Topics

Maramu 1984 - Genoa - Original sailpan overlap

James Lochhead
 

Hello,

Does anyone know the %overlap on the original sailplan for the Maramu.  Ours is hull number #147 year 1984.

James

Bill Fletcher
 

My MARAMU sn 179 has a 150 headsail that was copied from the original. I am currently sailing South Pacfic and I am thinking of replacing it with a 130. The reason any wind over 15 knots it needs to be reefed to 130 or 100 And the boat preforms better.  My two cents. 
Bill Fletcher 
SN 179


On Nov 3, 2019, at 1:18 AM, James Lochhead <j_lochhead@...> wrote:

Hello,

Does anyone know the %overlap on the original sailplan for the Maramu.  Ours is hull number #147 year 1984.

James

Karen Smith
 

James,

You might want to contact Dave Benjamin of Island Planet Sails.  He is a former Maramu owner, and is well familiar with the various Amel sails and how the originals fit the boat.  

Because of the unique features of the Amel, in general if you have someone asking you what size jib you want, you can be pretty sure they don't really know what the boat should have or how it should work. This is especially true of boats that use the Amel downwind rig.  You can't vary your sail size and have it work well.

Ian
 

James
I replaced my 150% Genoa with a 130% in Trinidad.
Coming back across the Atlantic to UK the difference in size with the ballooner and poles set the difference in size was noticeable visually, but didn't affect downwind performance or boat balance.
I have thought that if/when I plan another ocean passage I would get another ballooner made to fit the Genoa track. Two lightweight sails make a lot of sense and would certainly be easier to store than a Genoa. I would just drop my 130 onto the deck and lash it to the rail. Easy enough in light downwind conditions.
The 130% performs much better here in UK weather conditions even when it's furled (with foam luff).

Ian

Ocean Hobo SN96

James Lochhead
 

Thanks Karen.  I have reached out to Dave.
--

James
Maramu #147 (1984)

James Lochhead
 

Thanks.  150 does seem like alot.  I am not sure exactly the % lap on our current Genoa however the previous owner advised that when he replaced it he got it made smaller.  He said in hindsight that was a mistake.

We have been sailing a lot in SE Asia and could definitely made use of a larger Genoa at times.
--

James
Maramu #147 (1984)

smiles bernard
 

Hi there

Ours genoa 150% or perhaps even 160% when we purchased the boat

We reduced it to 135 with a new sail and that seemed like a good compromise to us and got us around the North Atlantic very well. 

We pull  the big old one out of retirement for the downwind trade winds passage East to West but at all other times used the 135%

If you go this route .... its well worth checking the smaller sail's clew is cut so it can still be poled out and reefed whilst poled etc 

Ours was cut high which worked well fo the poles but just too high so that I can’t reach the leech line or clew without gymnastics - also worth considering imo

As a related aside......my next trip ... (if it happens!) .... for downwind work we will use the 135% and have a dedicated 110ish% strong sail piston hanked onto a removable forestay for pole plus pole downwind work with double headsails

Ive done this before and tried other things like cruising chutes and small spinnakers but for simplicity it cant be beaten in my humble opinion. 

The main genoa on the furler as the throttle and the smaller bullet proof one hanked on and up for the whole passage (unless it gets seriously windy). 

I appreciate that SM have the choice of the double headsails up the same foil and the means to release this which looks pretty awesome so probably more of a consideration for vintage Maramu folk

All the best and happy sailing 

Miles

Maramu 162 1986

 

I'll add some more opinion to the Genoa size discussion.

I don't understand the advantage of changing the geometry of the Genoa, when considering that Amel SMs were designed primarily as downwind passage makers with the option of setting furling twin headsails and poles. Changing the size of the furling Genoa doesn't make sense to me, but changing it without changing its twin (ballooner) really doesn't make sense. 

The SM Genoa is the most powerful of all the SM sails. It has a bullet-proof furler which will routinely last 20 years without service or even greasing. All of the SM sails, as designed, allow for balanced sailing.  I would like to understand the benefit of reducing the Genoa's designed potential power.

And, more importantly, when owners speak of modifying an Amel design, you know that I am the one raising the Amel flag. 


--
CW Bill Rouse Amel Yacht Owners School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
   

On Mon, Nov 4, 2019, 3:17 AM smiles bernard via Groups.Io <smilesbernard=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi there

Ours genoa 150% or perhaps even 160% when we purchased the boat

We reduced it to 135 with a new sail and that seemed like a good compromise to us and got us around the North Atlantic very well. 

We pull  the big old one out of retirement for the downwind trade winds passage East to West but at all other times used the 135%

If you go this route .... its well worth checking the smaller sail's clew is cut so it can still be poled out and reefed whilst poled etc 

Ours was cut high which worked well fo the poles but just too high so that I can’t reach the leech line or clew without gymnastics - also worth considering imo

As a related aside......my next trip ... (if it happens!) .... for downwind work we will use the 135% and have a dedicated 110ish% strong sail piston hanked onto a removable forestay for pole plus pole downwind work with double headsails

Ive done this before and tried other things like cruising chutes and small spinnakers but for simplicity it cant be beaten in my humble opinion. 

The main genoa on the furler as the throttle and the smaller bullet proof one hanked on and up for the whole passage (unless it gets seriously windy). 

I appreciate that SM have the choice of the double headsails up the same foil and the means to release this which looks pretty awesome so probably more of a consideration for vintage Maramu folk

All the best and happy sailing 

Miles

Maramu 162 1986

smiles bernard
 

Hi Bill 

The SM rig looks really interesting 

I  think there is perhaps a couple of difference btwn Maramu and Super M in this instance though

My Maramu might be typical of others of the same vintage in that it does not have the original furler with the 3 track luff with the ability to use a mouse to release the ballooner. As such, i'll never fly the ballooner and genoa on the same furler as they cant be taken up / down independently. So to me the ballooner has only been used as a cruising chute - flown solo in light airs & without the genoa - ie not very often ! 

Also my Maramu does not have powered cockpit sheet winches - I've been really happy with the slightly smaller cut genoa as it makes winch work easier and better sail shape upwind but again some of the SM I have seem have nice  (aftermarket?) staysails which perhaps help in this department too


All the best
Miles