Topics

Santorin Balooner

joseph mc donnell
 

Craig 
Our Santorin was built in late 1991 and commissioned in 1992, Unfortunately I cant tell you the hull number as I don't have that information to hand. I've used the SM system and our Santorin Khamsin, has a system that is a lot more basic. So, I wonder when the change was made by Amel. Probably not worth it to trying to get an answer.
 But overall, I still think the Ballooner is a brilliant sail and the system developed by Amel to fly it one of the safest.
Regards Joe  

Ian
 

Recently arrived in Lanzarote from Mohammedia on Morocco. We were running down wind with the ballooner. Very stable set up. But as the wind rose we hadn't dropped it and it was now night. So we simply furled the two sails down to a third of there normal size and sailed through the night at 6 knots. Utterly secure.
We should have removed the ballooner when the wind got to 20 knots. It got up to 34 during the night.
We waited till the wind dropped the next day and unfurled, dropped the ballooner and carried on.
It is a great system and really dampened the rolling. Yes it takes time to set up, but was intended as a passage sail system.
Learnt our lesson - we thought about taking it down before dinner that evening and didn't. The old adage, if you are thinking about reefing, do it!

Ian and Lind 'Ocean Hobo' SN 96

Dave_Benjamin
 

Your experience is exactly why I have shifted away from using the original Amel system in favor of an independent foil-less furler for the balooner. There's a good likelihood that your balooner may have been distorted during that exposure to those high winds. 

Ian
 

Everyone to their own choice.
I had an asymmetric on a removable bowsprit and Bamar furler on my last boat. Great for what it did. But it was not without it's occasional issue involving foredeck work

I'm 67 now and can do without squirming around the foredeck on a dark and breezy night. So the original Amel system suits down to the ground! And I didn't compound one error with a second. We wound in so small we were down to 5 knots running out the wind. All safely stored the next day and no distortion to the sails!

Ian. SN 96 Ocean Hobo

Eamonn Washington
 

Hi, I have been wondering about what to do when the true wind gets to 20 knots.  Amel says if the true wind exceeds 20 knots then the balooner and foresail may be rolled together.  I wondered if the documentation meant fully rolled together (to protect the nylon balooner from ripping) or just reefed, so partly furling the 2 sails together and continue with no risk of damage to the balooner.

Based on Ian’s experience, partly furling seems to work fine.  Dave suggested it would distort the balooner to have it reefed in over 20 knots.  What is the experience and recommendations of this group?

I have only used the main balooner a dozen times for practice day trips and one overnight so far, and always removed it when the wind got to 15 knots true, up to now.  I hope to have the twin headsails up all the time for an upcoming Atlantic crossing, but this 20 knots Amel recommendation was always ambiguous to me.

Thanks

Eamonn Washington
Travel Bug
Super Maramu #151
Currently in Alghero, Sardinia, Italy.

heinz@quetzal.berlin
 

Hello 
When crossing the Atlantic and the Pacific, We only rolled up the balooner as far as necessary. When the thunderstorm was over it was easy to roll it out again. 
We never had any damage to the sail. Even if one is alone at the helm. 
But at night it is necessary to use the radar, so the thunderstorms can be seen very well and you can reef in time. 

Fare winds 
Heinz, Sailing yacht Quetzal, SM 2000, 292


Am 01.09.2019 um 22:41 schrieb Eamonn Washington <eamonn.washington@...>:

Hi, I have been wondering about what to do when the true wind gets to 20 knots.  Amel says if the true wind exceeds 20 knots then the balooner and foresail may be rolled together.  I wondered if the documentation meant fully rolled together (to protect the nylon balooner from ripping) or just reefed, so partly furling the 2 sails together and continue with no risk of damage to the balooner.

Based on Ian’s experience, partly furling seems to work fine.  Dave suggested it would distort the balooner to have it reefed in over 20 knots.  What is the experience and recommendations of this group?

I have only used the main balooner a dozen times for practice day trips and one overnight so far, and always removed it when the wind got to 15 knots true, up to now.  I hope to have the twin headsails up all the time for an upcoming Atlantic crossing, but this 20 knots Amel recommendation was always ambiguous to me.

Thanks

Eamonn Washington
Travel Bug
Super Maramu #151
Currently in Alghero, Sardinia, Italy.

Herbert Lackner
 

Eamonn, partly furling worked fine for us when the wind got stronger, to be on the safe side we reduce size in the night, never had any problems. did not change the setup during our atlantic crossing, only furling in and out. needs above 12 knots of true wind when there are waves. no problem in more then 30knots when partly furled

btw: our balooner has been made by Dave Benjamin, works very fine.

Eamonn Washington
 

Thanks Heinz and Herbert, your replies have given me peace of mind to just reef when necessary.

Eamonn Washington
Travel Bug
Super Maramu #151
Currently in Alghero, Sardinia, Italy.