Topics

Heater and fuel bladder


eric freedman
 

Hi Jeff,

Do you have the forced air system on Spirit?

It sue was cold North of the stream this year wasn’t it?

 

If you recall we use the commercial Nauta fuel tank with the fittings installed. The cheaper 50+ gallon one is porous.

We originally filled the tank using the galley garbage can and a Jabsco vane puppy pump.

It is quite simple ,and uses one hose with absolutely no mess. We fill the tank from a full garbage can using the pump until we have exactly 50 gallons of fuel in the bladder. While filling we “burp” the tank by reversing the pump electrically and rock the tank to remove the air bubbles in the tank. The hose has a locking ball valve which we put a cable tie through (McMaster Carr) when the tank is full . We then wrap the valve in foam rubber. We then tighten the tie downs very tight. The tank stays in place and does not move an inch. The secret is not to empty the tank until you need all the fuel.

We then just hook a hose on to the valve and open it . It will drain all by itself into the fuel fill. We then lift up the tank upside down to get the last few drops out of the tank.

 

I had an epiphany last year. Being that I have permanent auxiliary fuel tanks in the port life raft locker. I just fill one and pump it directly into the tank, no more garbage can.

I also had installed a fuel filter and pump  in line with the fuel fill via a “y” valve (thanks Ian and Judy) .

We filter the fuel before it goes into the tank.

With this filter we use a 2 micron filter as our primary filter in the Racor filter instead of the 10 micron and the filter is always very clean.

 

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of JEFFREY KRAUS
Sent: Saturday, December 05, 2020 7:35 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] 3 topics Smart Regulator Hydronic diesel heater

 

Good Morning Amelians,
I hope this message finds everyone well and happy throughout the globe.
I'm looking to install a smart external regulator. 
I'm looking into 2 currently.
a. wakespeed 500   Another Amel owner has installed this unit with good results, and I'm awaiting more information on it and it's installation.
b. ZM5  I recently got a return email from the company (located in New Zealand). Information pending.
Has anyone had any experience with the ZM?

I'm looking to install a diesel heater aboard.
I'm giving serious consideration to a hydronic system. One aspect of a hydronic system is that it can heat the boat without the heater operating while the engine is running, with the engine coolant circulating and providing the heat to the fan units, If anyone has used a bus heater, that's how it works. Without the engine on, the diesel heater warms the coolant in the lines. The engine, heater, AND the hot water system are in series, so one has the luxury of heating your hot water while the diesel heater is running also.
The particular system I'm focusing on is a Webasto 2010s.
It can have up to 4 fan/zones. I would install 1 in the main cabin, 1 in forward cabin, 1 in masters cabin, and 1 at the helm. The luxury of a heated helm  (within the enclosure ) would be nice. These bus heaters produce heat at a very high rate.
Has anyone had any experience with this, or for that matter any hydronic system aboard their vessel?

I recently ran Spirit back from Puerto Rico to NY on a solo run of what turned out to be 1600nm.
Before leaving, I strapped a fuel bladder (50gal) on top of the stern cabin. I bought 2 pipes each with a shut off valve. 1 a fill (larger to accommodate the fuel nozzle), 1 an outflow with a fitting to attach a hose to run into the fuel tank. I used a clear hose so I could see the fuel flowing. Once I knew I had used up more than 50 gal of fuel, I ran the hose into the tank, and while applying pressure to the bladder with my knee, opened the outflow valve, and the fuel siphoned into the tank, sucking all the fuel out of the bladder. It worked like a charm. I took off the pipes, and replaced the bladder caps, rolled the bladder up. and that was that. If anyone is interested in the bladder hookup and type, let me know.

Thanks in advance for any feedback on the 2 other issues.
Jeff Spirit Amel 54 #14
back in Shinnecock NY


JEFFREY KRAUS
 

Eric,
I'm not sure what you mean about a forced air system.
It was cold north of the gulf stream. I had a small propane heater for the trip. It worked but it was a temporary solution. 
That bladder looks like the same one I have. I got it from Roberto.
Best Regards,
Jeff 
Spirit Amel 54 #14 
Shinnecock, NY


eric freedman
 

Hi Jeff,

Kimberlite came with a couple of blowers mounted under the port coming in my port locker.

I was hooked to ductwork to blow fresh air into the aft cabin, the main cabin , and the forward cabin.

It was very easy to hook an Espar heater into this system as the ductwork was in place. I don’t know if the 54 was supplied with this option.

If you do not have these ducts, then I agree that hot water with blowers is the way to go.

 

I think you will find pumping the fuel into the tank a lot easier than using fuel nozzle. You also do not get air into the bladder.

In the interim If you turn on the stove and open the companionway a crack it heats up the main cabin nicely.

Some old timers used to use red clay flower pots over the burners to act as radiators.

 

I am off to Kimberlite on the 12th and will return on the 21st

Dinner?

Fair Winds

Eric

 

 

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of JEFFREY KRAUS
Sent: Sunday, December 06, 2020 6:40 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Heater and fuel bladder

 

Eric,
I'm not sure what you mean about a forced air system.
It was cold north of the gulf stream. I had a small propane heater for the trip. It worked but it was a temporary solution. 
That bladder looks like the same one I have. I got it from Roberto.
Best Regards,
Jeff 
Spirit Amel 54 #14 
Shinnecock, NY


JEFFREY KRAUS
 

Eric,
I'll look to see if I have those blowers, but I don't believe I have them.
The luxury of linking the heater with the engine and hot water circuits, along with the option of a cockpit heating unit seem to make the hydronic system a great option. 
As far as pumping fuel from the bladder, it doesn't get any easier then a siphon system. 
I'm free thru wednesday. I'm making a scallop trip friday, and we leave 2am. How's Wednesday nite for dinner? Roberto, Charles, Jeff G.? Anyone else?
Jeff


Peter Luke
 

Eric,

How wise it it to burn propane in an enclosed space albeit with a slightly open companionway?

Propane undergoes combustion reactions in a similar fashion to other alkanes. In the presence of excess oxygen, propane burns to form water and carbon dioxide.
C 3 H 8 + 5 O 2 ⟶ 3 CO 2 + 4 H 2 O + heat 

When insufficient oxygen is present for complete combustion, carbon monoxide and/or soot (carbon) are formed as well:
2 C 3 H 8 + 9 O 2 ⟶ 4 CO 2 + 2 CO + 8 H 2 O + heat

C 3 H 8 + 2 O 2 ⟶ 3 C + 4 H 2 O + heat

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Propane#Properties_and_reactions

Does your CO2 or CO alarm sound off?

Appears that CO2 and H2O are byproducts - condensation & suffocating gas.

Regards,

Peter

On 7/12/2020 11:13 am, eric freedman wrote:

Hi Jeff,

Kimberlite came with a couple of blowers mounted under the port coming in my port locker.

I was hooked to ductwork to blow fresh air into the aft cabin, the main cabin , and the forward cabin.

It was very easy to hook an Espar heater into this system as the ductwork was in place. I don’t know if the 54 was supplied with this option.

If you do not have these ducts, then I agree that hot water with blowers is the way to go.

 

I think you will find pumping the fuel into the tank a lot easier than using fuel nozzle. You also do not get air into the bladder.

In the interim If you turn on the stove and open the companionway a crack it heats up the main cabin nicely.

Some old timers used to use red clay flower pots over the burners to act as radiators.

 

I am off to Kimberlite on the 12th and will return on the 21st

Dinner?

Fair Winds

Eric

 

 

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of JEFFREY KRAUS
Sent: Sunday, December 06, 2020 6:40 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Heater and fuel bladder

 

Eric,
I'm not sure what you mean about a forced air system.
It was cold north of the gulf stream. I had a small propane heater for the trip. It worked but it was a temporary solution. 
That bladder looks like the same one I have. I got it from Roberto.
Best Regards,
Jeff 
Spirit Amel 54 #14 
Shinnecock, NY


eric freedman
 

Jeff,

I meant to use a pump to fill the tank.

To empty the tank I just stick the hose in the fuel fill and open the valve.

Wednesday sounds good for dinner.

I am heading South Saturday.

Fair Winds

Eric

 

You would know if you had the fresh air system as there is a separate circuit breaker for it.

 

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of JEFFREY KRAUS
Sent: Monday, December 07, 2020 7:39 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Heater and fuel bladder

 

Eric,
I'll look to see if I have those blowers, but I don't believe I have them.
The luxury of linking the heater with the engine and hot water circuits, along with the option of a cockpit heating unit seem to make the hydronic system a great option. 
As far as pumping fuel from the bladder, it doesn't get any easier then a siphon system. 
I'm free thru wednesday. I'm making a scallop trip friday, and we leave 2am. How's Wednesday nite for dinner? Roberto, Charles, Jeff G.? Anyone else?
Jeff


eric freedman
 

Peter,

I used the stove. The same one we cook on.  I seemed to have survived the use as a heater as I ran it for 1 ½ days

years ago before installing the Espar Heater.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Peter Luke via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, December 06, 2020 7:41 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Heater and fuel bladder

 

Eric,

How wise it it to burn propane in an enclosed space albeit with a slightly open companionway?

Propane undergoes combustion reactions in a similar fashion to other alkanes. In the presence of excess oxygen, propane burns to form water and carbon dioxide.
C 3 H 8 + 5 O 2
3 CO 2 + 4 H 2 O + heat 

When insufficient oxygen is present for complete combustion, carbon monoxide and/or soot (carbon) are formed as well:
2 C 3 H 8 + 9 O 2
4 CO 2 + 2 CO + 8 H 2 O + heat

C 3 H 8 + 2 O 2 3 C + 4 H 2 O + heat

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Propane#Properties_and_reactions

Does your CO2 or CO alarm sound off?

Appears that CO2 and H2O are byproducts - condensation & suffocating gas.

Regards,

Peter

On 7/12/2020 11:13 am, eric freedman wrote:

Hi Jeff,

Kimberlite came with a couple of blowers mounted under the port coming in my port locker.

I was hooked to ductwork to blow fresh air into the aft cabin, the main cabin , and the forward cabin.

It was very easy to hook an Espar heater into this system as the ductwork was in place. I don’t know if the 54 was supplied with this option.

If you do not have these ducts, then I agree that hot water with blowers is the way to go.

 

I think you will find pumping the fuel into the tank a lot easier than using fuel nozzle. You also do not get air into the bladder.

In the interim If you turn on the stove and open the companionway a crack it heats up the main cabin nicely.

Some old timers used to use red clay flower pots over the burners to act as radiators.

 

I am off to Kimberlite on the 12th and will return on the 21st

Dinner?

Fair Winds

Eric

 

 

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of JEFFREY KRAUS
Sent: Sunday, December 06, 2020 6:40 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Heater and fuel bladder

 

Eric,
I'm not sure what you mean about a forced air system.
It was cold north of the gulf stream. I had a small propane heater for the trip. It worked but it was a temporary solution. 
That bladder looks like the same one I have. I got it from Roberto.
Best Regards,
Jeff 
Spirit Amel 54 #14 
Shinnecock, NY


Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

There was a very sad case in New Zealand a few years back. It was four guys out on a mountain hunting trip. One night they were in a mountain hut and it was very cold so they brought the gas barbecue inside and left it running all night. In the morning three were dead and the survivor had his nose close to the gap under the door. Carbon monoxide is the killer I believe, odorless and the effects are insidious.

In the past on a previous boat I used the gas stove to warm us at 2 am after a race, but not any more

Regards

Danny

SM 299 Ocean Pearl  

On 08 December 2020 at 07:14 eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:

Peter,

I used the stove. The same one we cook on.  I seemed to have survived the use as a heater as I ran it for 1 ½ days

years ago before installing the Espar Heater.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Peter Luke via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, December 06, 2020 7:41 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Heater and fuel bladder

 

Eric,

How wise it it to burn propane in an enclosed space albeit with a slightly open companionway?

Propane undergoes combustion reactions in a similar fashion to other alkanes. In the presence of excess oxygen, propane burns to form water and carbon dioxide.
C 3 H 8 + 5 O 2
3 CO 2 + 4 H 2 O + heat 

When insufficient oxygen is present for complete combustion, carbon monoxide and/or soot (carbon) are formed as well:
2 C 3 H 8 + 9 O 2
4 CO 2 + 2 CO + 8 H 2 O + heat

C 3 H 8 + 2 O 2 3 C + 4 H 2 O + heat

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Propane#Properties_and_reactions

Does your CO2 or CO alarm sound off?

Appears that CO2 and H2O are byproducts - condensation & suffocating gas.

Regards,

Peter

On 7/12/2020 11:13 am, eric freedman wrote:

Hi Jeff,

Kimberlite came with a couple of blowers mounted under the port coming in my port locker.

I was hooked to ductwork to blow fresh air into the aft cabin, the main cabin , and the forward cabin.

It was very easy to hook an Espar heater into this system as the ductwork was in place. I don’t know if the 54 was supplied with this option.

If you do not have these ducts, then I agree that hot water with blowers is the way to go.

 

I think you will find pumping the fuel into the tank a lot easier than using fuel nozzle. You also do not get air into the bladder.

In the interim If you turn on the stove and open the companionway a crack it heats up the main cabin nicely.

Some old timers used to use red clay flower pots over the burners to act as radiators.

 

I am off to Kimberlite on the 12th and will return on the 21st

Dinner?

Fair Winds

Eric

 

 

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of JEFFREY KRAUS
Sent: Sunday, December 06, 2020 6:40 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Heater and fuel bladder

 

Eric,
I'm not sure what you mean about a forced air system.
It was cold north of the gulf stream. I had a small propane heater for the trip. It worked but it was a temporary solution. 
That bladder looks like the same one I have. I got it from Roberto.
Best Regards,
Jeff 
Spirit Amel 54 #14 
Shinnecock, NY

 



 


 


Martin Birkhoff
 

Unfortunately I can add a similar accident. 6 years ago the heating system in the house of one of my cousins had been broken down. For some odd reasons he refused to ask for a repair. It was winter and he wanted to take a bath so he brought a charcoal barbecue into the bathroom, enlightetd the fire, closed all windows and doors as tight as he could and stepped into the bathtub. You can imagine the result, only his dog survived because it was in the living room.

Martin

Mago del Sur - 54#40  


Matt Salatino
 

There are indoor propane heaters. I believe they recommend leaving a window cracked 

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Dec 7, 2020, at 3:00 PM, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@...> wrote:

There was a very sad case in New Zealand a few years back. It was four guys out on a mountain hunting trip. One night they were in a mountain hut and it was very cold so they brought the gas barbecue inside and left it running all night. In the morning three were dead and the survivor had his nose close to the gap under the door. Carbon monoxide is the killer I believe, odorless and the effects are insidious.

In the past on a previous boat I used the gas stove to warm us at 2 am after a race, but not any more

Regards

Danny

SM 299 Ocean Pearl  

On 08 December 2020 at 07:14 eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:

Peter,

I used the stove. The same one we cook on.  I seemed to have survived the use as a heater as I ran it for 1 ½ days

years ago before installing the Espar Heater.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Peter Luke via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, December 06, 2020 7:41 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Heater and fuel bladder

 

Eric,

How wise it it to burn propane in an enclosed space albeit with a slightly open companionway?

Propane undergoes combustion reactions in a similar fashion to other alkanes. In the presence of excess oxygen, propane burns to form water and carbon dioxide.
C 3 H 8 + 5 O 2
3 CO 2 + 4 H 2 O + heat 

When insufficient oxygen is present for complete combustion, carbon monoxide and/or soot (carbon) are formed as well:
2 C 3 H 8 + 9 O 2
4 CO 2 + 2 CO + 8 H 2 O + heat

C 3 H 8 + 2 O 2 3 C + 4 H 2 O + heat

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Propane#Properties_and_reactions

Does your CO2 or CO alarm sound off?

Appears that CO2 and H2O are byproducts - condensation & suffocating gas.

Regards,

Peter

On 7/12/2020 11:13 am, eric freedman wrote:

Hi Jeff,

Kimberlite came with a couple of blowers mounted under the port coming in my port locker.

I was hooked to ductwork to blow fresh air into the aft cabin, the main cabin , and the forward cabin.

It was very easy to hook an Espar heater into this system as the ductwork was in place. I don’t know if the 54 was supplied with this option.

If you do not have these ducts, then I agree that hot water with blowers is the way to go.

 

I think you will find pumping the fuel into the tank a lot easier than using fuel nozzle. You also do not get air into the bladder.

In the interim If you turn on the stove and open the companionway a crack it heats up the main cabin nicely.

Some old timers used to use red clay flower pots over the burners to act as radiators.

 

I am off to Kimberlite on the 12th and will return on the 21st

Dinner?

Fair Winds

Eric

 

 

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of JEFFREY KRAUS
Sent: Sunday, December 06, 2020 6:40 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Heater and fuel bladder

 

Eric,
I'm not sure what you mean about a forced air system.
It was cold north of the gulf stream. I had a small propane heater for the trip. It worked but it was a temporary solution. 
That bladder looks like the same one I have. I got it from Roberto.
Best Regards,
Jeff 
Spirit Amel 54 #14 
Shinnecock, NY

 



 


 


Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Yes there are but increasingly they are being recognized as being dangerous. In older homes that were less airtight, not as bad. But in the modern home with the modern attitude of shut everything up, very dangerous. It is all about volume. In a home with the internal doors open there is a reasonable volume. One room with doors and windows tight shut, very different.

Take care good friends.

Danny

SM 299 Ocean Pearl

On 08 December 2020 at 09:49 "Matt Salatino via groups.io" <helmsmatt@...> wrote:

There are indoor propane heaters. I believe they recommend leaving a window cracked 

~~~ ⛵️~~~ Matt

On Dec 7, 2020, at 3:00 PM, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS < simms@...> wrote:

There was a very sad case in New Zealand a few years back. It was four guys out on a mountain hunting trip. One night they were in a mountain hut and it was very cold so they brought the gas barbecue inside and left it running all night. In the morning three were dead and the survivor had his nose close to the gap under the door. Carbon monoxide is the killer I believe, odorless and the effects are insidious.

In the past on a previous boat I used the gas stove to warm us at 2 am after a race, but not any more

Regards

Danny

SM 299 Ocean Pearl  

On 08 December 2020 at 07:14 eric freedman < kimberlite@...> wrote:

Peter,

I used the stove. The same one we cook on.  I seemed to have survived the use as a heater as I ran it for 1 ½ days

years ago before installing the Espar Heater.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Peter Luke via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, December 06, 2020 7:41 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Heater and fuel bladder

 

Eric,

How wise it it to burn propane in an enclosed space albeit with a slightly open companionway?

Propane undergoes combustion reactions in a similar fashion to other alkanes. In the presence of excess oxygen, propane burns to form water and carbon dioxide.
C 3 H 8 + 5 O 2
3 CO 2 + 4 H 2 O + heat 

When insufficient oxygen is present for complete combustion, carbon monoxide and/or soot (carbon) are formed as well:
2 C 3 H 8 + 9 O 2
4 CO 2 + 2 CO + 8 H 2 O + heat

C 3 H 8 + 2 O 2 3 C + 4 H 2 O + heat

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Propane#Properties_and_reactions

Does your CO2 or CO alarm sound off?

Appears that CO2 and H2O are byproducts - condensation & suffocating gas.

Regards,

Peter

On 7/12/2020 11:13 am, eric freedman wrote:

Hi Jeff,

Kimberlite came with a couple of blowers mounted under the port coming in my port locker.

I was hooked to ductwork to blow fresh air into the aft cabin, the main cabin , and the forward cabin.

It was very easy to hook an Espar heater into this system as the ductwork was in place. I don’t know if the 54 was supplied with this option.

If you do not have these ducts, then I agree that hot water with blowers is the way to go.

 

I think you will find pumping the fuel into the tank a lot easier than using fuel nozzle. You also do not get air into the bladder.

In the interim If you turn on the stove and open the companionway a crack it heats up the main cabin nicely.

Some old timers used to use red clay flower pots over the burners to act as radiators.

 

I am off to Kimberlite on the 12th and will return on the 21st

Dinner?

Fair Winds

Eric

 

 

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of JEFFREY KRAUS
Sent: Sunday, December 06, 2020 6:40 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Heater and fuel bladder

 

Eric,
I'm not sure what you mean about a forced air system.
It was cold north of the gulf stream. I had a small propane heater for the trip. It worked but it was a temporary solution. 
That bladder looks like the same one I have. I got it from Roberto.
Best Regards,
Jeff 
Spirit Amel 54 #14 
Shinnecock, NY

 



 


 


 


 


JEFFREY KRAUS
 

Just a quick note regarding my use of the propane heater.
It wasn't left on for an extended period of time, I only had the screw on little canister, so it was used sparingly. It was brought for just such emergency use.
Unfortunately, the propane switch in the propane locker had failed, so the stove wasn't an option.
Perhaps we shouldn't use the stove aboard either, considering it too runs on propane.
Making the solo run, and north of the gulf stream within 75 miles of the coast, boat and ship traffic is very active, and it gets cold at night. It was November.  From the entrance of Delaware Bay , north across the Fairways leading into NY harbor it was extremely active. I made that crossing at night. There were a bunch of draggers working the "mud hole", which is just off the harbor entrance, complicating the crossing. They haul back, turn, and go the other way indiscriminantly. Ask me how I know that. If you think I was down below long enough to drop dead of carbon monoxide poisoning you are mistaken. I was lucky to come down and light the stove and warm up for an hour.

Jeff 
Spirit Amel 54 #14


JB Duler
 

Please, please don't play with propane!!!!
Up in the California Sierras where we have our winter cabin, every
year we get one or two people who die in their van from bad stoves.
The typical story is that the snow is blowing, sometimes blocking the
exhaust or pushing bad air under the door where it finds its way
inside (because in this case the doors are not sealed well or there
are holes for wires in the chassis).
In our van we installed a very simple regular Airtronic D2 made by the
German company espar. We bought it online with heatso in the UK. The
Sprinter has something set up to get your fuel supply directly into
our diesel tank. You can do the same thing directly from the diesel
line next to the Raccor filters. Fresh air in (inlet in the cockpit in
a sheltered place), warm air out and exhaust away from that (outside
the hull). It is super efficient, powerful, takes hours to install,
and can easily heat the whole boat. If you want to heat the driver
area, super easy, you add a Y connector and a duct. Very, very
powerful.
If you are a solo navigator, just put the controls near the wheel.
At 2.200 m altitude we go from 20F to 75F in 15 minutes.
Even if you don't die, bad fumes will cause nausea and headaches (I am
not an MD).
Cheers,

On Tue, Dec 8, 2020 at 3:42 AM JEFFREY KRAUS <jmkraus@optonline.net> wrote:

Just a quick note regarding my use of the propane heater.
It wasn't left on for an extended period of time, I only had the screw on little canister, so it was used sparingly. It was brought for just such emergency use.
Unfortunately, the propane switch in the propane locker had failed, so the stove wasn't an option.
Perhaps we shouldn't use the stove aboard either, considering it too runs on propane.
Making the solo run, and north of the gulf stream within 75 miles of the coast, boat and ship traffic is very active, and it gets cold at night. It was November. From the entrance of Delaware Bay , north across the Fairways leading into NY harbor it was extremely active. I made that crossing at night. There were a bunch of draggers working the "mud hole", which is just off the harbor entrance, complicating the crossing. They haul back, turn, and go the other way indiscriminantly. Ask me how I know that. If you think I was down below long enough to drop dead of carbon monoxide poisoning you are mistaken. I was lucky to come down and light the stove and warm up for an hour.

Jeff
Spirit Amel 54 #14


--
John-Bernard Duler
--
John Bernard "JB" Duler
San Francisco
Meltem # 19, Western Med


eric freedman
 

Hi Jeff,

At the mud hole and at the edge of the canyon we always run into the draggers. I call their moves a crazy Ivan like in the Russian subs. The long lines are also something to look out for. One time I came across a line of high flyers and they lined up exactly with the rings on my radar. Quite a coincidence.

Fair Winds

Eric

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of JEFFREY KRAUS
Sent: Tuesday, December 08, 2020 6:43 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Heater and fuel bladder

 

Just a quick note regarding my use of the propane heater.
It wasn't left on for an extended period of time, I only had the screw on little canister, so it was used sparingly. It was brought for just such emergency use.
Unfortunately, the propane switch in the propane locker had failed, so the stove wasn't an option.
Perhaps we shouldn't use the stove aboard either, considering it too runs on propane.
Making the solo run, and north of the gulf stream within 75 miles of the coast, boat and ship traffic is very active, and it gets cold at night. It was November.  From the entrance of Delaware Bay , north across the Fairways leading into NY harbor it was extremely active. I made that crossing at night. There were a bunch of draggers working the "mud hole", which is just off the harbor entrance, complicating the crossing. They haul back, turn, and go the other way indiscriminantly. Ask me how I know that. If you think I was down below long enough to drop dead of carbon monoxide poisoning you are mistaken. I was lucky to come down and light the stove and warm up for an hour.

Jeff 
Spirit Amel 54 #14