Topics

Genoa Chain Plate bolts Leaking in aft hanging closet


Ken Powers SV Aquarius
 

Hello Amelians, 

Aquarius has sprung a leak in the aft closet.   I have traced it back to one of the 4 bolts holding the Genoa chainplate in place.  Has anyone else had this problem, and are there any secrets to removing these 4 bolts and repairing the leak?   I can only see the bolt heads in the closet, and can't get to whatever these bolts are threaded into.   Looks like they are somehow threaded into the bottom of the Genoa chainplate which is under the rub rail.

Any help appreciated!

Thanks All!

Ken Powers
Aquarius SM2K #262


Paul Osterberg
 

You will find the bolts under the rub rail, we had our rub rail removed a few yeas ago when repainting. 
Paul on SY Kerpa SM#259


Ken Powers SV Aquarius
 
Edited

Hello Paul,

Thanks for the response.  Are there nuts under the rub rail, because the bolt heads are in the closet?  Or, are the bolts threaded into the chainplate somehow?  Other questions...  There is also one bolt head holding the chainplate to the side of the boat for the outside.  This single bolt head is near the middle of the chain plate facing out.  Is this bolt treaded into a nut embedded in fiberglass, or will I have to find the nut on the inside of the boat.  I can't see at this time where the nut would be.  Also, anyone that has had the problem know the correct way to repair the leak?  I am worried about putting on a bunch of sealant on the stainless steel which may promote the stainless steel to corrode.

Thanks for the help.

Ken
Aquarius SM2K#262
Currently in Thailand


Ken Powers SV Aquarius
 
Edited

Hello All,

I pulled the rub rail up from aft to the chainplate, and now can see the nuts.  Does anyone have a procedure how to reseal the chainplate bolt holes?  Should I remove the entire chainplate, or just remove each bolt and fill the hole with sealant?  What type of sealant is best for this job?

Thanks,

Ken Powers
Aquarius SM2K#262
Thailand


eric freedman
 

Hi Ken
Do you have any photos?
Fair Winds
Eric
Sm 376 Kimberlite

On October 13, 2020 at 11:33 PM Ken Powers SV Aquarius <ken@...> wrote:

[Edited Message Follows]

Hello All,

I pulled the rub rail up from aft to the chainplate, and now can see the nuts.  Does anyone have a procedure how to reseal the chainplate bolt holes?  Should I remove the entire chainplate, or just remove each bolt and fill the hole with sealant?  What type of sealant is best for this job?

Thanks,

Ken Powers
Aquarius SM2K#262
Thailand

 


Ken Powers SV Aquarius
 

Hi Erik,

Here are some photos of the job at hand!  I talked with some local boaties here at Krabi Boat Lagoon, and they suggested 5200.  It has been raining for 5 days straight, and looks like it will continue for the next 6 days. I am thinking once it stops for a day or two, I will do the following.

1.  Remove 1 or 2 of the bolts.  Not to remove the entire chainplate.
2.  Clean hole and bolt with alcohol.
3.  Put good amount of 5200 into hole.
4. Replace bolt or bolts and try to get as much of the 5200 off the treads.  So that I don't glue the nut onto the bolt.
      I am told that this will not be a problem, any thoughts? 
5.  Repeat until finished with all the bolts.  Except, I am only planing to do the 4 bottom bolts under the rub rail, not the single bolt in the middle of the chainplate.  This bolt does not show signs of leaking, and even if it did, the leak should be at most, minor, due to the location.  Unlike the 4 bottom bolts which could submersed in water for extended periods of time.  And thoughts about this decision?
6. Glue interior back together.  Still wondering what adhesive to use to re-attach the interior lining.   It's like Humpty Dumpty, just hope I don't need all the Kings Horses, and all the Kings men.
7. Replace Rub Rail rubber piece.

Anyone have thoughts about my intended procedure?

Ken
Aquarius SM2K#262
In Krabi Boat Lagoon, Thailand


eric freedman
 

Hi Ken,
Thanks for the photos.
I would prefer to use 4200 over 5200. 5200 is very permanent. Is there a reason you want to use a strong adhesive versus a strong sealant?
The bolts are doing the adhesion, I think you just need to waterproof the bolt holes. The area around the holes might be rotten and the bolts might be corroded due to anaerobic corrosion. I had this happen on another boat of mine. I was on one side of a chain plate with a wrench on the bolt. I asked my friend to turn the bolt. He said he was turning it. nothing was happening on my end.
The bolt was completely corroded through .
Fair Winds,
Eric

On October 14, 2020 at 2:30 AM Ken Powers SV Aquarius <ken@...> wrote:

Hi Erik,

Here are some photos of the job at hand!  I talked with some local boaties here at Krabi Boat Lagoon, and they suggested 5200.  It has been raining for 5 days straight, and looks like it will continue for the next 6 days. I am thinking once it stops for a day or two, I will do the following.

1.  Remove 1 or 2 of the bolts.  Not to remove the entire chainplate.
2.  Clean hole and bolt with alcohol.
3.  Put good amount of 5200 into hole.
4. Replace bolt or bolts and try to get as much of the 5200 off the treads.  So that I don't glue the nut onto the bolt.
      I am told that this will not be a problem, any thoughts? 
5.  Repeat until finished with all the bolts.  Except, I am only planing to do the 4 bottom bolts under the rub rail, not the single bolt in the middle of the chainplate.  This bolt does not show signs of leaking, and even if it did, the leak should be at most, minor, due to the location.  Unlike the 4 bottom bolts which could submersed in water for extended periods of time.  And thoughts about this decision?
6. Glue interior back together.  Still wondering what adhesive to use to re-attach the interior lining.   It's like Humpty Dumpty, just hope I don't need all the Kings Horses, and all the Kings men.
7. Replace Rub Rail rubber piece.

Anyone have thoughts about my intended procedure?

Ken
Aquarius SM2K#262
In Krabi Boat Lagoon, Thailand

 


James Cromie
 

Hi Ken.  
Sounds like a good plan.  
I have found that 5200 on the threads doesn’t present any great difficult in removing the hardware down the road if needed.  The greater challenge is avoiding getting that gooey marshmellow on everything else!

I have found simple contact cement  or some version of that works just fine for reapplying loose edges of headliner.  

Use acetone instead of alcohol - better for removing all residue from surfaces prior to applying adhesive.  Just be careful not to get it on any plexiglass in the process.

Best,
James
Soteria
SM2K 347, Anacortes

On Oct 13, 2020, at 23:30, Ken Powers SV Aquarius <ken@...> wrote:

Hi Erik,

Here are some photos of the job at hand!  I talked with some local boaties here at Krabi Boat Lagoon, and they suggested 5200.  It has been raining for 5 days straight, and looks like it will continue for the next 6 days. I am thinking once it stops for a day or two, I will do the following.

1.  Remove 1 or 2 of the bolts.  Not to remove the entire chainplate.
2.  Clean hole and bolt with alcohol.
3.  Put good amount of 5200 into hole.
4. Replace bolt or bolts and try to get as much of the 5200 off the treads.  So that I don't glue the nut onto the bolt.
      I am told that this will not be a problem, any thoughts? 
5.  Repeat until finished with all the bolts.  Except, I am only planing to do the 4 bottom bolts under the rub rail, not the single bolt in the middle of the chainplate.  This bolt does not show signs of leaking, and even if it did, the leak should be at most, minor, due to the location.  Unlike the 4 bottom bolts which could submersed in water for extended periods of time.  And thoughts about this decision?
6. Glue interior back together.  Still wondering what adhesive to use to re-attach the interior lining.   It's like Humpty Dumpty, just hope I don't need all the Kings Horses, and all the Kings men.
7. Replace Rub Rail rubber piece.

Anyone have thoughts about my intended procedure?

Ken
Aquarius SM2K#262
In Krabi Boat Lagoon, Thailand <DSC08697.JPG><DSC08698.JPG><DSC08691.JPG><DSC08684.JPG>


david bruce
 

Hi Ken, 

 I’d second Eric’s suggestion to use 4200 (or Sikaflex 291), 5200 is primarily an adhesive, not really needed in your application, additionally they are more flexible than 5200 thus less likely to micro crack over time.   Just a heads up on a couple other issues I came across, neither 4200 or 5200 specifically mentions using on SS, just aluminum or (other metals), there have been accounts of 5200 curing poorly or not at all in very hot, humid climates and a couple years ago there was a major recall of defective 5200 in Australia. ( not sure where it all went, Thailand perhaps? :),  As far as the headliner, I haven’t had much luck w contact cement but Barge cement works well, used for shoe soles initially, just thin layer both sides, let dry, put together, (and need to get it right the first time, won’t readily come apart to flatten wrinkles etc.  Good luck. 

Dave Bruce
Liesse SN006
Preveza



On Oct 13, 2020, at 11:52 PM, eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:

Hi Ken, 
Thanks for the photos. 
I would prefer to use 4200 over 5200. 5200 is very permanent. Is there a reason you want to use a strong adhesive versus a strong sealant? 
The bolts are doing the adhesion, I think you just need to waterproof the bolt holes. The area around the holes might be rotten and the bolts might be corroded due to anaerobic corrosion. I had this happen on another boat of mine. I was on one side of a chain plate with a wrench on the bolt. I asked my friend to turn the bolt. He said he was turning it. nothing was happening on my end. 
The bolt was completely corroded through . 
Fair Winds, 
Eric 

On October 14, 2020 at 2:30 AM Ken Powers SV Aquarius <ken@...> wrote: 

Hi Erik, 

Here are some photos of the job at hand!  I talked with some local boaties here at Krabi Boat Lagoon, and they suggested 5200.  It has been raining for 5 days straight, and looks like it will continue for the next 6 days. I am thinking once it stops for a day or two, I will do the following. 

1.  Remove 1 or 2 of the bolts.  Not to remove the entire chainplate. 
2.  Clean hole and bolt with alcohol. 
3.  Put good amount of 5200 into hole. 
4. Replace bolt or bolts and try to get as much of the 5200 off the treads.  So that I don't glue the nut onto the bolt. 
      I am told that this will not be a problem, any thoughts?  
5.  Repeat until finished with all the bolts.  Except, I am only planing to do the 4 bottom bolts under the rub rail, not the single bolt in the middle of the chainplate.  This bolt does not show signs of leaking, and even if it did, the leak should be at most, minor, due to the location.  Unlike the 4 bottom bolts which could submersed in water for extended periods of time.  And thoughts about this decision? 
6. Glue interior back together.  Still wondering what adhesive to use to re-attach the interior lining.   It's like Humpty Dumpty, just hope I don't need all the Kings Horses, and all the Kings men. 
7. Replace Rub Rail rubber piece. 

Anyone have thoughts about my intended procedure? 

Ken 
Aquarius SM2K#262 
In Krabi Boat Lagoon, Thailand 

 


eric freedman
 

Hi David,
What you are referring to as Barge cement sounds exactly like Contact cement is applied. My shoemaker uses contact cement. It is also used to adhere laminates such as Formica to countertops.
Fair Winds,
Eric

On October 14, 2020 at 3:09 AM david bruce <davidcbruce57@...> wrote:

Hi Ken, 

 I’d second Eric’s suggestion to use 4200 (or Sikaflex 291), 5200 is primarily an adhesive, not really needed in your application, additionally they are more flexible than 5200 thus less likely to micro crack over time.   Just a heads up on a couple other issues I came across, neither 4200 or 5200 specifically mentions using on SS, just aluminum or (other metals), there have been accounts of 5200 curing poorly or not at all in very hot, humid climates and a couple years ago there was a major recall of defective 5200 in Australia. ( not sure where it all went, Thailand perhaps? :),  As far as the headliner, I haven’t had much luck w contact cement but Barge cement works well, used for shoe soles initially, just thin layer both sides, let dry, put together, (and need to get it right the first time, won’t readily come apart to flatten wrinkles etc.  Good luck. 

Dave Bruce
Liesse SN006
Preveza



On Oct 13, 2020, at 11:52 PM, eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:

Hi Ken, 
Thanks for the photos. 
I would prefer to use 4200 over 5200. 5200 is very permanent. Is there a reason you want to use a strong adhesive versus a strong sealant? 
The bolts are doing the adhesion, I think you just need to waterproof the bolt holes. The area around the holes might be rotten and the bolts might be corroded due to anaerobic corrosion. I had this happen on another boat of mine. I was on one side of a chain plate with a wrench on the bolt. I asked my friend to turn the bolt. He said he was turning it. nothing was happening on my end. 
The bolt was completely corroded through . 
Fair Winds, 
Eric 

On October 14, 2020 at 2:30 AM Ken Powers SV Aquarius <ken@...> wrote: 

Hi Erik, 

Here are some photos of the job at hand!  I talked with some local boaties here at Krabi Boat Lagoon, and they suggested 5200.  It has been raining for 5 days straight, and looks like it will continue for the next 6 days. I am thinking once it stops for a day or two, I will do the following. 

1.  Remove 1 or 2 of the bolts.  Not to remove the entire chainplate. 
2.  Clean hole and bolt with alcohol. 
3.  Put good amount of 5200 into hole. 
4. Replace bolt or bolts and try to get as much of the 5200 off the treads.  So that I don't glue the nut onto the bolt. 
      I am told that this will not be a problem, any thoughts?  
5.  Repeat until finished with all the bolts.  Except, I am only planing to do the 4 bottom bolts under the rub rail, not the single bolt in the middle of the chainplate.  This bolt does not show signs of leaking, and even if it did, the leak should be at most, minor, due to the location.  Unlike the 4 bottom bolts which could submersed in water for extended periods of time.  And thoughts about this decision? 
6. Glue interior back together.  Still wondering what adhesive to use to re-attach the interior lining.   It's like Humpty Dumpty, just hope I don't need all the Kings Horses, and all the Kings men. 
7. Replace Rub Rail rubber piece. 

Anyone have thoughts about my intended procedure? 

Ken 
Aquarius SM2K#262 
In Krabi Boat Lagoon, Thailand 

 


 

 


James Alton
 

Ken,

    My boat is a 1987 Maramu so consider this information general in nature to your situation.  I would suggest that you start by removing one bolt  to see what kind of sealant was used originally.  If you find that silicone caulking was used it will be the easiest to go back again with the same material since most products will not bond well to silicone.   If the original caulking is silicone and you want to use the 5200,  you will need to mechanically remove all traces of the silicone to get a good bond.  Regardless of the sealant to be used,  I would suggest removing as much of the original sealant as possible since your best bond will be to the fiberglass and metal surfaces.  One upside to the 5200 in your rainy situation is that it won't care if it gets wet during the curing process but silicones can work fine as a sealant too.  Just be really sure that the surfaces you are applying the caulking to are dry to get the best adhesion.  Gentle heating with a hair dryer can remove the moisture and so long as the surfaces remain warm you won't have any condensation.  Complete removal of the chainplate is preferrable but you should be able to restore the seal by just rebedding the offending bolts. I would clean up and inspect the bolts to be sure that you don't have any pitting or corrosion since salt water has been in there.  No need to worry about cleaning caulking from the threads, in fact I would leave it to help lock the nuts.  None of the caulkings are strong enough to prevent the removal of the nuts in the future. In the case of a chainplate adherred with 5200 to the gelcoat, you can also be temporarily weaken a polyurathene caulking like 5200 by carefully heating the metal to reduce or eliminate damage to the gelcoat.  Best of luck.

James Alton
SV Sueno
Maramu #220


-----Original Message-----
From: Ken Powers SV Aquarius <ken@...>
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Sent: Wed, Oct 14, 2020 2:30 am
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Genoa Chain Plate bolts Leaking in aft hanging closet

Hi Erik,

Here are some photos of the job at hand!  I talked with some local boaties here at Krabi Boat Lagoon, and they suggested 5200.  It has been raining for 5 days straight, and looks like it will continue for the next 6 days. I am thinking once it stops for a day or two, I will do the following.

1.  Remove 1 or 2 of the bolts.  Not to remove the entire chainplate.
2.  Clean hole and bolt with alcohol.
3.  Put good amount of 5200 into hole.
4. Replace bolt or bolts and try to get as much of the 5200 off the treads.  So that I don't glue the nut onto the bolt.
      I am told that this will not be a problem, any thoughts? 
5.  Repeat until finished with all the bolts.  Except, I am only planing to do the 4 bottom bolts under the rub rail, not the single bolt in the middle of the chainplate.  This bolt does not show signs of leaking, and even if it did, the leak should be at most, minor, due to the location.  Unlike the 4 bottom bolts which could submersed in water for extended periods of time.  And thoughts about this decision?
6. Glue interior back together.  Still wondering what adhesive to use to re-attach the interior lining.   It's like Humpty Dumpty, just hope I don't need all the Kings Horses, and all the Kings men.
7. Replace Rub Rail rubber piece.

Anyone have thoughts about my intended procedure?

Ken
Aquarius SM2K#262
In Krabi Boat Lagoon, Thailand


Ken Powers SV Aquarius
 

Thanks to all you Amelians for helping me through this mess!  I think I have a good procedure for the repair now.  But as aways, subject to change once I get into job.  It looks as though it should take all of 3 hours to complete this task, but as boat jobs go, I alway grossly underestimate time required 'til completion.

So, here is my revised plan of attack for this
1.  Remove 1 or 2 of the bolts.  Not to remove the entire chainplate.
2.  Clean hole and bolt with acetone.  
3.  Verify no damage or pitting to the bolts. 
4.  Tape off area that I don't want to be covered in 4200.
5.  Put good amount of 4200 into hole.  Use a small toothbrush or q-tip to make sure that 4200 is completely covering the walls of bolt hole.
6 . Replace bolts and nuts.
7.  Repeat (1 to 6)  until finished with all the bolts.  Except, I am only planing to do the 4 bottom bolts under the rub rail, not the single bolt in the middle of the chainplate.  This bolt does not show signs of leaking, and even if it did, the leak should be at most, minor, due to the location.  Unlike the 4 bottom bolts which could submersed in water for extended periods of time under the rub rail rubber. 
8. Glue interior back together.  Planing to use 3M Super 77 Spray Adhesive.  This part should be straightforward.
9. Replace Rub Rail rubber piece.  Using lots of soap and a bit of water!

If anyone has any suggestions, or reasons why I should change the process, let me know?

Thank you all!!

Ken
Aquarius SM2K#262
In Krabi Boat Lagoon, Thailand


Billy Newport
 

For reattaching the interior

https://www.3m.com/3M/en_US/company-us/all-3m-products/~/3M-Hi-Strength-90-Spray-Adhesive/?N=5002385+3293242219&rt=rud

Here is a video doing something similar on a nordhavn

https://youtu.be/6_U84YwUk5w

Skip to about 12 minutes


Ruslan Osmonov
 

Hi Ken, did you consider Butyl tape as a sealant? Many prefer it to seal hatches, it stays tacky for years and years and you can easily remove it if needed. 

Regards,
Ruslan. 
--


 

Ken,

You probably are aware of the fact that the copper pipe vent for the fuel tank is above the area where you have a leak, and this copper vent pipe will create more water than you may realize because of condensation. I bring this up because you are focussed on the chainplate on the starboard side/aft. 

In certain climate conditions, we experienced more condensation because of that copper fuel tank vent than we thought would happen, and we did not notice the cause until after we smelled mold.

Just a thought that I had that I am sure you are aware of.

Bill
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Tue, Oct 13, 2020 at 8:47 PM Ken Powers SV Aquarius <ken@...> wrote:

[Edited Message Follows]

Hello Paul,

Thanks for the response.  Are there nuts under the rub rail, because the bolt heads are in the closet?  Or, are the bolts threaded into the chainplate somehow?  Other questions...  There is also one bolt head holding the chainplate to the side of the boat for the outside.  This single bolt head is near the middle of the chain plate facing out.  Is this bolt treaded into a nut embedded in fiberglass, or will I have to find the nut on the inside of the boat.  I can't see at this time where the nut would be.  Also, anyone that has had the problem know the correct way to repair the leak?  I am worried about putting on a bunch of sealant on the stainless steel which may promote the stainless steel to corrode.

Thanks for the help.

Ken
Aquarius SM2K#262
Currently in Thailand


Jose Venegas
 

Ken, 
Perhaps something you already did but just in case, were you able to visualize water going through the bolt?  Now that you have it stripped down the rub rail you can put some water outside and make sure the leak is through the bolt and, if not visualize where it is actually coming from.

Jose 
Ipamena SM 278 


James Alton
 

Ken,

   Your plan should get you sealed back up.  I didn't mention my recommendations for a sealant since I assume that you have a limited selection to pick from.  The  5200 or 4200 will work for you.  If you however can find the Polyether caulking called Multicaulk, sold in the States by West Marine, this would be my top choice because it does not seem to break down and turn gooey like the Polyurathenes can over time.  Exposure to any kind of oil such as diesel is a problem for Polyurathenes and accelerates the softening.   The Multicaulk is a bit softer and more flexible than the Polyurathenes,  even the 4200. The softeness is a benefit in the bond of the sealant.    Exposure to oils can temporarily soften the Polyether but as the oil is washed away,  the polyether tends to return to it's original cured state.  I have had complete failures with 4200 (and 5200 would be no different) from painting over the caulking seams on a wooden hull with traditional oil paints.  Polyether caulking can be painted or vanished over without problems.  

Best of luck,

James
SV Sueno
Maramu #220


-----Original Message-----
From: Ken Powers SV Aquarius <ken@...>
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Sent: Wed, Oct 14, 2020 5:04 am
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Genoa Chain Plate bolts Leaking in aft hanging closet

Thanks to all you Amelians for helping me through this mess!  I think I have a good procedure for the repair now.  But as aways, subject to change once I get into job.  It looks as though it should take all of 3 hours to complete this task, but as boat jobs go, I alway grossly underestimate time required 'til completion.

So, here is my revised plan of attack for this
1.  Remove 1 or 2 of the bolts.  Not to remove the entire chainplate.
2.  Clean hole and bolt with acetone.  
3.  Verify no damage or pitting to the bolts. 
4.  Tape off area that I don't want to be covered in 4200.
5.  Put good amount of 4200 into hole.  Use a small toothbrush or q-tip to make sure that 4200 is completely covering the walls of bolt hole.
6 . Replace bolts and nuts.
7.  Repeat (1 to 6)  until finished with all the bolts.  Except, I am only planing to do the 4 bottom bolts under the rub rail, not the single bolt in the middle of the chainplate.  This bolt does not show signs of leaking, and even if it did, the leak should be at most, minor, due to the location.  Unlike the 4 bottom bolts which could submersed in water for extended periods of time under the rub rail rubber. 
8. Glue interior back together.  Planing to use 3M Super 77 Spray Adhesive.  This part should be straightforward.
9. Replace Rub Rail rubber piece.  Using lots of soap and a bit of water!

If anyone has any suggestions, or reasons why I should change the process, let me know?

Thank you all!!

Ken
Aquarius SM2K#262
In Krabi Boat Lagoon, Thailand


Ken Powers SV Aquarius
 

Hi Bill,

I knew the copper vent pipe for the fuel tank in the closet area, however, I didn't know about the potential condensation problem within the closet.  I will look a bit closer at the potential places where the water could come from, but I am pretty sure it is coming from at least one of the bolt holes on the bottom row of 4 bolts holding the Genoa chainplate.  Stick a few paper towels in various places and see which one gets wet.  

Next, I guess I need to do some research about Butyl tape.  See if that could be the silver bullet I've been looking for...

Ken
Aquarius
SM2K262 stuck in Thailand.


James Alton
 

Ken,

   I have worked on boats that used the butyl tape and use it myself for applications.  It is good stuff overall and I always carry some on the boat.  Works best it seems on mating parts that keep  pressure on the buytl.  If for instance you removed the chainplate and used the buytl tape between the chainplate and the fiberglass, the material would be pressed into the bolt holes and seal well.  You can also come back later and retighten the bolts if a new leak occurs and sometimes it will reseal, not so with caulk.  But I have not had the best luck sealing bolt holes alone with Butyl since the material does not want to stay on the bolt and fully fill the voids like caulking can.    So if I were just sealing the bolts I would go with a caulking. Best, James



-----Original Message-----
From: Ken Powers SV Aquarius <ken@...>
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Sent: Wed, Oct 14, 2020 11:50 am
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Genoa Chain Plate bolts Leaking in aft hanging closet

Hi Bill,

I knew the copper vent pipe for the fuel tank in the closet area, however, I didn't know about the potential condensation problem within the closet.  I will look a bit closer at the potential places where the water could come from, but I am pretty sure it is coming from at least one of the bolt holes on the bottom row of 4 bolts holding the Genoa chainplate.  Stick a few paper towels in various places and see which one gets wet.  

Next, I guess I need to do some research about Butyl tape.  See if that could be the silver bullet I've been looking for...

Ken
Aquarius
SM2K262 stuck in Thailand.


Ken Powers SV Aquarius
 

Hello James,

After several Amelians suggested the use of Butyl Tape, and after a bit of research on the subject....  I am going to use the Butyl Tape.  Though I am a bit worried about completely removing the chainplate.....

Ken