Running larger battery charger cables


william reynolds
 

I'm replacing my 50 amp Dolphin charger with a 100 amp Dolphin charger. The larger charger requires larger cables. Past posts have addressed the issue and no one 
has come up with a suggestion on running new cables through the present cable duct which is filled with some very hard material. I would like to hear form anyone who has   attempted  rerunning cables through the existing ducting.
 Bill Reynolds
Cloudstreet 


Chris Doucette
 

You can drill new holes above them through the bulkhead there’s an area in front of the tank that small just above where the cables penetrate right Within the foot step.  
Make sure you know we are drilling as not to drill into the fuel tank.


On Jun 12, 2021, at 11:52 AM, william reynolds <sail23692@...> wrote:

I'm replacing my 50 amp Dolphin charger with a 100 amp Dolphin charger. The larger charger requires larger cables. Past posts have addressed the issue and no one 
has come up with a suggestion on running new cables through the present cable duct which is filled with some very hard material. I would like to hear form anyone who has   attempted  rerunning cables through the existing ducting.
 Bill Reynolds
Cloudstreet 


Alan Leslie
 

As long as you drill through vertically above the existing cables in the cable way, you will miss the fuel tank.
I know, I've done it.
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Jason Rutledge
 

Take pictures when you do it!
--
Jason Rutledge
SV Liahona
SM 335


Jose Venegas
 

Bill,
Two years ago, I replaced my chargers for  Mastervolt 60 amp and 100 amp.  According to the specs for the 100 am charger a cable AWG2 is perfectly fine and thus it can be connected to the batteries with the standard cables of our boat.  I would not spend the effort changing them. If you want to add extra safety you can connect in parallel the cables going for each of the two battery chargers.  I kept the same cables of the original 30 and 60 amp charger cables for the 60 and 100 amp chargers without any problem.

Jose
Ipanema SM 276


Bill Kinney
 

If you drill holes here, be sure to figure out how you are going to make them waterproof after running the cables.   This is one of the watertight bulkheads that is critical to making an Amel, an Amel.  The engine room is by far the most likely place to have water entering the boat in an unplanned manner.  That is a big enough problem, but having holes which allow that problem to spread unchecked to the rest of the hull has the potential to turn a big problem into a disaster.


Many of the older Amels I have been on have some, or in a few cases all, of the watertight bulkheads compromised by unthinking modifications.

If you have an Amel savvy surveyor, one of the first things he’ll look for is holes in what are supposed to be watertight bulkheads.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie 
Great Harbor, Long Island, Bahamas