 1 June 2021 at 11:05 am
To: <main@amelyachtowners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Fuel Bladders

Bill Rouse, 

We concur with your view: we have 1 X 20 litre of diesel and 1 X 20 litre gasoline for the outboard. Neither one was used during our longest sea legs

Jean-Pierre Germain, Eleuthera SM007

On 2/06/2021, at 8:00 AM, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@gmail.com> wrote:

David,

In our 10 years and 40,000 miles, we never needed the 190 extra liters and most of the miles we didn't have solar.

If we were to do it again, we would probably not carry extra fuel, but would have about 800 watts of solar. 
Best,

CW Bill Rouse 
Amel Owners Yacht School
+1 832-380-4970 | brouse@gmail.com
720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com 
Yacht School Calendar: www.preparetocastoff.blogspot.com/p/calendar.html


   

On Tue, Jun 1, 2021, 1:50 PM David Vogel <david.vogel@westnet.com.au> wrote:
Hi all,

Re: did you ever need the extra fuel you carried?

We have 10x Jerry Cans for shore-to-boat transfers and longer passages, as described by others, stored on-deck.  PLUS 3x 20ltr jerry cans with known clean fuel held inviolate in the port-side deck locker for fuel emergencies – the fuel rotated into the main tank and refilled with biocide & water treatment roughly every 12 months.

The deck jerries are used routinely to ferry fuel from shore, or to top up the main tank whilst underway or in remote localities – the deck fuel normally not more than 6-months old. A downside of using the deck-jerries so regularly, is that the lip-seals on some are starting to split, and so no longer fuel- (or water) proof.  (At least one lip-seal falling foul to the over-enthusiastic efforts of a friendly and very helpful service-station attendant in French Polynesia – my bad for not maintaining adequate oversight.)

As to the question have we ever really needed the extra fuel?  We necessarily tapped into the deck reserves twice.
Both during COVID times.

The first during lockdown, which occurred immediately after an unscheduled break in the supply ships delivering fuel stocks to the island – so refuelling was down to 20ltr per person per day, and I didn’t foresee the imminent need to keep everything topped up. And, then during lockdown, refuelling was not possible at all.  I was very pleased to have the extra fuel already on-board …

The second whilst anchored out for extended periods in the Tuamotus.  We could have decided to leave and head back to ‘civilisation’ earlier to refuel, but having the extra fuel on-board provided welcome flexibility and options to remain away from population centres while COVID was circuiting throughout the various communities.  Noting that medical facilities in the more remote areas comprise a nursing station (if you’re lucky), so an extra-precautionary approach to minimising exposure was appropriate for our circumstances.

I also enjoy the extra flexibility in passage planning and execution – if we wish, or need, to burn fuel to power through a calm, or to make that pass on the next tide, then generally useable fuel is not a key consideration.

Bearing in mind that we presently have only 400W of solar, so are more reliant on the genset that many other AMELs.  We are planning a solar upgrade, at which time we will downsize the auxiliary fuel capacity, and store 160ltr in the port-side deck locker as others have been doing (and will then be glad to return to the “clean decks” we once enjoyed).

David
Perigee, SM#396


From: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of rossirossix4 <rossidesigngroup@gmail.com>
Reply-To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Date: Wednesday, 7 April 2021 at 4:27 am
To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Fuel Bladders

Hi Colin,
Last saw you as you were in your dinghy hanging onto our rail in Bequia to inform me of your decision to immediately move on through The Canal back to Austrailia. 

Just curious--even though you transfer from the cans to the tank when you can--by your calculations, did you ever need the extra fuel you carried?

Bob, KAIMI SM429


Scott SV Tengah
 

On our 54, we have 900 liters tankage and have never felt like we would run out of fuel. From March 22, 2020 (start of Covid) until sometime in July 2020, we made a nearly 4900 nautical mile passage between Panama and Hawaii with a week of sub 10 knot winds. We weren't full when we left Panama and we arrived into Hawaii with around 600 liters remaining and didn't get to a fuel dock until the third island we visited. 

Carrying fuel is not without risk. On the rail, you have concerns about a big wave taking it overboard or water leaking past leaking cap seals. A leak inside a locker would be a nightmare, imo.

My personal strategy is more solar (we have 960w), efficient charging (eg - lithium) and light wind sails. We don't use our genset much but I would think that relying on that adds Onan reliability concerns on top of fuel availability concerns. As David mentioned, this last year, getting parts into French Polynesia was an absolute nightmare.

Better to reduce your reliance on diesel. And it's good for the environment, to boot.



--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Ken Powers SV Aquarius
 

On Aquarius we have the standard 600 liter tank, and when we crossed the Pacific we had 8 x 25liter plastic jerry cans, and 2 x 25liter stainless steel jerry cans.  Z and I were very worried we would run out of fuel, and filled everything we could before departing Salinas Ecuador for the 3500 nautical mile crossing to Hiva Oa.  We didn't need any of the fuel on deck.  But, I did have to transfer all the fuel into my tank after we arrived in Hiva Oa, what a waste of time!  I think the price of fuel was the same in Ecuador as Hiva Oa, so just made more work for myself.  We burned about 300 liters of fuel on that crossing.   

I don't think I would never do that again.  I do however always carry a few jerry cans of fuel in case my main fuel tank gets fouled.  And, I may want to carry more fuel in the future if I'm going someplace that has super expensive fuel, but I will not carry extra fuel just for a crossing.  Almost everyone I know crossed the Pacific and arrived Hiva Oa with more than 1/2 a tank remaining without using any fuel strapped to their decks.  I believe Henri Amel knew how to design a sailboat for crossings, and Henri knew haw big to make the fuel tank.   But, if you plan to stay in a location that has no fuel for a long time, or you want to become a fuel carrier for other boats that were not designed to circumnavigate, add more tankage.

With all the solar, the gensets are running less and less, thus another reason not to carry additional fuel.

Ken Powers
Aquarius
SM2K#262