Yesterdays grounding


Nick Newington
 

Hi fellow Amel owners,

I have been going over the events of yesterday evening and trying to work out what went wrong.

We anchored beside Kas Marina. It is deep but completely protected from swell and seemingly good holding.
We chose to anchor in 17m closish to the shore with a light breeze blowing off. We had 60m of chain set pulling off the shore. I set the anchor and it was solid. Our stern was in 20m.
Then later at about 19:30 we went ashore. It was calm but sultry with a few drops of rain.
Whilst ashore a squall developed and blew 180 degrees from when we set the anchor blowing the boat towards the shore. It would have been pretty windy. Not sure maybe 30kn. May be more. I just do not know.

Someone on the nearby gullet took this short video


It shows the boat bow to wind. If she had been dragging she would be beam on…and aground on her keel.
My opinion is that I simply did not allow enough swinging room. I was too focused on not dragging into the deep water.

Of course we may have dragged or used a few meters to reset the anchor. I do not think so. I believe I simply misjudged the required swinging room. I will never know.
But given the 17m boat length plus 60m of chain and no catenary effect as we swung into the shallow water. I ask myself was I far enough off shore when I placed the anchor??? I now have doubts…and closer inspection shows some underwater rocks off the shore a way.

Fortunately the rudder did not touch the skeg did. It has a small ding that has exposed the glass. Something that I can easily repair when I next haul out.
The skeg mounted rudder is a great design feature. A deep fully balanced rudder would have been a different story.

The guys from the gullet and the fire/rescue boat towed us over to the slipway berth at the boatyard and tied us all four centre chamber . They did a great job and probably saved more damage to the skeg. I am very lucky that the rudder is untouched. The complete protection offered by the anchorage led me into a sense of security that clearly clouded my judgment of swinging room, but it did make damage minimal.

Lessons learned not necessarily in this order.

1. I should have sensed the sultry hot wet air was ripe for a squall and not left the boat unattended.

2. I should have allowed more swinging room. Allowed for full 180 degree wind shift and checked the shore more carefully.
I could have used the radar to work out swinging room accurately. Better still snorkelled the area.

3. These deep anchorages probably lend themselves to anchoring with a long ashore.??

I am grateful to everyone who went into action .

PS the more I think about it the more convinced I am that we did not drag and that we swung into danger…

Nick
S/Y Amelia
Humbled by how quickly things go wrong, and heeding mother natures warning.
AML 54-019
Kas


Ian Park
 

Bravo for sharing your drama. It happened to me in Grenada when I left the boat unattended. Mine dragged 100m into soft mud in a squall. The only damage was my ego. Any other rudder would have had at least a bent rudder shaft. I motored off with a very red face. It was a shock to find a the boat missing and a relief to see it sitting in the mangroves!!


david bruce
 

Informative to read: Good lessons for us!

On 27 May 2022, at 5:30 AM, Nick Newington via groups.io <ngtnewington@...> wrote:

Hi fellow Amel owners,

I have been going over the events of yesterday evening and trying to work out what went wrong.

We anchored beside Kas Marina. It is deep but completely protected from swell and seemingly good holding.
We chose to anchor in 17m closish to the shore with a light breeze blowing off. We had 60m of chain set pulling off the shore. I set the anchor and it was solid. Our stern was in 20m.
Then later at about 19:30 we went ashore. It was calm but sultry with a few drops of rain.
Whilst ashore a squall developed and blew 180 degrees from when we set the anchor blowing the boat towards the shore. It would have been pretty windy. Not sure maybe 30kn. May be more. I just do not know.

Someone on the nearby gullet took this short video


It shows the boat bow to wind. If she had been dragging she would be beam on…and aground on her keel.
My opinion is that I simply did not allow enough swinging room. I was too focused on not dragging into the deep water.

Of course we may have dragged or used a few meters to reset the anchor. I do not think so. I believe I simply misjudged the required swinging room. I will never know.
But given the 17m boat length plus 60m of chain and no catenary effect as we swung into the shallow water. I ask myself was I far enough off shore when I placed the anchor??? I now have doubts…and closer inspection shows some underwater rocks off the shore a way.

Fortunately the rudder did not touch the skeg did. It has a small ding that has exposed the glass. Something that I can easily repair when I next haul out.
The skeg mounted rudder is a great design feature. A deep fully balanced rudder would have been a different story.

The guys from the gullet and the fire/rescue boat towed us over to the slipway berth at the boatyard and tied us all four centre chamber . They did a great job and probably saved more damage to the skeg. I am very lucky that the rudder is untouched. The complete protection offered by the anchorage led me into a sense of security that clearly clouded my judgment of swinging room, but it did make damage minimal.

Lessons learned not necessarily in this order.

1. I should have sensed the sultry hot wet air was ripe for a squall and not left the boat unattended.

2. I should have allowed more swinging room. Allowed for full 180 degree wind shift and checked the shore more carefully.
I could have used the radar to work out swinging room accurately. Better still snorkelled the area.

3. These deep anchorages probably lend themselves to anchoring with a long ashore.??

I am grateful to everyone who went into action .

PS the more I think about it the more convinced I am that we did not drag and that we swung into danger…

Nick
S/Y Amelia
Humbled by how quickly things go wrong, and heeding mother natures warning.
AML 54-019
Kas





<Video.mov>


James Alton
 

David,

   I have been exchanging emails with Nick.  He really knows how to handle a boat so I was surprised that this happened to him. It shows that it can happen to any of us.  The weather in the Med is so changeable that we try to prepare for a gale every evening and or before we leave the boat.  Things can happen so quickly.  We are lying with only about 25' of our 300' of chain left in the locker, having anchored in 70' of water.  Two lines ashore and I backed down to 2000 rpm to test the anchor so feel pretty good.  Our slip will open up on the 30th so we might come back early,  only 1 day away.  

Jim


-----Original Message-----
From: david bruce <davidcbruce57@...>
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Sent: Fri, May 27, 2022 9:13 am
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Yesterdays grounding

Informative to read:  Good lessons for us! 


> On 27 May 2022, at 5:30 AM, Nick Newington via groups.io <ngtnewington=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
>
> Hi fellow Amel owners,
>
> I have been going over the events  of yesterday evening and trying to work out what went wrong.
>
> We anchored beside Kas Marina. It is deep but completely protected from swell and seemingly good holding.
> We chose to anchor in 17m closish to the shore with a light breeze blowing off. We had 60m of chain  set pulling off the shore. I set the anchor and it was solid. Our stern was in 20m.
> Then later at about 19:30 we went ashore. It was calm but sultry with a few drops of rain.
> Whilst ashore a squall developed and blew 180 degrees from when we set the anchor blowing the boat towards the shore. It would have been pretty windy. Not sure maybe 30kn. May be more. I just do not know.
>
> Someone on the nearby gullet took this short video
>
>
> It shows the boat bow to wind. If she had been dragging she would be beam on…and aground on her keel.
> My opinion is that I simply did not allow enough swinging room. I was too focused on not dragging into the deep water.
>
> Of course we may have dragged or used a few meters to reset the anchor. I do not think so. I believe I simply misjudged the required swinging room. I will never know.
> But given the 17m boat length plus 60m of chain and no catenary effect as we swung into the shallow water. I ask myself was I far enough off shore when I placed the anchor??? I now have doubts…and closer inspection shows some underwater rocks off the shore a way.
>
> Fortunately the rudder did not touch the skeg did. It has a small ding that has exposed the glass.  Something that I can easily repair when I next haul out.
> The skeg mounted rudder is a great design feature. A deep fully balanced rudder would have been a different story.
>
> The guys from the gullet and the fire/rescue boat towed us over to the slipway berth at the boatyard and tied us all four centre chamber . They did a great job and probably saved more damage to the skeg. I am very lucky that the rudder is untouched. The complete protection offered by the anchorage led me into a sense of security that clearly clouded my judgment of swinging room, but it did make damage minimal.
>
> Lessons learned not necessarily in this order.
>
> 1. I should have sensed the sultry hot wet air was ripe for a squall and not left the boat unattended.
>
> 2.  I should have allowed more swinging room.  Allowed for full 180 degree wind shift and checked the shore  more carefully.
> I could have used the radar to work out swinging room accurately. Better still snorkelled the area.
>
> 3. These deep anchorages probably lend themselves to anchoring with a long ashore.??
>
> I am grateful to everyone who went into action .
>
> PS the more I think about it the more convinced  I am that we did not drag and that we swung into danger…
>
> Nick
> S/Y Amelia
> Humbled by how quickly things go wrong, and heeding mother natures warning.
> AML 54-019
> Kas
>
>
>
>
>
> <Video.mov>







 

Nick,

I am sorry for your experience. We have all dragged anchor for various reasons. Those that have never dragged, probably do not yet have enough experience.

A few comments:
  1. Your scope was only about 3:1 (60/(17+2) Sometimes we forget to add the distance from the water to the roller
  2. It is true that when unanchored the beam is to the wind, but sometimes there is enough drag of the anchor to hold the bow into the wind.
Bill


CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
   


On Fri, May 27, 2022 at 8:10 AM James Alton via groups.io <lokiyawl2=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
David,

   I have been exchanging emails with Nick.  He really knows how to handle a boat so I was surprised that this happened to him. It shows that it can happen to any of us.  The weather in the Med is so changeable that we try to prepare for a gale every evening and or before we leave the boat.  Things can happen so quickly.  We are lying with only about 25' of our 300' of chain left in the locker, having anchored in 70' of water.  Two lines ashore and I backed down to 2000 rpm to test the anchor so feel pretty good.  Our slip will open up on the 30th so we might come back early,  only 1 day away.  

Jim


-----Original Message-----
From: david bruce <davidcbruce57@...>
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Sent: Fri, May 27, 2022 9:13 am
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Yesterdays grounding

Informative to read:  Good lessons for us! 


> On 27 May 2022, at 5:30 AM, Nick Newington via groups.io <ngtnewington=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
>
> Hi fellow Amel owners,
>
> I have been going over the events  of yesterday evening and trying to work out what went wrong.
>
> We anchored beside Kas Marina. It is deep but completely protected from swell and seemingly good holding.
> We chose to anchor in 17m closish to the shore with a light breeze blowing off. We had 60m of chain  set pulling off the shore. I set the anchor and it was solid. Our stern was in 20m.
> Then later at about 19:30 we went ashore. It was calm but sultry with a few drops of rain.
> Whilst ashore a squall developed and blew 180 degrees from when we set the anchor blowing the boat towards the shore. It would have been pretty windy. Not sure maybe 30kn. May be more. I just do not know.
>
> Someone on the nearby gullet took this short video
>
>
> It shows the boat bow to wind. If she had been dragging she would be beam on…and aground on her keel.
> My opinion is that I simply did not allow enough swinging room. I was too focused on not dragging into the deep water.
>
> Of course we may have dragged or used a few meters to reset the anchor. I do not think so. I believe I simply misjudged the required swinging room. I will never know.
> But given the 17m boat length plus 60m of chain and no catenary effect as we swung into the shallow water. I ask myself was I far enough off shore when I placed the anchor??? I now have doubts…and closer inspection shows some underwater rocks off the shore a way.
>
> Fortunately the rudder did not touch the skeg did. It has a small ding that has exposed the glass.  Something that I can easily repair when I next haul out.
> The skeg mounted rudder is a great design feature. A deep fully balanced rudder would have been a different story.
>
> The guys from the gullet and the fire/rescue boat towed us over to the slipway berth at the boatyard and tied us all four centre chamber . They did a great job and probably saved more damage to the skeg. I am very lucky that the rudder is untouched. The complete protection offered by the anchorage led me into a sense of security that clearly clouded my judgment of swinging room, but it did make damage minimal.
>
> Lessons learned not necessarily in this order.
>
> 1. I should have sensed the sultry hot wet air was ripe for a squall and not left the boat unattended.
>
> 2.  I should have allowed more swinging room.  Allowed for full 180 degree wind shift and checked the shore  more carefully.
> I could have used the radar to work out swinging room accurately. Better still snorkelled the area.
>
> 3. These deep anchorages probably lend themselves to anchoring with a long ashore.??
>
> I am grateful to everyone who went into action .
>
> PS the more I think about it the more convinced  I am that we did not drag and that we swung into danger…
>
> Nick
> S/Y Amelia
> Humbled by how quickly things go wrong, and heeding mother natures warning.
> AML 54-019
> Kas
>
>
>
>
>
> <Video.mov>







Paul Harries
 

Is it possible to set up a remote anchor alarm to warn of boat swing over ninety degrees?
There are so many anchor alarm products out there I have no idea what is possible!

Would a remote anchor alarm warning of major swing or major change in wind have helped?
--
Paul Harries
Prospective Amel Buyer


Ian Park
 

Generally I always leave the keys in my ignition when I go ashore. With the Amel they are separate to the hatch keys. 
I’ve boarded dragging boats a couple of times in anchorages and it would have been much easier just to be able to start the engine to stop and relocate the boat. 
We are a pretty honest and helpful breed. 

Ian


On 27 May 2022, at 16:21, Paul Harries via groups.io <Pharries@...> wrote:

Is it possible to set up a remote anchor alarm to warn of boat swing over ninety degrees?
There are so many anchor alarm products out there I have no idea what is possible!

Would a remote anchor alarm warning of major swing or major change in wind have helped?
--
Paul Harries
Prospective Amel Buyer


ianjenkins1946 <ianjudyjenkins@hotmail.com>
 

Hi Nick , 

As sailors we never stop learning . I had anchored in very shallow water recently 1 meter under our keel so we cd be close to shore . Big blow , ( 40k gusts ) and that shallow means no catenary to speak of . We bailed out at the usual hour of 3 am as a catamaran was a bit close . Judy had just broken her wrist so it was a one man exercise . Pen Azen took care of us . 
The one thing I sometimes fail to add to my swing calculations is that our GPS aerial is on our stern , so I need to add 15 meters to any circle . 

Long May we live to tell the tales ! 

Ian and Judy , Pen Azen, SM 302 , Napflion , Greece 


From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of Ian Park <parkianj@...>
Sent: Friday, May 27, 2022 7:09:38 PM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io <main@amelyachtowners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Yesterdays grounding
 
Generally I always leave the keys in my ignition when I go ashore. With the Amel they are separate to the hatch keys. 
I’ve boarded dragging boats a couple of times in anchorages and it would have been much easier just to be able to start the engine to stop and relocate the boat. 
We are a pretty honest and helpful breed. 

Ian


On 27 May 2022, at 16:21, Paul Harries via groups.io <Pharries@...> wrote:

Is it possible to set up a remote anchor alarm to warn of boat swing over ninety degrees?
There are so many anchor alarm products out there I have no idea what is possible!

Would a remote anchor alarm warning of major swing or major change in wind have helped?
--
Paul Harries
Prospective Amel Buyer


Nick Newington
 

Hi Ian and others,
I have left my keys in the ignition for years. I actually grease them so they do not stick.
Yesterday evening  for the first time ever, just about , we took the key out and locked up. The Navily website talked about theft in Kas. So we thought someone could just nick the boat, let’s not leave the key in….
When you go over it all in your mind after the event it is amazing just how many things stacked up. 
We chose our anchorage position unwisely. The day had been so calm, we motored from Kekova in flat calm…we chose to anchor off a pretty spot with cleaner water for swimming rather than further up the bay etc etc etc. what ifs and should haves….the point is when you play around cruising long enough it only takes a moment of complacency to catch you out.

I share the story because I feel that I have nothing to hide.,Sh1t happens. Lets learn from it…to be brutally honest I think that I was and have become complacent. 

My first boat “Faith of Norfolk”  barely had an engine. We circumnavigated on a shoe string 1990-1994/5. We never ate in restaurants and often set two anchors. If you have no engine then you plan for the worst. We had our adventures for sure…but now 30 years later, more knowledgeable for sure, reliable engine, great boat. Windlass X 2…the mind boggles.   Good seamanship comes from paranoia, from fear….it is too easy to forget. I remember nights hove to off shore. Waiting for dawn, a feeling of fear deep down in the pit of my stomach. Just how strong is the current/leeway? my last position line 18 hours ago. DR pretty rough and ready at the best of times… now gps and chart plotter plus navionics…on my phone.

There is no doubt, no fear…thus it is easy to become soft….to become complacent…

So the lesson is simple. 
Be paranoid
Be fearful
Turn on the senses

Nick 
S/ Y Amelia
AML54-019
Anchored stern to Wall Bay Fethiye Bay. Dins aboard. Flat calm



On 27 May 2022, at 19:09, Ian Park <parkianj@...> wrote:

Generally I always leave the keys in my ignition when I go ashore. With the Amel they are separate to the hatch keys. 
I’ve boarded dragging boats a couple of times in anchorages and it would have been much easier just to be able to start the engine to stop and relocate the boat. 
We are a pretty honest and helpful breed. 

Ian


On 27 May 2022, at 16:21, Paul Harries via groups.io <Pharries@...> wrote:

Is it possible to set up a remote anchor alarm to warn of boat swing over ninety degrees?
There are so many anchor alarm products out there I have no idea what is possible!

Would a remote anchor alarm warning of major swing or major change in wind have helped?
--
Paul Harries
Prospective Amel Buyer


Rick Stanley
 

Hey Nick sorry to hear about this, but glad you're sharing with the group. As we round the bend on our refit (we're about 2 years into a 4 year project) -- and also, being way up in the Chesapeake, I"m fully confident I"ll be experiencing all of this -- running aground, dragging anchor, severe squalls, the ineptitude of others, dangerous sea states, reefs, large meteors, and possibly alien invasions.

I expect all of that, generally. I hope my reflexes are sharp enough to avoid the catastrophic. It's always a good reminder that the smallest of miscalculations can lead to severe outcomes.

Best wishes,

Rick Stanley
S/V Althea SM2k
Rock Hall, MD