Raising Boot Stripe


Elaine Leishman
 

We have just hauled out and looking at raising the boot stripe on our Super Maramu.  Does anyone in the group have photos showing their raised boot stripe.  Thanks, Elaine and Michael from Nebo SM2000 251.


 

SM Boot Stripe Change.jpg


On Sun, Jan 16, 2022 at 3:39 PM Elaine Leishman via groups.io <leishman.elaine=yahoo.com.au@groups.io> wrote:
We have just hauled out and looking at raising the boot stripe on our Super Maramu.  Does anyone in the group have photos showing their raised boot stripe.  Thanks, Elaine and Michael from Nebo SM2000 251.


Mark Erdos
 

We raised our anti-fowling to the top of the original orange stripe and then painted an Awlgrip red stripe. For us, this has worked perfectly.

 

 

 

 

DSCN3289.JPG

 

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Elaine Leishman via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, January 16, 2022 11:40 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Raising Boot Stripe

 

We have just hauled out and looking at raising the boot stripe on our Super Maramu.  Does anyone in the group have photos showing their raised boot stripe.  Thanks, Elaine and Michael from Nebo SM2000 251.


Mike Longcor (SV Trilogy)
 

I agree with Mark. We raised the antifoul to top of original boot stripe but didn't add another stripe (yet). Considering doing that but would recommend doing as Mark did, no white gap between. Just doesn't stay white. Perhaps it would if it's higher up like in Bill's graphic. Anyway, it was fast and easy to do that way.

Cheers,
Mike Longcor
SV Trilogy SM23
NZ


On Mon, Jan 17, 2022, 2:30 PM Mark Erdos <mcerdos@...> wrote:

We raised our anti-fowling to the top of the original orange stripe and then painted an Awlgrip red stripe. For us, this has worked perfectly.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Elaine Leishman via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, January 16, 2022 11:40 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Raising Boot Stripe

 

We have just hauled out and looking at raising the boot stripe on our Super Maramu.  Does anyone in the group have photos showing their raised boot stripe.  Thanks, Elaine and Michael from Nebo SM2000 251.


David Vogel
 

Greetings,

We hauled out just before Christmas, and decided to raise the waterline to the top of the red stripe, which was getting pretty orange. We decided not re-do the red stripe at this stage – further on this later. In addition to avoiding scheduling issues with the painter, leading to possible overruns into Christmas New Year, this was also to avoid the unresolved issue (of decision-agreement) of re-aligning the waterline to be ‘level’ – what is level????

So we are still looking a little ‘nose up’. As an aside, this aligns with the autopilot pitch-sensor indicating 4.3º nose up; however, a spirit-level on the saloon table shows exactly horizontal in the fore-aft / pitch. We are in the process of ‘lightening the load’ and removing various paraphernalia from the bow lockers and aft lazarette, we expect further alteration to the ‘as seen’ waterline over coming months. Hence is why it seemed inadvisable to go to the extra trouble, time and expense of trying to re-level the waterline to an arbitrary reference, one that is only going to change again in the near term.

Regarding adding the red stripe again – we are considering updating the colour palette to the A55 (or similar), at which time we will do the crush-box at the gunwale to be complimentary. We are considering that we will use a vinyl stripe immediately above the waterline, much the same as boats that get ‘wrapped’, in preference to painting the stripe on.

At the moment, our antifouling is sitting well clear and above the waterline, and we are looking forward to the reduction in effort required to keep the lowest few cm of white gel-coat and the red-stripe looking as it should.

Best,

David
SM#396, Perigee
Whangarei, NZ


From: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of "Elaine Leishman via groups.io" <leishman.elaine=yahoo.com.au@groups.io>
Reply-To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Date: Monday, 17 January 2022 at 10:39 am
To: <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Raising Boot Stripe

We have just hauled out and looking at raising the boot stripe on our Super Maramu.  Does anyone in the group have photos showing their raised boot stripe.  Thanks, Elaine and Michael from Nebo SM2000 251.


william reynolds
 

We raised the stripe with a laser line,added a new white stripe and used Epifanes 2 part red paint for a new stripe. No more scrubbing under the stern.
Bill
Cloudstreet


Jose Venegas
 

After a new coopercoat work We too raised the stripe following Bill’s directions.
We have also been very happy with the looks and the lack of scrubbing



jose venegas
Ipanema SM2k 278
Bocas del toro Panamá


Elaine Leishman
 

Thanks everyone for the info and photos.  
Elaine and Michael from Nebo 


On Tue, 18 Jan. 2022 at 1:57 am, Jose Venegas via groups.io
<josegvenegas@...> wrote:
After a new coopercoat work We too raised the stripe following Bill’s directions.
We have also been very happy with the looks and the lack of scrubbing



jose venegas
Ipanema SM2k 278
Bocas del toro  Panamá






Alan "Woody" Wood
 

Hi Elaine and Michael
We raised the boot line on Mothership and did a maintenance blog on how we did it. Hope it helps - https://youtu.be/8QEAIdavdLU


Alan Leslie
 

We raised our waterline in 2017, and as others have said, we're a bit bow up, BUT no more scrubbing under the stern!
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Olivier Beaute
 

Hello everybody!

I don't like to do this but I think it's time for me to spoil the party. I will try to be straight forward.

Raising the waterline is not a very good idea, although I understand why some of you do it: the aft part of the hull's topsides gets fouled, on the white or red line area. It is only the consequence of the crew loading the vessel too much, or too much aft.
If you raise that line, you will probably load your boat even more. This is not good. Not only for the boat speed (motoring or sailing) but also because it changes the original design, especially about the standing rigging.
How is a standing rigging designed on a sailing boat? It is mainly designed according to the boat's displacement (weight).
If you load your boat too much, the forces that the standing rigging will face (especially in bad weather and the boat is pounding in the waves) will be much more than what it is designed for.

When surveying boats, I sometimes see too much additional equipment or stuff.
On a Super Maramu (I choose this example as it is most represented on this forum) I sometimes see:
-davits or stainless steel arches with solar panels (400 to 600W), one or two wind generators
-diving tank compressor with 2, 3 or 4 (or more...) tanks
-additional fuel tanks and jerrycans
-additional bilge pumps
-big fuel polishing systems
-two dinghies with two outboard engines (one big, one small)
-lots of spare parts (but also lots of old used parts that have not been discarded)
-fully stuffed book shelves
-additional hard dodgers
-staysail with furler
-3 or 4 anchors and tackle
-too many old mooring lines, or old running rigging that was not discarded when replaced
-two RADAR aerials

The first Super Maramus were designed with 5 100Ah batteries, a 80hp engine, a two cylinder 4kW generator, optionnal A/C, 60 liter 24V water-maker, small washing machine, no davits, no arches.
The recommended load of the equipment and crew was 2500 kg (not including fuel and water).
The last Super Maramus, with their 13 batteries, bigger generator and engine, bigger bow fitting, standard 3 A/Cs (sometimes 4, ask Joel...), 100 or 150 liter water-maker,
etc, allowed only 2000 kg.
With these loads, the original waterline was good.
If on your SM, the waterline is not good anymore, this simply means that it is overloaded, which can be sometimes dangerous.

Conclusion:
Before thinking of raising your waterline, try to estimate the weight of the additional equipment that is on board. The best way is to empty your boat from all the non-fixed equipments. You'll be surprised of the amount of material that you will put on the dock!
Then, try to estimate the weight of the fixed equipments (arches, solar panels, diving compressor, extra pumps and fuel systems).
If you find it above 2000 kg (for the SM2000), then you should discard some of these items (books are very heavy and damaged alternators or 10 sets of zincs-I swear I sometimes see this- are not necessary).
You can also decide to sail with only half the water tank if you have a good water-maker, which will give you 500 kg possibility.
Also don't forget to balance your load. On a SM2000, the additional standard equipments are located rather aft (engine, generator, batteries, etc..). So, don't forget to load the front cabin (what I usually see, strangely, is that the front cabin is very empty, compared to the cockpit and aft deck lockers).

Keeping your boat light will make you happy (and faster).

Olivier.




 

Olivier,

Thanks! I am really glad that you said this! It needed to be said.

Bill

CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
   

On Thu, Jan 20, 2022 at 8:16 AM Olivier Beaute via groups.io <atlanticyachtsurvey=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hello everybody!

I don't like to do this but I think it's time for me to spoil the party. I will try to be straight forward.

Raising the waterline is not a very good idea, although I understand why some of you do it: the aft part of the hull's topsides gets fouled, on the white or red line area. It is only the consequence of the crew loading the vessel too much, or too much aft.
If you raise that line, you will probably load your boat even more. This is not good. Not only for the boat speed (motoring or sailing) but also because it changes the original design, especially about the standing rigging.
How is a standing rigging designed on a sailing boat? It is mainly designed according to the boat's displacement (weight).
If you load your boat too much, the forces that the standing rigging will face (especially in bad weather and the boat is pounding in the waves) will be much more than what it is designed for.

When surveying boats, I sometimes see too much additional equipment or stuff.
On a Super Maramu (I choose this example as it is most represented on this forum) I sometimes see:
-davits or stainless steel arches with solar panels (400 to 600W), one or two wind generators
-diving tank compressor with 2, 3 or 4 (or more...) tanks
-additional fuel tanks and jerrycans
-additional bilge pumps
-big fuel polishing systems
-two dinghies with two outboard engines (one big, one small)
-lots of spare parts (but also lots of old used parts that have not been discarded)
-fully stuffed book shelves
-additional hard dodgers
-staysail with furler
-3 or 4 anchors and tackle
-too many old mooring lines, or old running rigging that was not discarded when replaced
-two RADAR aerials

The first Super Maramus were designed with 5 100Ah batteries, a 80hp engine, a two cylinder 4kW generator, optionnal A/C, 60 liter 24V water-maker, small washing machine, no davits, no arches.
The recommended load of the equipment and crew was 2500 kg (not including fuel and water).
The last Super Maramus, with their 13 batteries, bigger generator and engine, bigger bow fitting, standard 3 A/Cs (sometimes 4, ask Joel...), 100 or 150 liter water-maker,
etc, allowed only 2000 kg.
With these loads, the original waterline was good.
If on your SM, the waterline is not good anymore, this simply means that it is overloaded, which can be sometimes dangerous.

Conclusion:
Before thinking of raising your waterline, try to estimate the weight of the additional equipment that is on board. The best way is to empty your boat from all the non-fixed equipments. You'll be surprised of the amount of material that you will put on the dock!
Then, try to estimate the weight of the fixed equipments (arches, solar panels, diving compressor, extra pumps and fuel systems).
If you find it above 2000 kg (for the SM2000), then you should discard some of these items (books are very heavy and damaged alternators or 10 sets of zincs-I swear I sometimes see this- are not necessary).
You can also decide to sail with only half the water tank if you have a good water-maker, which will give you 500 kg possibility.
Also don't forget to balance your load. On a SM2000, the additional standard equipments are located rather aft (engine, generator, batteries, etc..). So, don't forget to load the front cabin (what I usually see, strangely, is that the front cabin is very empty, compared to the cockpit and aft deck lockers).

Keeping your boat light will make you happy (and faster).

Olivier.




Courtney Gorman
 

Olivier
Thank you so much for the important reminder 
Cheers 🥂 


On Jan 20, 2022, at 10:16 AM, Olivier Beaute via groups.io <atlanticyachtsurvey@...> wrote:

Hello everybody!

I don't like to do this but I think it's time for me to spoil the party. I will try to be straight forward.

Raising the waterline is not a very good idea, although I understand why some of you do it: the aft part of the hull's topsides gets fouled, on the white or red line area. It is only the consequence of the crew loading the vessel too much, or too much aft.
If you raise that line, you will probably load your boat even more. This is not good. Not only for the boat speed (motoring or sailing) but also because it changes the original design, especially about the standing rigging.
How is a standing rigging designed on a sailing boat? It is mainly designed according to the boat's displacement (weight).
If you load your boat too much, the forces that the standing rigging will face (especially in bad weather and the boat is pounding in the waves) will be much more than what it is designed for.

When surveying boats, I sometimes see too much additional equipment or stuff.
On a Super Maramu (I choose this example as it is most represented on this forum) I sometimes see:
-davits or stainless steel arches with solar panels (400 to 600W), one or two wind generators
-diving tank compressor with 2, 3 or 4 (or more...) tanks
-additional fuel tanks and jerrycans
-additional bilge pumps
-big fuel polishing systems
-two dinghies with two outboard engines (one big, one small)
-lots of spare parts (but also lots of old used parts that have not been discarded)
-fully stuffed book shelves
-additional hard dodgers
-staysail with furler
-3 or 4 anchors and tackle
-too many old mooring lines, or old running rigging that was not discarded when replaced
-two RADAR aerials

The first Super Maramus were designed with 5 100Ah batteries, a 80hp engine, a two cylinder 4kW generator, optionnal A/C, 60 liter 24V water-maker, small washing machine, no davits, no arches.
The recommended load of the equipment and crew was 2500 kg (not including fuel and water).
The last Super Maramus, with their 13 batteries, bigger generator and engine, bigger bow fitting, standard 3 A/Cs (sometimes 4, ask Joel...), 100 or 150 liter water-maker,
etc, allowed only 2000 kg.
With these loads, the original waterline was good.
If on your SM, the waterline is not good anymore, this simply means that it is overloaded, which can be sometimes dangerous.

Conclusion:
Before thinking of raising your waterline, try to estimate the weight of the additional equipment that is on board. The best way is to empty your boat from all the non-fixed equipments. You'll be surprised of the amount of material that you will put on the dock!
Then, try to estimate the weight of the fixed equipments (arches, solar panels, diving compressor, extra pumps and fuel systems).
If you find it above 2000 kg (for the SM2000), then you should discard some of these items (books are very heavy and damaged alternators or 10 sets of zincs-I swear I sometimes see this- are not necessary).
You can also decide to sail with only half the water tank if you have a good water-maker, which will give you 500 kg possibility.
Also don't forget to balance your load. On a SM2000, the additional standard equipments are located rather aft (engine, generator, batteries, etc..). So, don't forget to load the front cabin (what I usually see, strangely, is that the front cabin is very empty, compared to the cockpit and aft deck lockers).

Keeping your boat light will make you happy (and faster).

Olivier.




Ian Park
 

Olivier,
When I bought my Santorin the red stripe at the stet was below the water unloaded. The boat has been loaded for ocean crossing. Since we’re back in UK and unloaded a load of gear we have coastal cruised for 2 Covid seasons in local (UK) waters. We still have to brush/scrape the growth on the red lines above the copper coat and especially at the stern. We don’t have an arch, the hydrovane has been removed the lazarette contains only fenders (bumpers) and we are like ghtly loaded.
I will be raising water line at a he stern. I have yet to see a SN or an SM where the red stripe is visible above the water.
No criticism of your comments on overloading at all, but our beautiful boats do sit neatly on their sterns and I am getting too old to jump into northern waters twice a season to clean up the red stripes.
I guess there are a few others who are not overloaded but have come to the same conclusion.

Best wishes and thanks for all your valuable inputs.

Ian
Ocean Hobo. SN96


william reynolds
 

I raised my waterline according to the equipment and gear aboard considering max water, fuel, dingy. It is a great convenience in keeping the hull clean.
It' not practical to assume future gear, loads etc. There would be confusion abound. Every SM waterline I have ever seen is high in the bow and underwater in the stern.
Poor reasons given to not raise the waterline. See attached
Bill 
Cloudstreet


Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Thank you Olivier. A timely reminder.
Danny
SM 299
Ocean Pearl

On 21/01/2022 03:16 Olivier Beaute via groups.io <atlanticyachtsurvey@...> wrote:


Hello everybody!

I don't like to do this but I think it's time for me to spoil the party. I will try to be straight forward.

Raising the waterline is not a very good idea, although I understand why some of you do it: the aft part of the hull's topsides gets fouled, on the white or red line area. It is only the consequence of the crew loading the vessel too much, or too much aft.
If you raise that line, you will probably load your boat even more. This is not good. Not only for the boat speed (motoring or sailing) but also because it changes the original design, especially about the standing rigging.
How is a standing rigging designed on a sailing boat? It is mainly designed according to the boat's displacement (weight).
If you load your boat too much, the forces that the standing rigging will face (especially in bad weather and the boat is pounding in the waves) will be much more than what it is designed for.

When surveying boats, I sometimes see too much additional equipment or stuff.
On a Super Maramu (I choose this example as it is most represented on this forum) I sometimes see:
-davits or stainless steel arches with solar panels (400 to 600W), one or two wind generators
-diving tank compressor with 2, 3 or 4 (or more...) tanks
-additional fuel tanks and jerrycans
-additional bilge pumps
-big fuel polishing systems
-two dinghies with two outboard engines (one big, one small)
-lots of spare parts (but also lots of old used parts that have not been discarded)
-fully stuffed book shelves
-additional hard dodgers
-staysail with furler
-3 or 4 anchors and tackle
-too many old mooring lines, or old running rigging that was not discarded when replaced
-two RADAR aerials

The first Super Maramus were designed with 5 100Ah batteries, a 80hp engine, a two cylinder 4kW generator, optionnal A/C, 60 liter 24V water-maker, small washing machine, no davits, no arches.
The recommended load of the equipment and crew was 2500 kg (not including fuel and water).
The last Super Maramus, with their 13 batteries, bigger generator and engine, bigger bow fitting, standard 3 A/Cs (sometimes 4, ask Joel...), 100 or 150 liter water-maker,
etc, allowed only 2000 kg.
With these loads, the original waterline was good.
If on your SM, the waterline is not good anymore, this simply means that it is overloaded, which can be sometimes dangerous.

Conclusion:
Before thinking of raising your waterline, try to estimate the weight of the additional equipment that is on board. The best way is to empty your boat from all the non-fixed equipments. You'll be surprised of the amount of material that you will put on the dock!
Then, try to estimate the weight of the fixed equipments (arches, solar panels, diving compressor, extra pumps and fuel systems).
If you find it above 2000 kg (for the SM2000), then you should discard some of these items (books are very heavy and damaged alternators or 10 sets of zincs-I swear I sometimes see this- are not necessary).
You can also decide to sail with only half the water tank if you have a good water-maker, which will give you 500 kg possibility.
Also don't forget to balance your load. On a SM2000, the additional standard equipments are located rather aft (engine, generator, batteries, etc..). So, don't forget to load the front cabin (what I usually see, strangely, is that the front cabin is very empty, compared to the cockpit and aft deck lockers).

Keeping your boat light will make you happy (and faster).

Olivier.




Justin Maguire
 

Well put Olivier. 


On Jan 20, 2022, at 21:52, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@...> wrote:


Thank you Olivier. A timely reminder.
Danny
SM 299
Ocean Pearl
On 21/01/2022 03:16 Olivier Beaute via groups.io <atlanticyachtsurvey@...> wrote:


Hello everybody!

I don't like to do this but I think it's time for me to spoil the party. I will try to be straight forward.

Raising the waterline is not a very good idea, although I understand why some of you do it: the aft part of the hull's topsides gets fouled, on the white or red line area. It is only the consequence of the crew loading the vessel too much, or too much aft.
If you raise that line, you will probably load your boat even more. This is not good. Not only for the boat speed (motoring or sailing) but also because it changes the original design, especially about the standing rigging.
How is a standing rigging designed on a sailing boat? It is mainly designed according to the boat's displacement (weight).
If you load your boat too much, the forces that the standing rigging will face (especially in bad weather and the boat is pounding in the waves) will be much more than what it is designed for.

When surveying boats, I sometimes see too much additional equipment or stuff.
On a Super Maramu (I choose this example as it is most represented on this forum) I sometimes see:
-davits or stainless steel arches with solar panels (400 to 600W), one or two wind generators
-diving tank compressor with 2, 3 or 4 (or more...) tanks
-additional fuel tanks and jerrycans
-additional bilge pumps
-big fuel polishing systems
-two dinghies with two outboard engines (one big, one small)
-lots of spare parts (but also lots of old used parts that have not been discarded)
-fully stuffed book shelves
-additional hard dodgers
-staysail with furler
-3 or 4 anchors and tackle
-too many old mooring lines, or old running rigging that was not discarded when replaced
-two RADAR aerials

The first Super Maramus were designed with 5 100Ah batteries, a 80hp engine, a two cylinder 4kW generator, optionnal A/C, 60 liter 24V water-maker, small washing machine, no davits, no arches.
The recommended load of the equipment and crew was 2500 kg (not including fuel and water).
The last Super Maramus, with their 13 batteries, bigger generator and engine, bigger bow fitting, standard 3 A/Cs (sometimes 4, ask Joel...), 100 or 150 liter water-maker,
etc, allowed only 2000 kg.
With these loads, the original waterline was good.
If on your SM, the waterline is not good anymore, this simply means that it is overloaded, which can be sometimes dangerous.

Conclusion:
Before thinking of raising your waterline, try to estimate the weight of the additional equipment that is on board. The best way is to empty your boat from all the non-fixed equipments. You'll be surprised of the amount of material that you will put on the dock!
Then, try to estimate the weight of the fixed equipments (arches, solar panels, diving compressor, extra pumps and fuel systems).
If you find it above 2000 kg (for the SM2000), then you should discard some of these items (books are very heavy and damaged alternators or 10 sets of zincs-I swear I sometimes see this- are not necessary).
You can also decide to sail with only half the water tank if you have a good water-maker, which will give you 500 kg possibility.
Also don't forget to balance your load. On a SM2000, the additional standard equipments are located rather aft (engine, generator, batteries, etc..). So, don't forget to load the front cabin (what I usually see, strangely, is that the front cabin is very empty, compared to the cockpit and aft deck lockers).

Keeping your boat light will make you happy (and faster).

Olivier.




Alan Leslie
 

I don't want to rain on anyone's party, but......
Elyse sat stern down before the solar arch was put on.....I don't think I've ever seen an SM that floated on it's lines, they are all stern down, unless someone has lasered the waterline and painted it to the new slope. We raised the waterline by the same amount all round (simpler) which is why she now looks more bow up than before.
I think the issue particularly with SM2Ks is the bigger generator and the extra batteries to balance the boat so it doesn't list to port. All these heavy items are aft of the pitch centre and so it sits stern down....because Amel didn't change the waterline to reflect the additional weight.
Regarding putting extra weight in the bow of the boat to counter the "extra weight" aft, that's not a good idea - it increases the moment about the pitch centre and leads to....pitching.
We try to sail with the water tank nearly full - why?, because that weight is below the waterline, on the centre line and more or less at the pitch centre, so it adds to stability, (basically increases the keel ballast) particularly sailing upwind - and we have done a lot of that.
So, all in all, we are happy that we raised the waterline a bit - to keep the stern clean.
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


James Alton
 

Oliver,

   Thanks for your post and for the reminder to be careful in deviating original design parameters such as changing the vessel trim.  Our Maramu is pretty well sitting  on her lines now.  There are  a few heavy items that I have moved into the forward locker which has helped but mostly the boat is unmodified from the original design and as such just seems to trim pretty much right on.  I do plan to install a solar arch in the future as it is so useful to a cruising boat but I am working on adjusting the weight being added and calculating the moments so that I can insure that I don't alter the trim of the boat.  I recently went to Lithium house batteries in the engine room which removed about 120 pounds there.  To help insure reliability I wanted to keep a very reliable German gel battery in the mix just in case lightning or something else caused a failure in the Lithium.  The 8D (around 180 pounds) gel is installed in the Port forward cabin locker which will offset most of the arch installation.  This battery originally was installed in the engine room so I was able to move that weight quite a ways forward.  By moving my heavy engine spares such as a spare starter and other heavy items to the stb. forward cabin I should be able to completely cancel a trim change that would be induced by adding the arch which will be my goal.  I think that with some planning it is possible to add some modern items to the boat while retaining the original trim.
   Thanks Oliver for the many years of sharing your in depth knowledge of these boats,  you have helped me a lot and I sure that many others feel the same.


James Alton
SV Sueno
Maramu #220
Marmaris, Turkey


-----Original Message-----
From: Olivier Beaute via groups.io <atlanticyachtsurvey@...>
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Sent: Thu, Jan 20, 2022 5:16 pm
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Raising Boot Stripe

Hello everybody!

I don't like to do this but I think it's time for me to spoil the party. I will try to be straight forward.

Raising the waterline is not a very good idea, although I understand why some of you do it: the aft part of the hull's topsides gets fouled, on the white or red line area. It is only the consequence of the crew loading the vessel too much, or too much aft.
If you raise that line, you will probably load your boat even more. This is not good. Not only for the boat speed (motoring or sailing) but also because it changes the original design, especially about the standing rigging.
How is a standing rigging designed on a sailing boat? It is mainly designed according to the boat's displacement (weight).
If you load your boat too much, the forces that the standing rigging will face (especially in bad weather and the boat is pounding in the waves) will be much more than what it is designed for.

When surveying boats, I sometimes see too much additional equipment or stuff.
On a Super Maramu (I choose this example as it is most represented on this forum) I sometimes see:
-davits or stainless steel arches with solar panels (400 to 600W), one or two wind generators
-diving tank compressor with 2, 3 or 4 (or more...) tanks
-additional fuel tanks and jerrycans
-additional bilge pumps
-big fuel polishing systems
-two dinghies with two outboard engines (one big, one small)
-lots of spare parts (but also lots of old used parts that have not been discarded)
-fully stuffed book shelves
-additional hard dodgers
-staysail with furler
-3 or 4 anchors and tackle
-too many old mooring lines, or old running rigging that was not discarded when replaced
-two RADAR aerials

The first Super Maramus were designed with 5 100Ah batteries, a 80hp engine, a two cylinder 4kW generator, optionnal A/C, 60 liter 24V water-maker, small washing machine, no davits, no arches.
The recommended load of the equipment and crew was 2500 kg (not including fuel and water).
The last Super Maramus, with their 13 batteries, bigger generator and engine, bigger bow fitting, standard 3 A/Cs (sometimes 4, ask Joel...), 100 or 150 liter water-maker,
etc, allowed only 2000 kg.
With these loads, the original waterline was good.
If on your SM, the waterline is not good anymore, this simply means that it is overloaded, which can be sometimes dangerous.

Conclusion:
Before thinking of raising your waterline, try to estimate the weight of the additional equipment that is on board. The best way is to empty your boat from all the non-fixed equipments. You'll be surprised of the amount of material that you will put on the dock!
Then, try to estimate the weight of the fixed equipments (arches, solar panels, diving compressor, extra pumps and fuel systems).
If you find it above 2000 kg (for the SM2000), then you should discard some of these items (books are very heavy and damaged alternators or 10 sets of zincs-I swear I sometimes see this- are not necessary).
You can also decide to sail with only half the water tank if you have a good water-maker, which will give you 500 kg possibility.
Also don't forget to balance your load. On a SM2000, the additional standard equipments are located rather aft (engine, generator, batteries, etc..). So, don't forget to load the front cabin (what I usually see, strangely, is that the front cabin is very empty, compared to the cockpit and aft deck lockers).

Keeping your boat light will make you happy (and faster).

Olivier.




karkauai
 

I added 50ft of chain to the bow locker, and moved my tools and some other heavier items forward.  She sails better, particularly upwind, with less banging into the seas.  She seems faster, too, but I can't document that.  2 years after making those changes, I changed the waterline to reflect the way she sits.  It makes a huge difference in cleaning the hull.  Our waterline now starts where the old waterline was, and comes aft to finish a few inches above where the original line was on the stern.
Kent
SM 243
Kristy

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Kent & Iris
KRISTY
SM243